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by Godfrey Mwakikagile

eBook Military Coups in West Africa Since the Sixties download ISBN: 1560729457
Author: Godfrey Mwakikagile
Publisher: Nova Science Pub Inc (June 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 247
ePub: 1848 kb
Fb2: 1781 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Godfrey Mwakikagile, although not a West African, has done a sweeping survey of the region and the devastation wrought by military rulers, as well as "elected" politicians, since the sixties. It is a very interesting study, even if not detailed in all cases. But that is understandable

Godfrey Mwakikagile, although not a West African, has done a sweeping survey of the region and the devastation wrought by military rulers, as well as "elected" politicians, since the sixties. But that is understandable.

Africa and The West (2000) Africans and African Americans: Complex Relations – Prospects and .

Africa and The West (2000) Africans and African Americans: Complex Relations – Prospects and Challenges (2009) Africa 1960 – 1970: Chronicle and Analysis (2009). Africa After Independence: Realities of Nationhood (2009). Elijah Mwakikagile (father) and Syabumi Mwakikagile (née Mwambapa, mother). Mwakikagile came to prominence after he wrote Nyerere and Africa: End of an Era - a major biographical book on the life of former Tanzanian President Julius Nyerere set in the backdrop of Africa's early post-colonial years and the liberation wars in the countries of southern Africa in which Nyerere played a major role.

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Military Coups in West Africa since the Sixties. Nova Publishers, 2001. xii + 247 pp. Bibliography.

Mwakikagile's first book, Economic Development in Africa, was published in 1999. Mwakikagile has written about Sankara in Military Coups in West Africa Since The Sixties and in African Countries among other works

Mwakikagile's first book, Economic Development in Africa, was published in 1999. He has maintained a steady pace since then, writing more than 40 books, mostly about Africa during the post-colonial period. Mwakikagile has written about Sankara in Military Coups in West Africa Since The Sixties and in African Countries among other works

Military Coups and Military Regimes in Africa. Southern African Journal of Military Studies 8 (4): 1–12. Mwakikagile, Godfrey. Military Coups in West Africa since the Sixties.

Military Coups and Military Regimes in Africa. Coups from Below: Armed Subalterns and State Power in West Africa. Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers. Nzongola-Ntalaja, Georges.

com wrote the following about Godfrey Mwakikagile: "He was one of the most promising intellectuals of our generation, and one of the most inspiring, to emerge out of the seventies, when he graduated from university.

When is a coup a coup? Since the 1950s, there've been a total of 206 coups attempts in Africa, according to a. .Burkina Faso, in West Africa, has had the most successful ones, with seven.

When is a coup a coup? Since the 1950s, there've been a total of 206 coups attempts in Africa, according to a dataset compiled by two US political scientists, Jonathan Powell and Clayton Thyne. Their definition of a coup is that they are illegal and overt attempts by the military or other civilian officials inside the state to unseat sitting leaders. Is Africa having fewer military takeovers? Africa has certainly had a high number of military takeovers, but this particular way of forcing change is, in fact, declining. Military coups in Africa.

The author looks at Africa in the sixties and at the major events which have shaped the destiny of the continent for decades since the .

The author looks at Africa in the sixties and at the major events which have shaped the destiny of the continent for decades since the end of colonial rule. Most of the countries had won independence by 1968. They were also years of military coups and assassinations as well as conflicts: the ouster of Kwame Nkrumah who led Ghana to become the first black African country to win independence; the Congo crisis including the secession of Katanga province and the assassination of Patrice Lumumba; the Nigerian civil war triggered by the secession of the Eastern Region which declared independence as the.

