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eBook Clan Cleansing in Somalia: The Ruinous Legacy of 1991 (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) download

by Lidwien Kapteijns

eBook Clan Cleansing in Somalia: The Ruinous Legacy of 1991 (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) download ISBN: 0812244672
Author: Lidwien Kapteijns
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (November 30, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1528 kb
Fb2: 1541 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: doc mobi lit rtf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

In 1991, certain political and military leaders in Somalia, wishing to gain exclusive control over the state.

In 1991, certain political and military leaders in Somalia, wishing to gain exclusive control over the state. The best book about recent events in Somalia is undoubtedly Clan Cleansing in Somalia, by Lidwien Kapteijns, a must-read for anyone wanting to unravel the complicated nature of our civil wa. -Nuruddin Farah, New York Times. -World Peace Foundation.

Clan Cleansing in Somalia establishes that public acknowledgment of the ruinous turn to communal violence is. .

Clan Cleansing in Somalia establishes that public acknowledgment of the ruinous turn to communal violence is indispensable to social and moral repair, and can provide a gateway for the critical memory work required from Somalis on all sides of this multifaceted conflict. Manipulating clan sentiment, they succeeded in turning ordinary civilians against neighbors, friends, and coworkers.

Article in Northeast African Studies 14(1):157-162 · January 2014 with 17 Reads. Cite this publication.

Clan Cleansing in Somalia The Ruinous Legacy of 1991. A brilliant book that reopens some of the central questions of Somali history and politics in a compelling manner. -Journal of African History.

In Clan Cleansing: The Ruinous Legacy of 1991, Lidwien Kapteijns sets out to offer an analysis of what .

In Clan Cleansing: The Ruinous Legacy of 1991, Lidwien Kapteijns sets out to offer an analysis of what she considers as the "unspeakable" moment: the 1991-1992 Somali clan wars. This is an attempt to bite off more than what one could easily chew; however, Kapteijns narrates the partial effects of the clan wars, rather than the causes. Kapteijns's narrative begins with fact-that a war started in January 1991-but contaminates realities and distorts known facts before it ends with fiction, full of imaginary tales, not out of line with what one could aptly call only another narrative in the world of narratives.

Clan Cleansing in Somalia: The Ruinous Legacy of 1991. by Lidwien Kapteijns

Clan Cleansing in Somalia: The Ruinous Legacy of 1991. by Lidwien Kapteijns. Clan Cleansing in Somalia establishes that public acknowledgment of the ruinous turn to communal violence is indispensable to social and moral repair, and can provide a gateway for the critical memory work required from Somalis on all sides of this multifaceted conflict. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Published in: Education.

Clan Cleansing in Somalia book. Lidwien Kapteijns is Professor of History at Wellesley College.

In 1991, certain political and military leaders in Somalia, wishing to gain exclusive control over the state, mobilized their followers to use terror—wounding, raping, and killing—to expel a vast number of Somalis from the capital city of Mogadishu and south-central and southern Somalia. Manipulating clan sentiment, they succeeded in turning ordinary civilians against neighbors, friends, and coworkers. Although this episode of organized communal violence is common knowledge among Somalis, its real nature has not been publicly acknowledged and has been ignored, concealed, or misrepresented in scholarly works and political memoirs—until now. Marshaling a vast amount of source material, including Somali poetry and survivor accounts, Clan Cleansing in Somalia analyzes this campaign of clan cleansing against the historical background of a violent and divisive military dictatorship, in the contemporary context of regime collapse, and in relationship to the rampant militia warfare that followed in its wake.

Clan Cleansing in Somalia also reflects on the relationship between history, truth, and postconflict reconstruction in Somalia. Documenting the organization and intent behind the campaign of clan cleansing, Lidwien Kapteijns traces the emergence of the hate narratives and code words that came to serve as rationales and triggers for the violence. However, it was not clans that killed, she insists, but people who killed in the name of clan. Kapteijns argues that the mutual forgiveness for which politicians often so lightly call is not a feasible proposition as long as the violent acts for which Somalis should forgive each other remain suppressed and undiscussed. Clan Cleansing in Somalia establishes that public acknowledgment of the ruinous turn to communal violence is indispensable to social and moral repair, and can provide a gateway for the critical memory work required from Somalis on all sides of this multifaceted conflict.

