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eBook History of Childhood: Untold Story of Child Abuse download

by Lloyd DeMause

eBook History of Childhood: Untold Story of Child Abuse download ISBN: 0947792686
Author: Lloyd DeMause
Publisher: Bellew Publishing Co Ltd (September 5, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 462
ePub: 1347 kb
Fb2: 1942 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr lrf txt mobi
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Lloyd deMause's team of investigators gives a vast portrait of childhood through the ages. The children so abysmally neglected in most works of history take center stage. And the tale they tell is damning, yet filled with hope.

Lloyd deMause's team of investigators gives a vast portrait of childhood through the ages. With often horrifying detail they show how the conditions for children have changed, usually at glacial speed. author of Correcting Jesus: 2000 Years of Changing the Story. 9 people found this helpful.

The History of Childhood book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The History of Childhood: The Untold Story of Child Abuse as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

About Lloyd DeMause: DeMause has made major contributions to the study of Psychohistory which . See if your friends have read any of Lloyd DeMause's books. The History of Childhood: The Untold Story of Child Abuse.

About Lloyd DeMause: DeMause has made major contributions to the study of Psychohistory which is the study of the psychological motivations of historical. Lloyd DeMause’s Followers (25). More video. loyd DeMause. in Detroit, Michigan, The United States.

Lloyd deMause (pronounced de-Moss; born September 19, 1931) is an American social . DeMause, Lloyd (1988): On Writing Childhood History. In: The Journal of Psychohistory, 16 (2), p. 35-71.

Lloyd deMause (pronounced de-Moss; born September 19, 1931) is an American social thinker known for his work in the field of psychohistory. He did graduate work in political science at Columbia University and later trained as a lay psychoanalyst, which is defined as a psychoanalyst who does not have a medical degree. He is the founder of The Journal of Psychohistory.

Examples from the history of childhood regularly reveal children are expected to absorb the bad feelings of. .The evolution of childhood from incest to love and from abuse to empathy has been a slow, uneven path, but one whose progressive direction is, I think, unmistakable.

Examples from the history of childhood regularly reveal children are expected to absorb the bad feelings of their caretakers. As one peasant community in rural Greece puts it, you must have children around to put your bad feelings into, especially when the Bad Hour comes around.

Books by Lloyd deMause Yet despite these four books, the central questions of comparative childhood history remain to be asked, much less answered

Books by Lloyd deMause. Chapter 1: The Shooting of Ronald Reagan. The history of childhood is a nightmare from which we have only recently begun to awaken. The further back in history one goes, the lower the level of child care, and the more likely children are to be killed, abandoned, beaten, terrorized, and sexually abused. Yet despite these four books, the central questions of comparative childhood history remain to be asked, much less answered. In the next two sections of this chapter, I will cover some of the psychological principles that apply to adult-child relations in the past.

- John Bradshaw Neither history nor psychiatry can ever be the same again. A turning point in the integration of the social sciences. Lloyd deMause is probably the first scholar who has made a thorough study of the history of childhood without glossing over the facts. - Alice Miller show more.

I came upon this article, that offers a quite different view on the history of childhood and related trauma. Автор установил для этого видео ограничение по возрасту.

The history of childhood. Ross - The child as beginning and end : fifteenth and sixteenth century English childhood, . Tucker - Nature versus nurture : patterns and trends in seventeenth-century French child-rearing, Elizabeth Wirth Marvick - Child-rearing in seventeenth-century England and America, Joseph E. Illick - A period of ambivalence : eighteenth-century American childhood, John F. Walzer -. "That enemy is the baby" : childhood in imperial Russia, Patrick P. Dunn - Home as a nest : middle class childhood in nineteenth-century Europe, Priscilla Robertson. from the Foreword: Possibly the heartless treatment of children, from the practice of infanticide and abandonment through to the neglect, the rigors of swaddling, the purposeful starving, the beatings, the solitary confinement, and so on, was and is only one aspect of the basic aggressiveness and cruelty of human nature, of the inbred disregard of the rights and feelings of others.

