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eBook Rainforest Warriors: Human Rights on Trial (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) download

by Richard Price

eBook Rainforest Warriors: Human Rights on Trial (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) download ISBN: 0812221370
Author: Richard Price
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (January 4, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 280
ePub: 1709 kb
Fb2: 1198 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw docx txt lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Rainforest Warriors is, for activists and jurists, a lesson; for perpetrators of human rights violations, a warning; and for academics, journalists, and anyone else whose career depends on fieldwork, a hope that our work ca. .

Rainforest Warriors is, for activists and jurists, a lesson; for perpetrators of human rights violations, a warning; and for academics, journalists, and anyone else whose career depends on fieldwork, a hope that our work can one day reciprocate the favors of our host communities and study 'subjects. Richard Price divides his time between rural Martinique and the College of William and Mary, where he is Duane A. and Virginia S. Dittman Professor of American Studies and Professor of Anthropology and History. His award-winning books include First-Time, Alabi's World, The Convict and the Colonel, and Travels with Tooy.

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010. Such shortcomings aside, the book will interest scholars and advocates interested in human rights, environmentalism, social movements (in particular Latin American Afro-descendant campaigns), the evolution of international human rights law, and the increasingly important role of international institutions like the UN and the InterAmerican Court.

Winner the 2012 Best Book Award in human rights from the American Political Science Association. Rainforest Warriors is, for activists and jurists, a lesson; for perpetrators of human rights violations, a warning; and for academics, journalists, and anyone else whose career depends on fieldwork, a hope that our work can one day reciprocate the favors of our host communities and study 'subjects. An extraordinary work of remarkable depth and consequence.

Richard Price, Maroon Societies: Rebel Slave Communities in the Americas. New York: Doubleday/Anchor, 1973. Eric J. Hobsbawm, Escaped Slaves of the Forest. Diaspora 1(1991):261-284; Michel-Rolph Trouillot, The Caribbean Region: An Open Frontier in Anthropological Theory.

Richard Price and his wife Sally Price have lived with and studied Saramaka maroons, descendants of self-liberated African slaves, who . Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010.

Richard Price and his wife Sally Price have lived with and studied Saramaka maroons, descendants of self-liberated African slaves, who live in the rainforest of the Republic of Suriname, for over 40 years. 280 pp. American Ethnologist 40, no. 2 (May 10, 2013): 399-400.

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Human Rights, Culture and Context: Anthropological Perspectives. Alex Conte, Scott Davidson, and Richard Burchill, Defining Civil and Political Rights: The Jurisprudence of the United Nations Human Rights Committee. Richard Wilson (e. - 1997 - Pluto Press. The Human Right to a Green Future: Environmental Rights and Intergenerational Justice. Richard P. Hiskes - 2008 - Cambridge University Press. The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights: An Overview. Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo - 2015 - In Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (ed., Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights.

Falling within the second perspective and carving its own genre therein, Richard Price’s Rainforest Warriorsis a story about extraordinary people who, because of their special relationship to their forest and the multiplying threats against it, used the Inter-American framework.

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010 Michael S. Wilson. Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014. Falling within the second perspective and carving its own genre therein, Richard Prices Rainforest Warriors is a story about extraordinary people who, because of their special relationship to their forest and the multiplying threats against it, used the Inter- American framework of human rights law to enact social change, the ripples of which will reach far beyond their particular communities.

Rainforest Warriors is a historical, ethnographic, and documentary account of a people, their threatened rainforest, and their successful attempt to harness international human rights law in their fight to protect their way of life—part of a larger story of tribal and indigenous peoples that is unfolding all over the globe.The Republic of Suriname, in northeastern South America, contains the highest proportion of rainforest within its national territory, and the most forest per person, of any country in the world. During the 1990s, its government began awarding extensive logging and mining concessions to multinational companies from China, Indonesia, Canada, and elsewhere. Saramaka Maroons, the descendants of self-liberated African slaves who had lived in that rainforest for more than 300 years, resisted, bringing their complaints to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.In 2008, when the Inter-American Court of Human Rights delivered its landmark judgment in their favor, their efforts to protect their threatened rainforest were thrust into the international spotlight. Two leaders of the struggle to protect their way of life, Saramaka Headcaptain Wazen Eduards and Saramaka law student Hugo Jabini, were awarded the Goldman Prize for the Environment (often referred to as the environmental Nobel Prize), under the banner of "A New Precedent for Indigenous and Tribal Peoples."Anthropologist Richard Price, who has worked with Saramakas for more than forty years and who participated actively in this struggle, tells the gripping story of how Saramakas harnessed international human rights law to win control of their own piece of the Amazonian forest and guarantee their cultural survival.

Winner of the 2012 ?Best Book Prize? for Human Rights from the American Political Science Association and the 2012 Senior Book Prize of the American Ethnological Society.