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eBook The European Convention on Human Rights and the Conflict in Northern Ireland download

by Brice Dickson

eBook The European Convention on Human Rights and the Conflict in Northern Ireland download ISBN: 0199571384
Author: Brice Dickson
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 30, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 445
ePub: 1418 kb
Fb2: 1727 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf doc txt rtf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Brice Dickson studies the effectiveness of the Convention in protecting human rights in a society wracked by terrorism and deep political conflict, detailing the numerous applications lodged at Strasbourg relating to the conflict and considering how they were dealt with by the enforcement bodies.

The book illustrates the limits of the European Convention as a tool for protecting human rights in times of crisis.

Queen's University Belfast. The book illustrates the limits of the European Convention as a tool for protecting human rights in times of crisis. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. In Northern Ireland, human rights as a concept are far from politically neutral, and have not been fully embraced by formal politics and political structures in the province. The European Convention on Human Rights had minimal impact during the years of the Troubles (Dickson, 2010). One of the key human rights mechanisms envisioned in the GFA, the Bill of Rights, has been all but forgotten. Thinking globally, acting locally?

Professor Brice Dickson, a barrister from Northern Ireland, is Professor of. .

Professor Brice Dickson, a barrister from Northern Ireland, is Professor of International and Comparative Law at the School of Law, Queen's University Belfast. Dickson is also the author of numerous articles in legal journals and of chapters in books on law.

The book argues that, while eventually the European Court did use the applications from Northern Ireland to establish important human rights principles, their development was slow and arduous and some gaps in protection still remain.

Brice Dickson studies the effectiveness of the Convention in protecting human rights in a society wracked by terrorism and deep political conflict, detailing the numerous applications lodged at Strasbourg relating to the conflict and considering how they were dealt with by the enforcement bodies.

The European Convention .has been added to your Basket. He served full-time as the Chief Commissioner of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission from 1999 to 2005, a statutory body established as a result of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement of 1998

The European Convention . He served full-time as the Chief Commissioner of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission from 1999 to 2005, a statutory body established as a result of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement of 1998.

Brice Dickson studies the effectiveness of the Convention in protecting human rights in a society wracked by terrorism and deep political conflict, detailing the numerous applications lodged at Strasbourg relating to the conflict and considering how they were dealt with by th. The book illustrates the limitations inherent in the Convention system but also demonstrates how the European Commission and Court of Human Rights gradually developed a more interventionist approach to the applications emanating from Northern Ireland.

The background to the conflict and the rights discourse Early fumblings with the Convention Internment and restrictions on movement Powers of arrest Detention pending . Geographic Name: Northern Ireland History 1969-1994.

Uniform Title: Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (1950).

The European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) (formally the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms) is an international convention to protect human rights and political freedoms in Europe. Drafted in 1950 by the then. Drafted in 1950 by the then newly formed Council of Europe, the convention entered into force on 3 September 1953. All Council of Europe member states are party to the Convention and new members are expected to ratify the convention at the earliest opportunity.

European Conflict on Human Rights and the Conflict in Northern Ireland , provides the first comprehensive account of the role played by the European Convention on Human Rights during the conflict in Northern Ireland from 1968. Brice Dickson studies the effectiveness of the Convention in protecting human rights in a society wracked by terrorism and deep political conflict, detailing the numerous applications lodged at Strasbourg relating to the conflict and considering how they were dealt with by the enforcement bodies. The book illustrates the limitations inherent in the Convention system but also demonstrates how the European Commission and Court of Human Rights gradually developed a more interventionist approach to the applications emanating from Northern Ireland. In turn this allowed the Convention to become a more secure guarantor of basic rights and freedoms during times of extreme civil unrest and political turmoil elsewhere in Europe. The topics examined include the right to life, the right not to be ill-treated, the right to liberty, the right to a fair trial, the right to a private life, the right to freedom of belief, the right to freedom of expression, the right to freedom of assembly, and the right not to be discriminated against. The book argues that, while eventually the European Court did use the applications from Northern Ireland to establish important human rights principles, their development was slow and arduous and some gaps in protection still remain. The book illustrates the limits of the European Convention as a tool for protecting human rights in times of crisis.