Comments: (7)
LoboThommy
This is a very well-written historic document that describes the 1991 Somali genocide in an evidential and investigative manner. Perhaps something for the ICC Haag to closely examine.
Tejar
An original work on Somalia recent political history. As someone who has experienced first hand the clan cleansing in Mogadishu I attest to this scholarly work
Nnulam
Didn't meet my expectations, the author's perspective is heavily one sided in a civil war that devastated the lives of many. I was surprised how the man made famine in the reverine and inter-revirine regions that attracted the International military intervention was downplayed in the book. I wish it was written with a neutiral mindset.
Ganthisc
On 17 January 2013, US Foreign Secretary Hillary Clinton and the newly-elected president of Somalia, Hassan Sheikh Mohamud announced that the USA recognized a newly-formed Somali government for the first time since 1991. But in the same week the Somali al-Shabaab movement executed a French national they had held since 2009, after French efforts to free him failed. Where does Somalia stand now?
Readers like me know little about the collapse of Somalia in 1991, its long gestation and horrific aftermath, except for dramatic TV-footage or novelist Nuruddin Farah's two trilogies about his country of birth. `Human Love' (2006) by Russian-born, French author Andreï Makine (AM) is another book linking fiction with history. His brilliant novel about the Cold War in Africa is supposedly written by a nameless KGB-near Soviet journalist. In its final 30+ pages, he pictures the surge of rebellion against the weakened Somali strongman Syad Barre. AM writes about lengthy, failed Soviet negotiations with members of the Manifesto group to bring about an organized, bloodless transition. In his novel they are said to have been willing to sign a pact with the Soviet Union, America, the Devil, to whoever could most quickly provide the most arms and funding. Adding that they came across as insecure of themselves, not tough enough and that soon real warlords would make themselves felt, men who would not have their hesitations. And that neither SU nor US intelligence had a clue about what was happening...

Who made up this Manifesto group and who were these real warlords?

Dr. Lidwien Kapteijns answers these and many other questions in a carefully-researched study about the dramatic years of 1991-2, examining their historical roots and immediate aftermath. She states her objectives in a strongly-worded Introduction, which some readers may find rather abstract. But the conceptual framework is applied rigorously throughout the study and turns out to really make good sense. By studying Somali poetry, a core cultural tradition, she succeeds in getting a grip on the myths preceding the fall of Barre in 1991. And also, but more discreetly, on poetry's role during the clan-based warfare and the intense suffering of non-combatants which continues to the present day, despite the hopeful signs mentioned at the start of this review.
Another major objective of her study is to convince and offer evidence to opinion leaders in Somalia and in the worldwide Somali diaspora that what happened in 1991 was not a freak incident, but a planned, albeit not inevitable event. Her reconstruction is based on a wide range of available, more or less credible sources, with each assertion carefully backed by sources. Her claim that the assault on Mogadishu was engineered and that its planning had deep roots in earlier state violence against selected parts of its own people, is convincing and backed by numerous sources.
In 1991, Somalia was viewed as having a single language, culture and faith, with a mythical forefather whose male children formed clans and sub-clans. The clans and their interaction were Dr. Kapteijns' main units of study; only outsiders like this reader deplore the absence of a diagram showing the clans' position relative to each other. Understandably, only a few examples of hate narratives or incendiary poems are included. Her book is based on tons of carefully-chosen data, using different genres of Somali poetry sparingly and in a non-confrontational manner, but to great effect; she has combed the Somali blogosphere, the written press and press releases from Somali and other radio stations and interviewed eye-witnesses of the events in 1991 in Djibouti, Ethiopia, Yemen and in the Western diaspora in person or by telephone.
Dr. Kapteijns tells a complicated story backed by an awesome body of evidence for a work aimed at reconciliation, with many cross-cutting issues and plenty of intelligent questions asked and moral issues to be considered and anticipated. Rich book. Not a word out of place.
Majin
Kapteijn's book was excellent not only in the ways it posed very difficult questions around identity and history, but in the way it attempted to give thoughtful answers.

The book is a very significant contribution to the field of Somali history in the ways that it names names and gives context in a fair and measured way, recognizing the burden and responsibility of doing this. This work emerges out of decades of studying Somali history by the author, as well as from engagement in African history more broadly over the course of an entire career. It shows! As a non-Somali, previously, I had avoided the use of clan as an all-important category in the context of Somali history, because I did not want to fall into the trap of focusing disproportionately on clan and perpetrators and victims I did not understand. In daily life, I will continue to do so. However, after Dr Kapteijn's book I feel as though I better understand the ways that clan has been produced as a divisive category, and the ways that engaging in incredibly difficult events may present a way forward for the peace process.
Fohuginn
I bought this book about five years ago. It is a well researched book. And the clan cleansing is largely responsible of the country's total disintegration. If the USC did not launch its barbaric atrocities against Darod civilians in the capital, Somalia would not have descended into total chaos. There are numerous factors that contributed to the total disintegration of Somalia's institutions, but this genocide played a pivotal role.
Owomed
It was very detailed, what had transpired directly and behind the scenes. I always thought that I knew a lot…being a survivor of the ugly clan cleansing war. I want to thank and compliment Lidwien Kapteijns (Ladan) for doing this research and accounting what could have been buried or still denied after 22 years.