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eBook King's Dream: The Legacy of Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream Speech (Icons of America) download

by Eric J. Sundquist

eBook King's Dream: The Legacy of Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream Speech (Icons of America) download ISBN: 0300158599
Author: Eric J. Sundquist
Publisher: Yale University Press; Second Edition edition (August 25, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1328 kb
Fb2: 1551 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf lrf azw lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

A feeling from their answers and our final. AUGUSTA SAVAGE (1900-1962). Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. games with his older sister Christine and his younger brother.

A feeling from their answers and our final. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications. Becoming King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Making of a National Leader (Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century). 270 Pages·2008·940 KB·4,234 Downloads·New!, to become the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in 1954. His name was Martin Luther King J. .

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character

The goal of the study is to help understand the nature of King's dream and its continuing vitality. As with most writing of depth, King's speech has been appropriated for many purposes. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.

King saw black civil rights as integral to America. He vision does not reject the American dream but accepts and amplifies upon it. King spoke of brotherhood and love among all races and all people. This is a highly important ideal that still needs to be realized and fleshed out. For King the ideal was not inconsistent with race consciousness on certain matters. King spoke with passion and with religious fervor. His speech is pervaded by Biblical allusions.

King’s speech, elegantly structured and commanding in tone, has .

King’s speech, elegantly structured and commanding in tone, has become shortha. I have a dream -no words are more widely recognized, or more often repeated, than those called out from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial by Martin Luther King, J. in 1963. King’s speech, elegantly structured and commanding in tone, has become shorthand not only for his own life but for the entire civil rights movement. This book is the first to set King’s speech within the cultural and rhetorical traditions on which the civil rights leader drew in crafting his oratory, as well as its essential historical contexts, from the early days of the republic through present-day Supreme Court rulings.

I have a dream"no words are more widely recognized, or more often repeated, than those called out from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial by Martin Luther King, J. in 1963

I have a dream"no words are more widely recognized, or more often repeated, than those called out from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial by Martin Luther King, J. King's speech, elegantly structured and commanding in tone, has become shorthand not only for his own life but for the entire civil rights movement.

The I have a dream speech by Martin Luther King is recognised as one of the best speeches ever given

The I have a dream speech by Martin Luther King is recognised as one of the best speeches ever given. Here Stevie Edwards looks at what makes it so memorable. Analysis of the Speech. More than 40 years ago, in August 1963, Martin Luther King electrified America with his momentous ‘I Have A Dream’ speech, dramatically delivered from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. His soaring rhetoric demanding racial justice and an integrated society became a mantra for the black community and is as familiar to subsequent generations of Americans as the US Declaration of Independence.

Martin Luther King, Jr. I Have a Dream. delivered 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington . I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal

Martin Luther King, Jr. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal. I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

Last Update January 13, 2015 We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce .

Last Update January 13, 2015. Transcript of Martin Luther King J. s 'I have a dream' speech. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy.

powerful American address of the twentieth century. Clay Risen, Washington Post Book World Eric J. Sundquist is UCLA Foundation Professor of Literature, UCLA.

Now available in paperback, “one of the best short books we have on the ideas of racial equality” (George Bornstein, Times Literary Supplement)

In this assessment of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous 1963 speech, Eric J. Sundquist explores its origins, its place in the long history of American debates about equality and race, and why it is now hailed as the most powerful American address of the twentieth century.

“The speech and all that surrounds it―background and consequences―are brought magnificently to life. . . . Sundquist has written about race and ethnicity in American culture. In this book he gives us drama and emotion, a powerful sense of history combined with illuminating scholarship.”―Anthony Lewis, New York Times Book Review (Editor's Choice)

“Each chapter of Sundquist's intelligent and important book focuses on one of several themes in the speech, unpacking the sources of the words and placing them within a broader civil rights context. His last chapter, ‘Not by the Color of Their Skin,’ is one of the most incisive analyses of the affirmative action debate I have ever read.”―Clay Risen, Washington Post Book World

Eric J. Sundquist is UCLA Foundation Professor of Literature, UCLA. He is author or editor of eight books on American literature and culture, including the award-winning volumes To Wake the Nations and Strangers in the Land.

Icons of America

Icons of America is a series of short works written by leading scholars, critics, and writers, each of whom tells a new and innovativestory about American history and culture through the lens of a single iconic individual, event, object, or cultural phenomenon.

A Caravan Book. For more information, visit www.caravanbooks.org

•Contains the full text of King’s “I Have a Dream” speech •Publication timed for the anniversary of the speech
Comments: (6)
Arashitilar
The inauguration of Barack Obama provides an occasion to review the role of great oratory in America's public life. This fascinating and readable volume brings to life the origins, meaning, and consequences of the address which is better known than any other--Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I have a dream" speech. It joins Gary Wills' "Lincoln at Gettysburg" Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words that Remade America (Simon & Schuster Lincoln Library) and Ronald White's "Lincoln's Greatest Speech" Lincoln's Greatest Speech: The Second Inaugural as exemplars of the genre.

In his last sermon, shortly before he was killed, King said, "I have seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land." Like Moses, King saw the promised land only from a distance. Obama has called his generation the "Joshua generation," the generation that followed Moses and led the people into the promised land. Obama's analogy is insightful and accurate. Without Lincoln and King, and without the speech chronicled here, Obama--and our country--would not be where they are today.
Rocksmith
Enjoyable reading.
Reemiel
Shipped quickly & nice book. Thank you.
Gir
In his speech delivered at the Lincoln Memorial during the August 28, 1963, March on Washington, Dr. Martin Luther King inspired the nation with his words "I have a dream." King's speech has been described as the best political speech of the Twentieth Century. High school students are able to identify the source of the phrase "I have a dream" much more consistently than they are able to identify the opening words of the Gettysburg Address or the Declaration of Independence. In his stunning and eloquent language, King disregarded the final third of the prepared text of his speech and spoke from his heart. As King himself latter recounted the origin of the speech:

"I started out reading the speech ... all of a sudden this thing came out of me that I have used - I'd used it many times before, that thing about `I have a dream' - and I just felt that I wanted to use it here. I don't know why, I hadn't thought about it before the speech." (Quoted in Sundquist, p. 14)

Eric Sundquist's recent book "King's Dream" (2009) is a meditation on this, the most famous speech of Martin Luther King. The goal of the study is to help understand the nature of King's dream and its continuing vitality. As with most writing of depth, King's speech has been appropriated for many purposes. With time and with the speech's iconic character, it has been commercialized and too-often trivialized and sentimentalized. It is a worthy goal to take a close look at the speech. Sundquist does not offer a line-by-line commentary on King's words, although such an approach might prove useful in another book. Rather, Sundquist tries to place King's speech in context by reading the text and by moving both forward and back to discuss its historical and cultural significance. (Introduction, p. 12) Sundquist is the UCLA Foundation Professor of Literature, and he has written widely on American literature and culture.

The best way to read this book is to begin with Sundquist's introduction and then to turn to the text of King's speech itself, which is given as an Appendix to the book. This approach will allow the reader to focus closely on King's speech as a whole before turning to Sundquist's discussion. In this way, the reader may think through some of the poetical and important thoughts of King, both those in the "I have a dream" section of the speech and earlier. Some of the phrases and themes in the speech that Sundquist explores are as follows.

From the prepared text:

"In a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir."

"We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now....
Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children."

"Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred."

From the "I have a dream" section of the speech:

"I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream."

"I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood."

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today."

"With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood."

"My country `tis of the sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. .... And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true."

"Free at last! Free at last!
Thank God Almighty, we are free at last.!"

Sundquist elucidates these and other words on the speech by, among other ways, comparing them to other speeches of Dr. King, before and after this famous speech, by comparing them to other seminal American documents and events, by discussing the speech in the context of the pending Civil Rights legislation and the continued pattern of violence, (North and South), and by exploring various responses to and interpretations of the speech. Sundquist uses the famous "four little children" section of the speech to explore the involved and difficult question of King's attitude to affirmative action and its basis. Sundquist encourages the reader to think through the nature of King's dream as it stood in 1963 and as it has evolved with time.

In my view, King spoke both for the rights of black American's and for the American dream of equal rights for all. King saw black civil rights as integral to America. He vision does not reject the American dream but accepts and amplifies upon it. King spoke of brotherhood and love among all races and all people. This is a highly important ideal that still needs to be realized and fleshed out. For King the ideal was not inconsistent with race consciousness on certain matters. King spoke with passion and with religious fervor. His speech is pervaded by Biblical allusions. His speech captures the immediacy of a moment with learning, poetic beauty and love. King's speech has become iconic because it expounded and amplified upon the American dream. He had the rare gift of articulating a shared vision. Sundquist's book helped me to think about King's great speech.

Robin Friedman
Goldenfang
On August 28, 1963 Martin Luther King made , what is arguably, the greatest American political speech of the twentieth- century. In this work the literary and political background to the speech is analyzed. There is also analysis of the subsequent historical and political use made of the speech. King 's monumental speech was rich in the cadences of the Biblical prophets, and had two great turning moments. One was when he improvised the whole 'I have a dream' section. In this he articulated the American values of Justice and Freedom in a remarkably powerful way He concluded the speech by reciting 'My Country Tis of Thee' and taking the line ' Let Freedom Ring' and building with it to an another powerful all-
encompassing statement of fundamental American ideals.
Ballazan
Focus is on the famous 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech. A cut to the chase book like this is better than a ton of biographical volumes. More poli-sci, less personal life.