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eBook Walking Away from Nuremberg: Just War and the Doctrine of Command Responsibility download

by Lawrence P. Rockwood

eBook Walking Away from Nuremberg: Just War and the Doctrine of Command Responsibility download ISBN: 1558495991
Author: Lawrence P. Rockwood
Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press (October 3, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1548 kb
Fb2: 1878 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr lrf mobi azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Lawrence Rockwood (born September 27, 1958) is a human rights and democratic socialist activist who is a former .

Lawrence Rockwood (born September 27, 1958) is a human rights and democratic socialist activist who is a former . Army counterintelligence officer. He was separated from the US Army because of his action as a military intelligence officer References. Lawrence P. Rockwood, By Dan Coughlin, in Haiti Progres, Vol. 12, no. 51, 20 March 1995) Archived 2012-11-16 at the Wayback Machine.

In September 1994, Lawrence P. Rockwood, then a counterintelligence officer with the .  . There is no other person as qualified as Lawrence Rockwood to write this study of just war and command responsibility in the American military. Shortly after arriving incountry, Captain Rockwood began receiving reports of human rights abuses at the local jails, including the murder of political prisoners. His academic qualifications are absolutely first rate, but that is not the point.

Walking away from nuremberg: just war and the doctrine of command responsibility in the . In September 1994, Lawrence P.

Walking away from nuremberg: just war and the doctrine of command responsibility in the american military profession. Rockwood. Army's Tenth Mountain Division, was deployed to Haiti as part of Operation Restore Democracy, th. More). The Allen Institute for Artificial IntelligenceProudly built by AI2 with the help of our.

Lawrence P. Download PDF book format. Military ethics United States Command of troops Just war doctrine War crimes

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Walking away from Nuremberg: just war and the doctrine of command responsibility. Just and unjust wars: a moral argument with historical illustrations. New York: Basic Books. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Lawrence Rockwood (re., the author of Walking Away from Nuremberg: Just War and the Doctrine of Command Responsibility,has organized the following letter from military figures to the American Psychological Association

Lawrence Rockwood (re., the author of Walking Away from Nuremberg: Just War and the Doctrine of Command Responsibility,has organized the following letter from military figures to the American Psychological Association.

And now the war. She was just bewildered, and would not live long Complete Works of . She was just bewildered, and would not live long. Poor, frail, tiny Hattie, receiving the Somers into her still, tiny old house. Then one day a man called and left a book and the little bundle of papers - a handful only - which the detectives had confiscated. Complete Works of .

This book stands alone in analyzing a war crime from Iraq that involved the murder of noncombatants, questionable rules of engagement, and the doctrine of command responsibility

This book stands alone in analyzing a war crime from Iraq that involved the murder of noncombatants, questionable rules of engagement, and the doctrine of command responsibility. Although it amounts to a murder mystery, the focus is on the Rules of Engagement, which is a topic that until now has been completely ignored in books about the war in Iraq.

In September 1994, Lawrence P. Rockwood, then a counterintelligence officer with the U.S. Army's Tenth Mountain Division, was deployed to Haiti as part of Operation Restore Democracy, the American-led mission to oust the regime of Raoul Cedras and reinstall President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Shortly after arriving in-country, Captain Rockwood began receiving reports of human rights abuses at the local jails, including the murder of political prisoners. He appealed to his superiors for permission to take action but was repeatedly turned down. Eventually, after filing a formal complaint with an army inspector general, he set off to inspect the jails on his own. The next day, Captain Rockwood found himself on a plane headed back to the United States, where he was tried by court-martial, convicted on several counts, and discharged from military service. In this book, Rockwood places his own experience within the broader context of the American military doctrine of "command responsibility"―the set of rules that holds individual officers directly responsible for the commission of war crimes under their authority. He traces the evolution of this doctrine from the Civil War, where its principles were first articulated as the "Lieber Code," through the Nuremberg trials following World War II, where they were reaffirmed and applied, to the present. Rockwood shows how in the past half-century the United States has gradually abandoned its commitment to these standards, culminating in recent Bush administration initiatives that in effect would shield American commanders and officials from prosecution for many war crimes. The Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo prison abuse scandals, the recently disclosed illegal CIA detention centers, the unprecedented policy of tolerating acts considered as torture by both international standards and U.S. military doctrine, and the recent cover-ups of such combat-related war crimes as the Haditha massacre of November 2005, all reflect an "official anti-humanitarian" trend, Rockwood argues, that is at odds with our nation's traditions and principles.
Comments: (2)
Fawrindhga
This is a great book that everyone should read. It spells out the sad situation of trying to be an ethical, moral person while doing a tough job. The author was a US Army Captain, a special agent in counter-intelligence. He tried to do his job in a real world tactical situation which called for quick action by his superiors. The US military command staff failed to act and many indigenous civilians suffered terribly and needlessly. Our military could have done the right thing and it failed. The author points out how our military court martial also failed to do their job of honoring his authenticated findings. The book spells out how atrocities occurred during WWII and the US led military trials found many German soldiers guilty of military crimes. Many hanged because of their crimes against humanity. The author of this book was discharged from the military. He probably should have risen to that of a high ranking general who could make sure that his soldiers didn't commit these types of crimes. The generals above him should have been held accountable and received courts marshal to review their criminal actions.
I write this as having served as a US Army Captain, Counter-intelligence. But I saw the writing on the wall and stepped down voluntarily to distance myself from all this. You may wish to reference http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Lai_Massacre which occurred in March 1968 in Viet Nam. Why does our great country allow our military to commit these types of crimes against other people? I can't serve my own country when it misbehaves so often and brazenly.
Read this book! Read about My Lai. Weep and then become determined to hold our military accountable for its actions . . . or inactions.
The author is an American patriot of the highest order. I salute him and our great nation. You can honor him by reading his good book!!
PS: I have never met the author or have any personal knowledge of him other than what the book gives.
Bearus
As a member of Veterans for Peace and a veteran myself, I wholeheartedly agree with the fact that the U.S has been responsible for countless atrocities abroad. I also agree that the U.S. has managed to develop a commonly accepted dogma that war is necessary while creating a military that seeks to cover up wrongdoing.

I wish this book addressed that. Instead, this is nothing more than a personal soapbox for Rockwood. The entirety of this novel could be summed up by saying, "My name is Lawrence. I think I'm amazing, and nothing is ever my fault."

There is a sore need for books that expose the true nature of war and American imperialism. Hopefully more competent authors take on that challenge.