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eBook Kitchen Culture in America: Popular Representations of Food, Gender, and Race download

by Sherrie A. Inness

eBook Kitchen Culture in America: Popular Representations of Food, Gender, and Race download ISBN: 0812217357
Author: Sherrie A. Inness
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (September 26, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 296
ePub: 1865 kb
Fb2: 1540 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mbr azw lrf docx
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Exploring popular representations of food and gender in American society from .

Exploring popular representations of food and gender in American society from 1895 to 1970, these essays argue that kitchen culture accomplishes more than just passing down cooking skills and well-loved recipes from generation to generation. Kitchen Culture in America is a collection of essays that examine how women's roles have been shaped by the principles and practice of consuming and preparing food. The book also takes a look at the complex relationships among food, gender, class, and race or ethnicity-as represented, for example, in the popular Southern black Mammy figure.

Kitchen Culture in America is a collection of essays that examine how .

Kitchen Culture in America is a collection of essays that examine how women's roles have been shaped by the principles and practice of consuming and preparing food. Exploring popular representations of food and gender in American society from 1895 to 1970, these essays argue that kitchen culture accomplishes more than just passing down cooking skills and well-loved recipes from generation to generation.

Exploring popular representations of food and gender in American society from 1895 to. .Sherrie A. Inness is Distinguished Laura C. Harris Chair of Women's Studies at Denison University. Kitchen culture instructs women about how to behave like "correctly" gendered beings.

Sherrie A. Harris Chair of Women's Studies at Denison University

Sherrie A. She is the author of Tough Girls: Women Warriors and Wonder Women in Popular Culture, also published by the University of Pennsylvania Press; The Lesbian Menace: Ideology, Identity, and the Representation of Lesbian Life; and Intimate Communities: Representation and Social Transformation in Women's College Fiction, 1895-1910.

Kitchen Culture in America book. One chapter reveals how juvenile cookbooks, a popular genre for over a century, have taught boys and girls not only the basics of cooking, but also the fine distinctions between their expected roles as grown men and women.

Inness, Sherrie, Kitchen Culture in America: Popular Representations of Food, Gender, and Race (Philadelphia, 2001). Ireland, Lynne, ‘The Compiled Cookbook as Foodways Autobiography’, Western Folklore 40 (1981). tt, Barbara, ‘Recipes for Creating Community: The Jewish Charity Cookbook in America’, Jewish Folklore and Ethnology 9 (1987), 8–12. Leonardi, Susan, ‘Recipes for Reading: Summer Pasta, Lobster à la Riseholme, and Key Line Pie’, PMLA 104 (1989). Neuhaus, Jessamyn, Manly Meals and Mom’s Home Cooking: Cookbooks and Gender in Modern America (Baltimore, 2003).

Inness, Sherrie . ed. Kitchen Culture in America: Popular Representations of Food, Gender, and Race. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2001. Always Hungry, Never Greedy: Food and the Expression of Gender in a Melanesian Society. and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986. J. George Frederick, founder and first president of the New York Gourmet Society, established his leadership by creating "A Gourmet's Code of Modern Dining," published in his book, Cooking as Men Like It (1939).

At supermarkets across the nation, customers waiting in line—mostly female—flip through magazines displayed at the checkout stand. What we find on those magazine racks are countless images of food and, in particular, women: moms preparing lunch for the team, college roommates baking together, working women whipping up a meal in under an hour, dieters happy to find a lowfat ice cream that tastes great. In everything from billboards and product packaging to cooking shows, movies, and even sex guides, food has a presence that conveys powerful gender-coded messages that shape our society.

Kitchen Culture in America is a collection of essays that examine how women's roles have been shaped by the principles and practice of consuming and preparing food. Exploring popular representations of food and gender in American society from 1895 to 1970, these essays argue that kitchen culture accomplishes more than just passing down cooking skills and well-loved recipes from generation to generation. Kitchen culture instructs women about how to behave like "correctly" gendered beings. One chapter reveals how juvenile cookbooks, a popular genre for over a century, have taught boys and girls not only the basics of cooking, but also the fine distinctions between their expected roles as grown men and women.

Several essays illuminate the ways in which food manufacturers have used gender imagery to define women first and foremost as consumers. Other essays, informed by current debates in the field of material culture, investigate how certain commodities like candy, which in the early twentieth century was advertised primarily as a feminine pleasure, have been culturally constructed. The book also takes a look at the complex relationships among food, gender, class, and race or ethnicity-as represented, for example, in the popular Southern black Mammy figure. In all of the essays, Kitchen Culture in America seeks to show how food serves as a marker of identity in American society.