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eBook Politics, Markets, and Grand Strategy: Foreign Economic Policies as Strategic Instruments download

by Lars S. Skalnes

eBook Politics, Markets, and Grand Strategy: Foreign Economic Policies as Strategic Instruments download ISBN: 0472110314
Author: Lars S. Skalnes
Publisher: University of Michigan Press (August 1, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1912 kb
Fb2: 1900 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: docx doc txt lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Start by marking Politics, Markets, and Grand Strategy: Foreign . Skålnes explains changes in foreign economic policy in terms of shifting strategic assessments regarding the importance of military support from allies

Start by marking Politics, Markets, and Grand Strategy: Foreign Economic Policies as Strategic Instruments as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Skålnes explains changes in foreign economic policy in terms of shifting strategic assessments regarding the importance of military support from allies. When states need military support from their allies to meet threats to their security, they will adopt discriminatory foreign economic policies in an attempt to strengthen alliance relations. When states can go it alone without military support, by contrast, they will not pursue foreign economic policies that discriminate in favor of either allies or other countries.

Foreign economic policies have long been used as a tool of grand strategy. This book usefully surveys the historical record but offers few surprises. Skalnes maintains that great powers have often used trade and other economic policies since the late nineteenth century to advance their security goals. Politics, Markets, and Grand Strategy: Foreign Economic Policies as Strategic Instruments. Foreign economic policies have long been used as a tool of grand strategy.

In answering these questions, Lars S. Skalnes stresses the international political importance of foreign economic policy, arguing that trade, foreign investment, and foreign aid policies are strategic instruments great powers use to manage political and military relations with allies an. . Skalnes stresses the international political importance of foreign economic policy, arguing that trade, foreign investment, and foreign aid policies are strategic instruments great powers use to manage political and military relations with allies and adversaries.

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Lars Skålnes's new book refocuses the attention of the field greatly by asking us to consider foreign economic policy as a core component of great-power grand strategy. The purposeful manipulation of foreign economic ties by national leaders, he argues, is not merely an ancillary instrument in the diplomatic kit of foreign policy elites. Indeed there may be times in which it is the central tool used by powers to secure their strategic objectives

Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. ARTICLE CITATION. H. Richard Friman, "Politics, Markets, and Grand Strategy: Foreign Economic Policies as Strategic Instruments. Lars S. Skalnes," The Journal of Politics 64, no. 2 (May, 2002): 669-670. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months.

foreign economic policies as strategic instruments. Strategic need and economic discrimination. German grand strategy, 1879-1914. French grand strategy, 1887-1914. Published 2000 by The University of Michigan Press in Ann Arbor. British grand strategy, 1919-39. grand strategy, 1945-67. Includes bibliographical references (p. 227-244) and index. 337. Library of Congress.

By Lars S. Sk{aa}lnes. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000. author {Brian M. Pollins}, year {2002} }. Brian M. Pollins.

Working Papers Journal Articles Books and Chapters Software Components. JEL codes New Economics Papers. The RePEc blog The RePEc plagiarism page.

Skålnes, Lars . 1959-: Politics, markets, and grand strategy : foreign economic policies as strategic instruments, (Ann Arbor : The University of Michigan Press, c2000) (page images at HathiTrust).

.Ska& Lars . 1959-). Books from the extended shelves: Skålnes, Lars .

Why do states sometimes discriminate in favor of certain states and at other times choose to pursue nondiscriminatory policies? In answering these questions, Lars S. Skålnes stresses the international political importance of foreign economic policy, arguing that trade, foreign investment, and foreign aid policies are strategic instruments great powers use to manage political and military relations with allies and adversaries.Skålnes explains changes in foreign economic policy in terms of shifting strategic assessments regarding the importance of military support from allies. When states need military support from their allies to meet threats to their security, they will adopt discriminatory foreign economic policies in an attempt to strengthen alliance relations. When states can go it alone without military support, by contrast, they will not pursue foreign economic policies that discriminate in favor of either allies or other countries. Discriminatory policies, Skalnes argues, are important strategic instruments for several reasons. First, they can be used to tie countries to a military alliance. Second, they are useful as signals of intention. Third, discriminatory policies may strengthen an ally militarily by increasing the economic resources available for military purposes.Skålnes provides detailed accounts of the grand strategies of Germany (1879-1914), France (1887-1914), Great Britain (1919-1939), and the United States (1945-1967).Politics, Markets, and Grand Strategy will be important reading for scholars and students in the fields of national security studies, international political economy, and economic history, and to economists working on problems associated with foreign investment and trade generally and customs union theory and discriminatory trade agreements specifically.Lars S. Skålnes is Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon.