carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Gender, Generation and Poverty: Exploring the ‘feminisation of Poverty' in Africa, Asia and Latin America

eBook Gender, Generation and Poverty: Exploring the ‘feminisation of Poverty' in Africa, Asia and Latin America download

by Sylvia Chant

eBook Gender, Generation and Poverty: Exploring the ‘feminisation of Poverty' in Africa, Asia and Latin America download ISBN: 1843769921
Author: Sylvia Chant
Publisher: Edward Elgar Pub (April 26, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 428
ePub: 1554 kb
Fb2: 1225 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: rtf lit lrf lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

of Poverty’ in Africa, Asia and Latin America by Sylvia Chant, 2007. The concepts, terms, policies, methodologies, implications and scenarios of three case study countries are critically analyzed. The book spends considerable time on this which.

The 'feminisation of poverty' is widely viewed as a global trend, and of particular concern in developing regions

The 'feminisation of poverty' is widely viewed as a global trend, and of particular concern in developing regions. Yet although popularisation of the term may have raised women's visibility in development discourses and gone some way to 'en-gender' policies for poverty reduction, the construct is only weakly substantiated. Its over-emphasis on income and on female household headship also conveys little of the contemporary complexities of gendered disadvantage.

Gender, Generation and Poverty book. Start by marking Gender, Generation and Poverty: Exploring the 'Feminisation of Poverty' in Africa, Asia and Latin America as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Sylvia H. Chant. Gender, Generation and Poverty: Exploring the 'Feminisation of Poverty' in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Gender, Generation and Poverty: Exploring the ‘Feminisation of Poverty’ in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Cheltenham, UK, 2007, 428 pp. £8. 5 ISBN 6 992 7 (cased), £2. 5 ISBN 978 1 84376 993 4 (paperback). Authors and affiliations. Among the familiar ones are the powerful magic wand of girls’ education (. Blumberg 1995; Ledgerwood 1999), the magic bullet of participation (. Schneider and World Bank 1996; for critiques, see Cooke and Kothari 2001; Edwards and Hulme 1995.

Gender, generation and poverty: exploring the feminisation of poverty in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Rethinking the feminization of poverty in relation to aggregate gender indices. Edward Elgar Publishing, 2007. American Anthropologist 107 (4), 738, 2005. The women, gender and development reader. Journal of human development 7 (2), 201-220, 2006. Mainstreaming men into gender and development: Debates, reflections, and experiences. SH Chant, MC Gutmann.

Gender, Generation and Poverty : Exploring the Feminisation of Poverty in Africa, Asia and Latin America. In Gender, Generation and Poverty Sylvia Chant challenges the 'feminisation of poverty' on the basis of recent fieldwork in The Gambia, Philippines and Costa Rica.

The 'feminisation of poverty' is viewed as a global trend, and of particular concern in developing regions. Yet although popularisation of the term may have raised women's visibility in development discourses and gone some way to 'en-gende. The 'feminisation of poverty' is viewed as a global trend, and of particular concern in developing regions.

In Gender, Generation and Poverty Sylvia Chant challenges the ‘feminisation of poverty’ on the basis of recent fieldwork in The Gambia, Philippines and Costa Rica

In Gender, Generation and Poverty Sylvia Chant challenges the ‘feminisation of poverty’ on the basis of recent fieldwork in The Gambia, Philippines and Costa Rica. Interviews with over 220 women and men of different ages at the grassroots, as well as with 40 professionals in international agencies, government departments and NGOs, highlight the difficulties of establishing any general tendency towards a widening of gender disparities in income poverty, or for female household heads to be the ‘poorest of the poor’.

Feminization of poverty is a phenomenon referring to the widening gap between women and men caught in a sequence of economic deprivation and scarcity. This phenomenon is not only a consequence of lack of income, but is also the result of the deprivation of capabilities and gender biases present in both societies and governments. It covers the poverty of choices and opportunities such as the ability to lead a long, healthy, and creative life, and enjoying basic rights like freedom, respect, and dignity.

The 'feminisation of poverty' is widely viewed as a global trend, and of particular concern in developing regions. Yet although popularisation of the term may have raised women's visibility in development discourses and gone some way to 'en-gender' policies for poverty reduction, the construct is only weakly substantiated. Its over-emphasis on income and on female household headship also conveys little of the contemporary complexities of gendered disadvantage.