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eBook Retreating From the Cold War: Germany, Russia, and the Withdrawal of the Western Group of Forces download

by David Cox

eBook Retreating From the Cold War: Germany, Russia, and the Withdrawal of the Western Group of Forces download ISBN: 0814715281
Author: David Cox
Publisher: NYU Press; First Edition edition (May 1, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1830 kb
Fb2: 1658 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: docx lrf doc mbr
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Lataa offline-lukemista varten, korosta, lisää kirjanmerkkeihin tai kirjoita muistiinpanoja lukiessasi kohdetta Retreating from the Cold War: Germany, Russia and the Withdrawal of the Western Group of Forces. It focuses on the central role of these Soviet troops in the historic events that marked the end of the Cold War, including the East German revolution in 1989, German unification in 1990, and the final withdrawal of the troops themselves in 1994, events that were put in motion by Mikhail Gorbachev's reform effort in the USSR.

Retreating from the Cold War looks at the Soviet, and later Russian, military withdrawal from what was East Germany. Show all. About the authors. DAVID COX. Table of contents (7 chapters). Table of contents (7 chapters)

In this book, David Cox argues that the initial disagreements that led to the Cold War largely centered around Central/Eastern Europe, and Germany in particular

In this book, David Cox argues that the initial disagreements that led to the Cold War largely centered around Central/Eastern Europe, and Germany in particular. The end of the Cold War, according to Cox, can best be understood in the context of the withdrawal of Soviet forces and the disintegration of Soviet hegemony in these areas. In this insightful and original book, Co In this book, David Cox argues that the initial disagreements that led to the Cold War largely centered around Central/Eastern Europe, and Germany in particular.

Group of Soviet Forces in Germany (Western Group of Forces from 1989). Snetkov fought in World War II as a self-propelled artillery officer and during the Cold War rose to command positions. He commanded the 1st Guards Tank Army and served as first deputy commander of the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany during the 1970s. Snetkov led the Siberian Military District and the Leningrad Military District in the 1980s and in 1987 became commander of the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany (GSFG), which in 1989 became the Western Group of Forces as the Cold War wound down.

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It focuses on the central role of these Soviet troops in the historic events that marked the end of the Cold War, including the East German revolution in 1989, German unification in 1990, and the final withdrawal of the troops themselves in 1994, events that were put in motion by Mikhail Gorbachev's reform effort in the USSR.

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This book compares favorably with The Legacies of Communism in Eastern Europe (Johns Hopkins Univ. 1995) and David Cox's Retreating from the Cold War: Germany, Russia and the Withdrawal of the Western Group of Forces (New York Univ. Recommended for international and security relations collections in larger public and academic libraries.

Western European nations accepted Marshall's offer, while the Eastern European states followed Moscow's .

Western European nations accepted Marshall's offer, while the Eastern European states followed Moscow's lead. September 1971: Agreement to Reduce Risk of Nuclear War The United States and the Soviet Union signed an Agreement on Measures to Reduce the Risk of Outbreak of Nuclear War on September 30, 1971. It provided for nuclear safeguards, immediate notification of an unexplained nuclear detonation, and advance notice of missile launches.

In this book, David Cox argues that the initial disagreements that led to the Cold War largely centered around Central/Eastern Europe, and Germany in particular. The end of the Cold War, according to Cox, can best be understood in the context of the withdrawal of Soviet forces and the disintegration of Soviet hegemony in these areas.

In this insightful and original book, Cox examines the circumstances surrounding the Soviet Union's military retreat from Germany and Eastern Europe as a microcosm of the decline and collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Using Soviet, and later Russian press reports, as well as German accounts, Cox traces the origins on the Western Group of Forces (WGF) within the Soviet alliance system up to the beginning of Gorbachev's reforms and the consequences of these reforms on the Soviet position in Eastern Europe. He also examines Gorbachev's new political thinking in Soviet foreign policy, the East German Revolution, Moscow's relations with Germany, domestic Soviet politics and the WGF, and ultimately the end of the Cold War.