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eBook Big Sugar: Seasons in the Canefields of Florida download

by Alec Wilkinson

eBook Big Sugar: Seasons in the Canefields of Florida download ISBN: 0394573129
Author: Alec Wilkinson
Publisher: Akfred A. Knopf; 1st edition (September 2, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 263
ePub: 1218 kb
Fb2: 1220 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr lit lrf doc
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Wilkinson, Alec, 1952-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

Wilkinson, Alec, 1952-. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Big sugar : seasons in the cane fields of Florida, Alec Wilkinson.

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More importantly though it introduces the reader to the poor immigrant workers that slave away to produce the sugar that most give no thought

Wilkinson, Alec, 1952- author. Sugar workers Florida. Migrant agricultural laborers Florida.

Wilkinson, Alec, 1952- author.

BIG SUGAR Seasons in the Cane Fields of Florida. As Alec Wilkinson tells us in ''Big Sugar,'' the growers there at first depended on black men recruited throughout the South to harvest their crops

BIG SUGAR Seasons in the Cane Fields of Florida. As Alec Wilkinson tells us in ''Big Sugar,'' the growers there at first depended on black men recruited throughout the South to harvest their crops. But during World War II the economic circumstances of Southern blacks inconveniently improved. So the growers looked elsewhere for misfortune, and found an apparently inexhaustible supply in Jamaica and the surrounding islands. In consequence, ''West Indians have cut the sugar cane crop in south Florida for more than forty-five years.

The author of Midnights (1982) and Moonshine (1985) has failed here to bring into focus an overall theme for his work. Part of the problem undoubtedly stems from the fact that Wilkinson's sources in the field were reluctant to cooperate with him-the growers themselves because it was obvious that an expos‚ of their labor practices was in the works, the cane-cutters because they feared for their precarious jobs.

In his 1989 book, Big Sugar: Seasons in the Canefields of Florida, New Yorker staff writer Alec Wilkinson found that Florida's sugar industry still treated its predominantly Jamaican cutters as slaves, a problem that lingers today with migrant farmworkers. The Cape Florida lighthouse in Key Biscayne marks the site of a former underground "saltwater railroad. Photo by Phillip Pessar, Flickr.

Wilkinson's earlier books, Midnights ( LJ 7/82), a memoir about local police on Cape Cod, and Moonshine ( LJ. .

Wilkinson's earlier books, Midnights ( LJ 7/82), a memoir about local police on Cape Cod, and Moonshine ( LJ 8/85), a look at stills in North Carolina, have established him as a sensitive observer of out-of-the-way places and experiences. Here, he turns to Florida's vast but largely unknown sugar cane industry and the rural n, Belle Glade, Pahokee, Moore Haven-where the cane is grown and harvested. Central to the story is the brutish life of the men, mostly Jamaicans or other West Indians, who work the fields.

A compelling and timely study of the migrant workers who cut cane for large American sugar companies in Southern Florida provides an inside look at the difficult lives of the workers and at their exploitation by the powerful sugar industry
Comments: (5)
Vetitc
Very informative book, sheds light on the bad conditions that this big business inflicts on its workers.
Lonesome Orange Kid
Awesome Book! Quite enlightening!
Taun
Wanted a copy, no real rating here
Monin
Perfect
Marilbine
An extremely realistic portrait of the area that I was born in to and spent the first twenty years of my life. This book is so well researched and insightful that I learned many things about the industry that sustained my home town. More importantly though it introduces the reader to the poor immigrant workers that slave away to produce the sugar that most give no thought. If you would would like to be immersed in a world that you know nothing about and learn of a culture, while American, is as different as you may find this book will entertain and educate you.