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eBook Can We Say No?: The Challenge of Rationing Health Care download

by Henry Aaron,William B. Schwartz,Melissa Cox

eBook Can We Say No?:  The Challenge of Rationing Health Care download ISBN: 0815701209
Author: Henry Aaron,William B. Schwartz,Melissa Cox
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press (November 21, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 199
ePub: 1245 kb
Fb2: 1233 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr lrf rtf azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Bibliographic Citation. Journal of Health, Politics and Law 2007 June; 32(3): 539-543. Aaron, Henry . Schwartz, William . and Cox, Melissa (2005). Related Items in Google Scholar.

Bibliographic Citation. Весь DSpace Сообщества и коллекции Авторы Названия By Creation Date Эта коллекция Авторы Названия By Creation Date.

Rationing health care. A voice in the debate: Medicine and finances. The moral issue of economic rationing in health care

Examines the use of rationing as a means to curb health care spending, using the experience of Great Britain to highlight . On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

Examines the use of rationing as a means to curb health care spending, using the experience of Great Britain to highlight the promises and pitfalls of this approach" Provided by publisher. Personal Name: Schwartz, William . 1922-. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database.

Related books: Stephen Graham. Can We Say No?: The Challenge of Rationing Health Care by William B. Schwartz, With Melissa Cox Henry Aaron. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: William B. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres. Books ~~ Medicine~~ Health Policy.

This book argues that sensible health care rationing can not only save . Henry Aaron, William B. Schwartz. Brookings Institution Press, 21 нояб

This book argues that sensible health care rationing can not only save money but improve general welfare and public health. Brookings Institution Press, 21 нояб. Among his many books are Can We Say No? The Challenge of Rationing Health Care, with William B. Schwartz and Melissa Cox (Brookings, 2006), and Reforming Medicare: Options,Tradeoffs, and Opportunities, written with Jeanne Lambrew (Brookings, 2008).

In Can We Say No?, Henry Aaron and William B. Schwartz argue that sensible health care rationing . Schwartz argue that sensible health care rationing not only can save money, but that it can improve general welfare and public health, as well. Aaron and Schwartz, along with Melissa Cox, explain why serious consideration of health care rationing is advisable, even inescapable. Can We Say No? provides the information policymakers and concerned citizens need to think clearly about these difficult issues, engage in an informed debate, and formulate responsible, sustainable health care policies.

The Challenge of Rationing Health Care Book in PDF Format

The Challenge of Rationing Health Care Book in PDF Format. It's in the real estate agent the last time you bought or sold (or even rented) a house.

The Challenge of Rationing Health Care. This book argues that sensible health care rationing can not only save money but improve general welfare and public health

The Challenge of Rationing Health Care. This book argues that sensible health care rationing can not only save money but improve general welfare and public health. The choices the British have made point up the nature of the options Americans will face if they wish to keep public health care budgets from driving taxes ever higher and private health care spending from crowding out increases in other forms of worker compensation and consumption.

Over the past four decades, the share of income devoted to health care nearly tripled. If policy is unchanged, this trend is likely to continue. Should Americans decide to rein in the growth of health care spending, they will be forced to consider whether to ration care for the well-insured, a prospect that is odious and unthinkable to many. This book argues that sensible health care rationing can not only save money but improve general welfare and public health. It reviews the experience with health care rationing in Great Britain. The choices the British have made point up the nature of the options Americans will face if they wish to keep public health care budgets from driving taxes ever higher and private health care spending from crowding out increases in other forms of worker compensation and consumption. This book explains why serious consideration of health care rationing is inescapable. It also provides the information policymakers and concerned citizens need to think clearly about these difficult issues and engage in an informed debate.

Comments: (3)
Zicelik
This is a topic that should get more attention than it does. Increased rationing of health care is coming, no matter how much we want to wish it away. Aaron and Schwartz deserve credit adding to the, so far limited, discussion on the topic.

The book is largely a comparison of the provision of certain services in the United States and Britain. The British National Health Service was established after World War II and it generally holds down costs by establishing global budgets and requiring providers to operate within them. This method is likened to managed care by some. The British system has much lower use of services such as dialysis and fewer intensive care beds, even after adjusting for population differences. Given lower capacity in some areas, the British have to been much choosier about who receives care in these areas.

The British system of rationing was largely unregulated, in the sense there was not often a uniform criteria for choosing one patient over another. Rather providers were obliged to simply make do within their budgets and this helped create a "culture" of care provision that differs from the culture in the United States. Beginning in the 1980s, technological advancements and increased expenditures in some of the most heavily rationed areas, such as dialysis, greatly increased the capacity to provide care although rates of treatment are still far lower than in the U.S.

The authors suggest it might be wise for the U.S. to copy some aspects of the British system to help hold down costs. However, they acknowledge there are some significant differences, such as an American legal system that gives deference to demands for care.
Itiannta
I just heard one of the authors interviewed on NPR. Henry Aaron states in the opening that if health care costs continue to rise, they will move from 16% of the GDP in 2005 to over 33% by around 2030. He includes the caveat "that is a big if" yet the entire discussion assumes this is really inevitable.

Yet when one consider that technology is accelerating as pointed out by engineers Bill Joy, Ray Kurzweil, and others, medical technology will significantly transform health care over the next 25 years. Rather than costs increasing as a percentage of GDP, it is perfectly realistic to assume costs will instead decrease over the longer run.

We saw this trend with computers where Americans spent more and more per GDP on computers as computers and more software became available to more people. Yet at some point this trend began to reverse as computers became much cheaper even as they became far more powerful.

We will see health care costs *decrease* over time and the driving force - accelerating technology - should not be dismissed. The book makes sense over the shorter run and should be read with that timeframe in mind.
Ariurin
Excellent analysis of the health care mess. However, like almost all other such books, it stops short of a solution. For a thought provoking formulation of a solution that provides better health care at lower cost by clearly defining what the health care system is supposed to be accompishing, and squeezing the fat out of the system, see "You Bet Your Life: The Zero Sum Health Care Game", available at [email protected]