The History of Childhood The Untold Story of Child Abuse
Comments: (6)
Tisicai
This book opened my eyes and ignited my curiosity. Lloyd deMause is a unique mind, whose extrapolations and views are sometimes quite far fetched, but his brilliance and courage in exposing historical records that make us see the whole world in a different light is remarkable.
Haralem
This is a tough one to read, especially since it is the work of multiple researchers and authors. The writing style changes from chapter to chapter, which can break the flow of the book.

If you take your time, a vivid picture of what childhood was like in the past (at least in Western culture) will slowly unravel. The pattern of improvement becomes evident, always marked by an abrupt change in childrearing practices against the norm of the day. It was these maverick parents that we should thank for the gradual improvement in childhood throughout history.

I can only hope the trend continues for the better. The state of childhood is still in a fairly pathetic state, even in the twenty-first century.

To read more of Lloyd deMause's work, check out his website (psychohistory.com). There is much free literature that is well worth reading. I do not accept all of his conclusions (especially the far-fetched ones), but his views bring a breath of fresh air into the scene of childhood, psychology, and history.
Impala Frozen
The publication of The History of Childhood in 1974 marks the turning point in the field that deMause created. Putting aside the idealizations of previous historians, the book examines for the first time the history of Western childhood. In the new deMausean paradigm the force of the change is neither technology nor the economy, but the interactions between parents and children.

The initial paragraphs became so famous in psychohistory that they have being quoted extensively:

Quote:

The history of childhood is a nightmare from which we have only recently begun to awaken. The further back in history one goes, the lower the level of child care, and the more likely children are to be killed, abandoned, beaten, terrorized, and sexually abused. It is our task here to see how much of this childhood history can be recaptured from the evidence that remains to us.

That this pattern has not previously been noticed by historians is because serious history has long been considered a record of public not private events. Historians have concentrated so much on the noisy sand-box of history, with its fantastic castles and magnificent battles, that they have generally ignored what is going on in the homes around the playground. And where historians usually look to the sandbox battles of yesterday for the causes of those of today, we instead ask how each generation of parents and children creates those issues which are later acted out in the arena of public life.

/end quote

DeMause has no illusions. Like Thomas Kuhn, he knows perfectly well that paradigm revolutions are achieved gradually while the defenders of the old paradigm die and are replaced by new individuals. "If childhood history and psychohistory mean anything,", writes deMause, "they mean reversing most of the causal arrows used by historians to date." In other words, the way of seeing the world in the humanities and in social sciences is upside down, and psychohistory places our feet back on the ground. The relations between parents and children have determined the social, political and economic aspects in all civilizations of the world. In contrast to the findings of Darwin about the organism and its environment, in Homo sapiens the external world does not mold future developments so definitively as the intergenerational emergency of empathy does.

In a nutshell, the main finding of psychohistory is that academic history fails to recognize the profound role that the love of the parents for their children plays in the future developments of mankind.
Akinonris
This revolutionary book impacted not only childhood history but history in general, as well as psychology and the hybrid field of psychohistory. The scholarly contributions remain essential reading for those who wish to look candidly at the past and the introduction by deMause is simply epochal. His view that adult and social violence have their origins in childhood has been vindicated by the most important studies of the subject, including James Gilligan's "Violence," Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Rhodes's "Why They Kill," and Anna Motz's groundbreaking study of female violence "The Psychology of Female Violence," the latter two having drawn on the works of deMause. Accordingly, this book is important not only for understanding our past, but as an indicator of where much fruitful scholarship is going to be done in the future. This work has rightly been praised by such noted historians as William Langer, Past President of the American Historical Association, and Rudolph Binion, as well as many luminaries from the field of psychology including psychiatrist Morton Schatzman, and eminent therapists like Reuben Fine and Alice Miller, who has drawn extensively on deMause's work. I concur with the New York Review of Books that this work is "Brilliant...bold...challenging." I would also add "indispensable." I cannot recommend this work too highly.