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eBook No Peace, No War: An Anthropology of Contemporary Armed Conflicts download

by Paul Richards

eBook No Peace, No War: An Anthropology of Contemporary Armed Conflicts download ISBN: 0852559356
Author: Paul Richards
Publisher: James Currey (October 14, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1682 kb
Fb2: 1780 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit azw mbr docx
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

No Peace, No War. An Anthropology of Contemporary Armed Conflicts. Oxford: James Currey.

Initially trained in human geography (BSc Queen Mary University of London, 1963–1966) and African Studies (MA SOAS, 1966-1967), he taught in Ibadan, Nigeria before completing a PhD in geography and specialising in Sierra Leone (PhD London, 1973–1977). No Peace, No War.

A rash Of Small Wars Erupted after the Cold War ended in Africa, the Balkans, and other parts of the former communist world. has been added to your Cart. The wars were in "inter-zones.

No Peace No War book.

War, he tells us, must be seen as "a social process," and "if we are to understand war and peace in. .

War, he tells us, must be seen as "a social process," and "if we are to understand war and peace in processual terms we must first comprehend the practices of war and peace: how people mobilize and organize for war, and the role played by ideational factors in such mobilization and organization. The emphasis, therefore, must not be on "what triggered war" but "on exploring how people make war and peace" (13).

It has become a behavioural problem. Like a disease, the risk of infection must be contained. This book takes a different approach. Anthropologists who have lived with and through the wars they describe here reflect a paradoxical assumption that to understand war we must deny it a special status. Rather than quarantine war and leave it to security specialists they attempt to grasp its character as but one among many phases or aspects of social reality, organised by social agents, made through social.

Ohio University Press. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 8 x . 4 x . 6 Inches.

The anthropology of war covers a broad range of topics of high relevance to understand contemporary armed conflicts and . Richards P (2005) No peace, no war: an anthropology of contemporary armed conflicts. Ohio University Press, AthensGoogle Scholar

The anthropology of war covers a broad range of topics of high relevance to understand contemporary armed conflicts and humanitarian crises  . Ohio University Press, AthensGoogle Scholar. Robben A, Nordstrom C (1995) Fieldwork under fire: contemporary studies of violence and survival. University of California Press, BerkeleyGoogle Scholar. Robben A, Suarez-Orozco M (2000) Cultures under siege: collective violence and trauma.

No peace, no war: the anthropology of contemporary armed conflicts

No peace, no war: the anthropology of contemporary armed conflicts. We conclude that, despite scope for criticism of its relevance in contemporary operations, the non-combatant status for medical personnel highlights our commitment to alleviating suffering in armed conflict, and provides a vital legal basis to protect those who serve to treat the sick and injured. The ultimate beneficiaries of this protected status for medical personnel are our patients themselves.

No peace, no war: the anthropology of contemporary armed conflicts. To fight or to farm? Agrarian dimensions of the Mano River conflicts (Liberia and Sierra Leone). African Affairs 104 (417), 571-590, 2005.

No peace, no war. Published 2006 by James Currey ; Ohio University Press, James Currey in Athens, OH. Written in English.

For most commentators, 'new war' is 'mindless' mass action. It has become a behavioural problem. Like a disease, the risk of infection must be contained. This book takes a different approach. Anthropologists who have lived with and through the wars they describe here reflect a paradoxical assumption that to understand war we must deny it a special status. Rather than quarantine war and leave it to security specialists they attempt to grasp its character as but one among many phases or aspects of social reality, organised by social agents, made through social action. All war is long-term struggle organised for political ends, and neither the means nor the ends can be understood without reference to a specific social context. North America: Ohio U Press