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eBook Poverty and Problem-Solving under Military Rule: The Urban Poor in Lima, Peru (Latin American monographs ; no. 51) download

by Henry A. Dietz

eBook Poverty and Problem-Solving under Military Rule: The Urban Poor in Lima, Peru (Latin American monographs ; no. 51) download ISBN: 029276460X
Author: Henry A. Dietz
Publisher: University of Texas Press; 1st edition (April 1, 1980)
Language: English
Pages: 300
ePub: 1278 kb
Fb2: 1617 kb
Rating: 4.3
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Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Poverty and Problem-Solving under Military Rule : The Urban Poor in Lima, Peru.

Poverty and Problem-Solving under Military Rule : The Urban Poor in Lima, Peru. Select Format: Hardcover. Yet few studies examine how military regimes react to the political pressures that wide-spread urban poverty creates or how the poor operate under authoritative rule.

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Poverty and problem-solving under military rule: the urban poor in Lima, Peru. The script of urban surgery: Lima, 1850–1940". New York: Routledge, 2002, pp. 170–192. Austin : University of Texas Press, 1980. The upper classes and their upper stories: architecture and the aftermath of the Lima earthquake of 1746". Household coping strategies and urban poverty in a comparative perspective

Poverty and problem-solving under military rule: The urban poor in Lima, Peru. Austin: University of Texas Press. The poverty of revolution: The state and the urban poor in Mexico. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. The free market city: Latin American urbanization in the years of the neoliberal experiment. Studies in Comparative National Development, 40(1), 43–82. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Household coping strategies and urban poverty in a comparative perspective. In M. Gottdiener and C. Pickvance (ed., Urban life in transition, 135–68. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

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Books Published: POVERTY AND PROBLEM-SOLVING UNDER MILITARY RULE: THE URBAN POOR IN PERU. Voting Patterns Among the Urban Poor in 1985 and 1986 in Peru. Presented at the Latin American Studies Association Meeting, New Orleans, March 1988. Austin: The University of Texas Press, 1980. Pobreza y participacion politica bajo un regimen militar. Lima: Universidad del Pacifico, 1986. Ethnicity, integration, and the military. Boulder, CO: Westview, 1991. Sendero Luminoso: Its Generalizabilities and Idiosyncracies.

In book: Urban Segregation and Governance in the Americas, p. -20. Poverty and Problem-Solving under Military Rule: The Urban Poor in Lima, Peru. Cite this publication.

Poverty and Problem-Solving under Military Rule: The Urban Poor in Lima, Peru by Henry A. Dietz (pp. 427-428).

Many countries in Latin America have experienced both rapid urbanization and military involvement in politics. Yet few studies examine how military regimes react to the political pressures that wide-spread urban poverty creates or how the poor operate under authoritative rule.

Henry Dietz investigates Lima’s poor during the “revolution” of General Juan Velasco (1968–1975). His study examines both the structural conditions promoting poverty and the individual consequences of being poor. The poor join together in several ways to resolve politicized communal needs; Dietz’s data indicate that the local neighborhood plays a crucial role in determining modes of involvement.

Considerable attention is given to government attempts to encourage and control political activities by the poor. Dietz analyzes the failure of SINAMOS, the regime’s mobilization agency, and in so doing raises general questions about corporatist solutions to social problems.

The wide range of original survey, informant, and ethnographic data provides much new information on elite-mass relationships in contemporary Latin America. Dietz’s research illuminates much that is of concern to scholars and planners dealing with urbanization, poverty, and social policy formation.