For three decades, since the sixties, military coups became a ritual of African politics. They consist of self-perpetuating incidents which spilled into the 1990's, through on a much smaller scale. This book is a chronological sequence of these events in West Africa. The focus is on the coups in sub-Saharan Africa during these turbulent decades, and what can be done to stop them in Africa's quest for democracy.
Comments: (3)
September
This is, to my knowledge, the first comprehensive study
of military governments in West Africa - in fact anywhere
in Africa - since independence in the sixties. Written
by an East African but who, because of his impressive
credentials and background as a journalist in Tanzania,
is no less qualified to handle the subject about West
Africa; the book is more than just a history of military
coups in West Africa. It is also a prescription for
ending military intervention in African politics, and a
call for consensus building to form governments of national
unity in order to end civil wars and unrest, and guarantee
full participation of all groups in the conduct of national
affairs, in all African countries. The corruption and
brutality of African leaders, both civilian and military,
and other abuses of power, are fully exposed in this book.
So is the involvement of the CIA in the ouster of Dr. Kwame
Nkrumah, the first president of Ghana and an ardent
Pan-Africanist who was also one of the most influential
African leaders in the 20th century. And tribalism, which
has caused so much chaos, misery, and suffering, and
which has been exploited by politicians across Africa,
also gets full attention in this book. In fact, ethnic
hatred almost destroyed Africa's largest and most
populous nation, Nigeria, during the civil war in the
sixties. It was, until then, the bloodiest conflict in
the history of post-colonial Africa. It is because of
this disruptive force of tribalism across the continent
that Africans should seriously consider forming coalition
governments in order to harmonize conflicting interests
in a pluralistic context. The book is well-written, and
well-documented, except for typographical errors here
and there the publisher should not have overlooked. Some
people may blame the author for this. But that shouldn't
be the case. Writers, write. And publishers, publish; and,
in the process, are responsible for what their typists
and copy editors do. So, apportion guilt accordingly.
And give credit where credit is due. There's no question
the author has written a very important book, covering
a lot of territory, and in an objective way as is humanly
possible.
Kage
Godfrey Mwakikagile has written a very important book about military coups in Africa. His focus on West Africa only enabled him to provide more details about this disturbing intrusion into politics by soldiers.
My own country, Ghana, was one of the first to fall under military rule back in February 1966 when Dr. Kwame Nkrumah was overthrown. In one of the longest and most important chapters in the book, the author provides a balanced account of military rule in Ghana, as well as a fitting tribute to Ghana's founding father President Nkrumah.
For decades since the sixties, as Mwakikagile shows in his book, many countries suffered under military dictatorship. In Ghana, Jerry Rawlings who comes from the same region I do, the Volta Region, ruled the longest. Although he did a lot of good things for the masses, he was also a harsh ruler. And no one elected him, until later. That's the point, as the author points out in his book. Soldiers do not have the mandate to rule.
And we just hope that they stop storming into office, anywhere in Africa. We are fed up with them, as much as we are with civilian tinpot dictators. And it's very good that the author has provided some of the solutions on how to discourage or stop soldiers from overthrowing governments, and also on how to get them, as well as civilian despots, out of office. And excellent book on how to use the power of the masses to achieve democracy in Africa.
Thomeena
I have lived under military rule in Nigeria. I know what the soldiers did. They destroyed our country. I also know what military rulers have done to other African countries, not just in West Africa. It has been a nightmare.
But what is so sad is that even the civilian rulers themselves have also destroyed our continent.The only difference is that they are elected, although in rigged elections, which is one of the reasons why soldiers overthrow governments. But the main reason why they do so is to become leaders themselves, and dictators, and thieves. It's such a shame! And an unconscionable waste of our resources.
Talk about theft? Look at Ibrahim Babangida, former Nigerian military dictator. He is one of the richest men in the world, and in history, having amassed a fortune of more than $30 billion within 8 years of his blood-soaked military dictatorship. He ruled from 1985 - 1993, and is still a major player on the Nigerian political scene even today, having bankrolled in 1999 the election of a fellow soldier, Olusegun Obasanjo, who was Nigeria's military head of state from 1979 - 1983.
Where did Babangida get all that money from? He siphoned off billions of petrodollars, and had most of it stashed away abroad, while the Ogoni and members of other nationalities (they are more than just "tribes") in the oil-producing regions of the Niger Delta got nothing. So did his successor, another tinpot military despot, Sani Abacha, who also stole billions - at least $4 billion within 5 years.
Godfrey Mwakikagile, although not a West African, has done a sweeping survey of the region and the devastation wrought by military rulers, as well as "elected" politicians, since the sixties. It is a very interesting study, even if not detailed in all cases. But that is understandable. Covering so many countries, and over such a long period of time, it would have been impossible for him to provide, in a single volume as this one, a detailed account of every military regime in West Africa during the past 40 years. The fact that he was able to focus on the major events, digest and distill all the information he was able to gather to produce such a readable and balanced account, is itself a major achievement.
But the pace at which he is going may also compromise his research. He writes at a brisk pace. He also does research at a brisk pace, based on what he has produced so far. Looking at the list of his works, he seems to have written 7 books within only three years, dealing with major subjects. There's no question that they required extensive research, and his works show that he did it. And since they are also used as college textbooks, there's no doubt that the professors who recommended them for purchase knew they were vital works. All these academics couldn't be wrong. And I believe they all made the right decision. But the writer would be well-advised to proceed with caution when tackling major themes, the kind he has, with the hope that he will provide even more valuable insights into the subjects he addresses; which he undoubtedly can, as one can tell from reading his book. It is a product of a highly analytical mind. And as a fellow African, I am proud of him.
"Military Coups in West Africa since the Sixties" is an invaluable work, choke-full of facts, and well-balanced, by one of our important African writers from Tanzania. The only criticism I have has to do with typographical errors which may even tarnish the author's reputation especially as an academic author, although this is not his fault, as anyone who knows about book publishing will tell you. The publisher should be taken to task for this, while the author should be given all the credit he's duly entitled to, for writing one of the most important books - not only about military coups, but about Africa as a whole since the sixties.