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eBook World Poverty and Human Rights download

by Thomas W. Pogge

eBook World Poverty and Human Rights download ISBN: 074564144X
Author: Thomas W. Pogge
Publisher: Polity; 2 edition (February 26, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1649 kb
Fb2: 1716 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lit azw mbr mobi
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Poverty and Human Rights. Our world is today very far from this ideal.

Poverty and Human Rights. Piecing together the current global record, we find that most of the current massive underfulfillment of human rights is more or less directly connected to poverty. The connection is direct in the case of basic social and economic human rights, such as the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of oneself and one’s family, including food, clothing, housing, and medical care.

World Poverty and Human . .has been added to your Cart. Pogge's gift is to recognize as imaginary the boundariesbetween economics and ethics. A striking example is thehistorically derived and currently dysfunctional way we applypatents for medicines. With simplicity and clarity, Pogge offers ananalysis without villains, a remedy without losers and a practicalpath to fundamental reform.

World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms is a 2002 book by Thomas Pogge

World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms is a 2002 book by Thomas Pogge.

However huge in human terms, the world poverty problem is tiny economically. Thomas Pogge seeks to explain how this belief is sustained

However huge in human terms, the world poverty problem is tiny economically. Just 1 percent of the national incomes of the high-income countries would suffice to end severe poverty worldwide. Thomas Pogge seeks to explain how this belief is sustained.

Thomas Pogge's book seeks to explain how this belief is sustained

Thomas Pogge's book seeks to explain how this belief is sustained. Part social science, part philosophy, World Poverty and Human Rights thoroughly outlines why citizens of the developed world have an ethical duty to help the global poor and makes modest policy recommendations to alleviate their maladies.

Pogge, Thomas (2002) World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms

Pogge, Thomas (2002) World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms. Cambridge: Polity Press. Pogge, Thomas (2004) ‘The First UN Millennium Development Goal: A Cause for Celebration?’, Journal of Human Development 5 (3): 377-397. This question is distinct from the question I raise in my book-namely, whether present citizens of the affluent countries, in collusion with the ruling elites of most poor countries, are harming the global poor.

This is where Thomas Pogge's extraordinary book on world poverty takes over. We must, Pogge says, stop thinking about global justice solely in terms of helping the poor. The poor need to be helped because of the injustices we inflict upon them. The sick and starving of the world are not merely dying, Pogge says. We are killing them, and we are killing them in huge numbers. Pogge criticizes the subsidies and trade barriers in rich countries that disable the economies of poor countries, and which the rich countries insist on in the WTO by using their vastly superior bargaining power. Nor is he impressed by the "voluntary" nature of the WTO.

Freedom from Poverty As a Human Right: Who Owes What to the Very Poor? Thomas W. Pogge. Global Financial Crisis: The Ethical Issues. Christian Barry, Thomas W. Recently Viewed and Featured.

Some 2.5 billion human beings live in severe poverty, deprived ofsuch essentials as adequate nutrition, safe drinking water, basicsanitation, adequate shelter, literacy, and basic health care. Onethird of all human deaths are from poverty-related causes: 18million annually, including over 10 million children underfive.However huge in human terms, the world poverty problem is tinyeconomically. Just 1 percent of the national incomes of thehigh-income countries would suffice to end severe povertyworldwide. Yet, these countries, unwilling to bear an opportunitycost of this magnitude, continue to impose a grievously unjustglobal institutional order that foreseeably and avoidablyperpetuates the catastrophe. Most citizens of affluent countriesbelieve that we are doing nothing wrong. Thomas Pogge seeks to explain how this belief is sustained. Heanalyses how our moral and economic theorizing and our globaleconomic order have adapted to make us appear disconnected frommassive poverty abroad. Dispelling the illusion, he also offers amodest, widely sharable standard of global economic justice andmakes detailed, realistic proposals toward fulfilling it. Thoroughly updated, the second edition of this classic bookincorporates responses to critics and a new chapter introducingPogge's current work on pharmaceutical patent reform.
Comments: (4)
Cheber
This book blew me away. I'm well-versed in philosophy and the arguments presented were superb!

Not only does Pogge bring new arguments, he has done an impressive amount of research.

He brings strong arguments that people in the developed countries ought to help the world's poorest. He concludes with explicit proposals for significantly decreasing extreme poverty and the gash inequalities present today.

BUY NOW, READ ASAP!
Sharpbringer
Good condition
Nirad
This should be mandatory reading for everyone.
Nilador
In 2004, 2.5 billion people, 40 per cent of humanity, were living in severe poverty. Every year, 18 million people, a third of all who die, die early from poverty-related causes.

In this brilliantly original study, Thomas Pogge, Professor of Philosophy and International Affairs at Yale University, shows how the rich countries' governments' policies cause the poverty. The world order they impose `foreseeably produces an avoidable massive human rights deficit'.

One reviewer called this book `an analysis without villains', but in fact Pogge shows that our governments, corporations and `those who represent us in WTO negotiations and at the IMF' are true villains. Doing harm foreseeably and avoidably is morally indefensible.

The shortfall is just $300 billion a year, less than one per cent of the rich countries' total gross national incomes. The rich countries' subsidies to their richest farmers were $300 billion in 2005. Their tariffs on manufactured imports from poor countries are four times higher than on those from other rich countries. In 2005, just $7.63 billion of the total $106.78 billion of aid went to basic social services - 0.02 per cent of the rich countries' combined GNP.

Pogge explains that we cannot excuse ourselves by blaming the poor countries or their rulers because "the national causal factors we most like to highlight - tyranny, corruption, coups d'état, civil wars - are encouraged and sustained by central aspects of the present global economic order." The IMF, the World Bank and the EU demand privatisation, which, as he points out, is a way for rulers to enrich themselves by selling public property: "the sale of public property really is an important causal contributor to the incidence of undemocratic government."

We are implicated because we let our rulers do this great harm to the poor. Pogge asks, why don't we find ending this poverty morally compelling? He exposes the self-deceptions that make this glaring injustice possible.

We should never endorse injustice, or give our vote to those who practise it. We have to take responsibility, take control, and end the poverty by ending the villainy.