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eBook Life Amongst the Modocs: Unwritten History download

by Malcolm Margolin,Alan Rosenus,Joaquin Miller

eBook Life Amongst the Modocs: Unwritten History download ISBN: 0930588797
Author: Malcolm Margolin,Alan Rosenus,Joaquin Miller
Publisher: Urion Press (January 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 456
ePub: 1644 kb
Fb2: 1231 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: docx lit lrf rtf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Life Amongst The Modocs is a highly recommended addition to any Native .

Life Amongst The Modocs is a highly recommended addition to any Native American studies or Western American History reading list. Joaquin Miller, born Cincinnatus Hiner Miller in 1837, was a colorful, controversial, and important figure in early California literature. Malcolm Margolin is publisher of Heyday and author of several books on California history, including The Ohlone Way and The Way We Lived. Alan Rosenus, a historian and writer, has reintroduced a number of California classics, including The Indian History of the Modoc War, Joaquin Miller's Life Amongst the Modocs, and Selected Writings of Joaquin Miller.

Life Amongst the Modocs book. Life Amongst the Modocs: Unwritten History. 0930588797 (ISBN13: 9780930588793). Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Life Amongst the Modocs.

by. Miller, Joaquin, 1837-1913.

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Joaquin Miller Introduction by Malcolm Margolin Afterword by Alan Rosenus. First printed in 1873, Life Amongst the Modocs is based on Miller’s years among the mining towns and Indian camps of northernmost California during the tumultuous 1850s.

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First printed in 1873, Life Amongst the Modocs is based on Miller's years among the mining towns and Indian camps of northernmost California during the tumultuous 1850s

First printed in 1873, Life Amongst the Modocs is based on Miller's years among the mining towns and Indian camps of northernmost California during the tumultuous 1850s. As a nature writer, he was among the first to capture the fierce power and sublime beauty of California's wild landscape.

Life Amongst the Modocs: Unwritten History. Malcolm Margolin, Joaquin Miller. The American Indian Quarterly, January 1984, JSTOR. The authors haven't yet claimed this publication. PDF generated on 21-Dec-2019 Create your own PDF summaries at ww. rowkudos.

Joaquin Miller; Introduction by Malcolm Margolin; Afterword by Alan Rosenus. First printed in 1873, Life Amongst the Modocs is based on Miller’s years among the mining towns and Indian camps of northernmost California during the tumultuous 1850s

Joaquin Miller; Introduction by Malcolm Margolin; Afterword by Alan Rosenus. Capturing the fierce power and sublime beauty of California's wild landscape. As a nature writer, he was among the first to capture the fierce power and sublime beauty of California’s wild landscape.

116 - Let us - let us - fellow-miners, let us take a drink and advance upon the inemy. Библиографические данные. Unwritten History: Life Amongst the Modocs American novels of muckraking, propaganda, and social protest. Range around me. Rally to the bar and take a drink, every man of you, at me own ixpense.

Joaquin Miller1 ਜਨਵਰੀ 1873. Richard Bentley and Son, publishers in ordinary to Her Majesty. The Complete Poetical Works of Joaquin Miller. Forty-nine: An Idyl Drama of the Sierras (in Four Acts).

