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by Howard Goldstein

eBook The Home on Gorham Street and the Voices of Its Children download ISBN: 0817307818
Author: Howard Goldstein
Publisher: University Alabama Press (January 30, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1474 kb
Fb2: 1402 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit lrf txt rtf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Goldstein's ethnography demonstrates amply that children who spend years in an institution can go on to lead productive lives under certain conditions. Such conditions may never have been met in any other children's institution

Goldstein's ethnography demonstrates amply that children who spend years in an institution can go on to lead productive lives under certain conditions. Such conditions may never have been met in any other children's institution. That they did exist one time, however, is cause not only to rejoice but also to understand that recreating these conditions is difficult and possibly impossible.

The Home on Gorham Street and the Voices of Its Children.

Within this social history and ethnography, the voices of eldersÑonce wards of the home in the 1930s and 1940sÑtell us in sometimes poetic, often comic, usually ironic, and always poignant words what it was really like to grow up in an Òorphanage.

Published by: The University of Alabama Press. Within this social history and ethnography, the voices of eldersÑonce wards of the home in the 1930s and 1940sÑtell us in sometimes poetic, often comic, usually ironic, and always poignant words what it was really like to grow up in an Òorphanage. GoldsteinÕs ethnography demonstrates amply that children who spend years in an institution can go on to lead productive lives under certain conditions.

Within this social history and ethnography, the voices of elders once wards of the home in the 1930s and 1940s tell us in sometimes poetic, often comic, usually ironic, and always poignant words what it was really like to grow up in an orphanage.

Description: The Home on Gorham Street looks back to an earlier era of care for orphaned and dependent children of Eastern European Jewish immigrants. Within this social history and ethnography, the voices of elders once wards of the home in the 1930s and 1940s tell us in sometimes poetic, often comic, usually ironic, and always poignant words what it was really like to grow up in an orphanage.

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A Home of Another Kind: One Chicago Orphanage and the Tangle of Child Welfare. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Avoiding Linguistic Neglect of Deaf Children. Humphries et al. Pathways to the Overrepresentation of Aboriginal Children in Canada’s Child Welfare System.

Author of Social learning and change, Social work practice: a unitary approach, Creative Change, Experiential Learning, The home on Gorham Street and the voices of its .

Author of Social learning and change, Social work practice: a unitary approach, Creative Change, Experiential Learning, The home on Gorham Street and the voices of its children, Creative change, Promoting social communication.

Within this social history and ethnography, the voices of eldersÑonce wards of the home in the 1930s and 1940sÑtell us in sometimes poetic, often comic, usually . .Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Goldstein, Howard. Published: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 1996.

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The Home on Gorham Street looks back to an earlier era of care for orphaned and dependent children of Eastern European Jewish immigrants. Within this social history and ethnography, the voices of elders once wards of the home in the 1930s and 1940s tell us in sometimes poetic, often comic, usually ironic, and always poignant words what it was really like to grow up in an orphanage. Emerging from this penetrating adventure are principles for the future of effective group care in meeting the needs of the rapidly growing number of abused, forsaken, and orphaned children. Goldstein's ethnography demonstrates amply that children who spend years in an institution can go on to lead productive lives under certain conditions. Such conditions may never have been met in any other children's institution. That they did exist one time, however, is cause not only to rejoice but also to understand that recreating these conditions is difficult and possibly impossible.