First printed in 1873, Life Amongst the Modocs is based on Miller’s years among the mining towns and Indian camps of northernmost California during the tumultuous 1850s. As a nature writer, he was among the first to capture the fierce power and sublime beauty of California’s wild landscape. He was also a maverick in his portrayal of the state’s emotional landscape, dealing as no one has before or since with themes such as loneliness and defeat, melancholy and rage, weakness and strength, joy and loyalty.
Comments: (6)
Oso
Joaquin Miller was born a mile north of my home town, Liberty, Indiana. I decided to read some of his books, starting with True Bear Stories. It was good, but this one is even better. The sympathy and understanding of the Indians (as we traditionally call them) is astonishing. The nature of the life people led back then comes through brilliantly. What astonishes me is that his writing is freshly different from other authors. I'm very happy to be reading it - I'm not even done yet. The intense nature of the scenes comes across vividly, a bit like, but more real than, the Westerns we once saw so frequently in the theaters. This is gritty, poetic, and altogether stimulating.
Small Black
It is wonderful to read a novel written in it's day to get a true understanding of life in the Northern California.
I selected it to help in understanding the period in time when my Great-great grandparents immigrated and settled in Northern California. The book portrays the challenges, lifestyle and hardships they faced during this time period.
This book is a real historical view of California's gold mining life and times. It clarifies the sacrifices and traumas the indigenous people, the Modocs and many other tribes faced and how their lives were dessimated by the settlers. It defines how their way of life was dessimated and would never be the same due to the settler's disconnection to nature, it's natural resources and lack of respect for it's people.
Zacki
Loved the rustic descriptions and accounts of primative life and actions between the indians and gold seekers. Joaquin Miller was in the ironic position of being married to an indian woman and was attacked by miners and was also park of a posse that attacked indians in retaliation for a precious attack by their tribe. Some chilling accounts of the harsh treatment of the natives by the gold seekers.

If you have an interest in California, gold rush era, indians or 1850 travel and living conditions , this is a very entertaining book.

Scott
Qudanilyr
Being interested already in the indigenous Amerind peoples of northern California, I picked up this book hoping for good descriptions of the Modoc people, their lifeways and their history. But this writer is too impressed with his own role in the story, the more so as the book wears on, to put out anything of anthropological value.

Herein, Miller describes his life among the California goldfields as well as among the Shasta and Modoc tribes inhabiting the mountains around Mt. Shasta. He gives an insightful description of the troubles, including the Modoc War, from the perspective of the besieged defenders.

Through it all he intersperses his very naive and often hypocritical philosophies for his paying readers to admire.

He ends the book by lauding life in the mountains, whence he swears he will never leave, and excoriating civilization, before suddenly abandoning his cabin in the mountains to live the rest of his days in London society.
Brol
Joaquin Miller is a somewhat forgotten author, to the extent that a man with schools and parks named after him can be forgotten. You'd probably have to admit though that it's rare to hear his work discussed much nowadays. There was a time though when he was immensely popular,especially in Europe. In fact, for a time it appears he provided European readers with their vision of what the American West was and had become. Miller is often called The Poet of the Sierras, and after reading this book, I gained an understanding of how he earned this title. From the opening line in this book describing Mt. Shasta as "Lonely as god and white as a winter moon..." and throughout the work he beautifully describes the land and the people of Northern California during the gold rush days and beyond.

Miller was clearly a progressive thinker and he takes some stands regarding the native American population that were likely unpopular in his day. Besides marrying a native American woman in the book and raising a child with her, he also advocates for a sovereign nation for native Americans that would include good and productive lands. He also touches on the damage miners did to the environment and how it affected native populations in his account of the battle of Castle Crags. Miller fought in this battle, which was the last battle in which native Americans used only primitive weapons. Miller was shot in the face with an arrow but recovered.

Overall the book is a fantastically written account of a very adventurous life during a time when there wasn't much law. I have a copy of this book that I take with me when backpacking because I live near many of the places that Miller describes.

It is difficult to know how much of this book is truth and how much is fiction. Miller did indeed live in these areas, and appears to have married a native American woman at some point in his life. But Miller places himself into nearly every significant historical event in far Northern California and I find this to be highly unlikely. In addition, he is inconsistent, at times advocating for Native American rights and then describing taking part in a massacre involving the Pitt River indians. But, such inconsistency is a hallmark of those times and whether or not this story is 50 percent true or 100 percent true matters not to me. It's a great read and I would highly recommend it as an introduction to Joaquin Miller's work.
Faehn
It's been almost 20 years since I read this book and the author's passion has stayed with me. I'm going to have to read it again and write a longer review; it just seemed odd that there were no customer reviews for such an important work.