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eBook Why Doesn't Microfinance Work?: The Destructive Rise of Local Neoliberalism download

by Milford Bateman

eBook Why Doesn't Microfinance Work?: The Destructive Rise of Local Neoliberalism download ISBN: 1848133324
Author: Milford Bateman
Publisher: Zed Books; 1 edition (June 15, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1397 kb
Fb2: 1693 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt azw doc rtf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

In this provocative and controversial analysis, Milford Bateman reveals that microfinance doesn't actually work.

Since its emergence in the 1970s, microfinance has risen to become one of the most high-profile policies to address poverty and under-development in developing and transition countries. Its most famous pioneer, Muhammad Yunus, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006. In this provocative and controversial analysis, Milford Bateman reveals that microfinance doesn't actually work.

Why Doesn't Microfinance Work? book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Why Doesn't Microfinance Work?: The Destructive Rise of Local Neoliberalism.

Bateman is the first, however, to examine microfinance critically and coherently as a whole, and to take a sceptical long term view of its social and economic effects. Few readers will agree with everything he writes, but anyone who has any connection with microfinance should read this book. It should make us all think more clearly about what we are doing. - Malcolm Harper, Cranfield School of Management.

The Destructive Rise of Local Neoliberalism. Why Doesn’t Microfinance Work? The destructive rise of local neoliberalism was first published in 2010 by Zed Books Ltd, 7 Cynthia Street, London N1 7jf, UK and Room 400, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010, USA. ww. edbooks. Set in Monotype Sabon and Gill Sans Heavy by Ewan Smith, London. Index: e. meryreeuniversity.

In this provocative and controversial analysis, Milford Bateman reveals that microfinance doesn’t actually work. Milford Bateman is a freelance consultant specialising in local economic development policy, particularly in relation to the Western Balkans

In this provocative and controversial analysis, Milford Bateman reveals that microfinance doesn’t actually work. In fact, the case for it has been largely built on hype, on egregious half-truths and – latterly – on the Wall Street-style greed of those promoting and working in microfinance. Milford Bateman is a freelance consultant specialising in local economic development policy, particularly in relation to the Western Balkans. He has worked as a consultant for most of the major international development agencies and for several of the major international NGOs. He is also currently a Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Juraj Dobrila at Pula, Croatia.

In this provocative and controversial analysis, Milford Bateman reveals that microfinance doesn't actually work. In fact, the case for it has been largely built on hype, on egregious half-truths and latterly on the Wall Street-style greed of those promoting and working in microfinance.

Enterprise development & microfinance, 2010. Download with Google. Reseña del libro:" Why doesn't microfinance work? The destructive rise of local neo-liberalism by Milford Bateman.

Milford Bateman's new book, Why Doesn't Microfinance Work? The Destructive Rise of Local Neoliberalism .

Milford Bateman's new book, Why Doesn't Microfinance Work? The Destructive Rise of Local Neoliberalism, annoys me in much the way that Dambisa Moyo's did last year. I see myself as open-minded, but I guess I am allergic to (as I perceive it) sloppy thinking. The book makes dramatic conspiracy claims, yet is loose in its reasoning; careless in its use of evidence; and heavy in its use of passive voice and weighty abstractions such as "neoliberalism" that obscure for the reader (and perhaps the writer) who is accused of doing what. I found it hard to get through.

being able to identify with our work and its results. will to a great degree be determined by our vision and – I fear – no less decisively by.

Since its emergence in the 1970s, microfinance has risen to become one of the most high-profile policies to address poverty and under-development in developing and transition countries. It is beloved of rock stars, royalty, movie stars, high-profile politicians and "trouble-shooting" economists. Its most famous pioneer, Muhammad Yunus, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006.

In this provocative and controversial analysis, Milford Bateman reveals that microfinance doesn't actually work. That, in fact, the case for it has largely been built on a desire to advance a particular free market ideology, on hype and egregious half-truths, and -- latterly -- on the Wall Street-style greed, deception and individual self-interest of those promoting and working in microfinance. Using a multitude of case studies from across the globe -- from India to Cambodia, Bolivia to Uganda, Serbia to Mexico amongst many others -- he exposes why many of its most fundamental building blocks are largely myths. In doing so, he demonstrates that microfinance actually constitutes a major barrier to sustainable economic and social development, and thus also to sustainable poverty reduction.

As developing and transition countries attempt to repair the devastation wrought by the global financial crisis, Bateman argues forcefully that the role of microfinance in development policy needs to be urgently and fundamentally reconsidered.

Comments: (4)
Sironynyr
It's too socialistic and repetative, although his ideas are currently fanishable
Simple fellow
It is refreshing to see that there are still writers and publishing companies out there that are willing to challenge fashionable trends. Microfinance as a model for economic development has become very fashionable, particularly among Western developed nations. This is, in part, because it was held to be a kind of "pull yourself up by your bootstraps" model of economic development in poor countries. This means reducing government subsidies and letting the market take care of things--a key economic principle in free-market, neoliberal ideology. Milford Bateman does an excellent job of demonstrating how the core mission of microfinance institutions (MFIs) shifted from poverty reduction to profit maximization as part of the neoliberal movement in the banking industry starting in the 1990s. As we have seen from the Mexican peso crisis, the East Asian crisis, and the Russian Ruble crisis in the late 1990s and the banking crisis of 2008, the results of neoliberal financial market deregulation have been disastrous. Microfinance is no exception. Bateman's book is accessible, informative and an crucial resource for anyone interested in microfinance or economic development. Highly recommended.
Gann
This book has a weak empirical basis for its attack on microfinance. A more recent text by Lamia Karim does a much better job of demonstrating the reasons microfinance, particularly in Bangladesh, has not lived up to expectations.
Umsida
This is less a thoughtful analysis of the microfinance industry and more an all out assault on it. While many of the view expressed by Bateman are based on valid insight, he pushes the argument past what can be reasonably concluded from the evidence presented. Bateman nitpicks his cases to illustrate his points and thus does not adequately review a representative sample of microfinance outcomes. The deepest fallacy of the book is the assumption of a zero-sum game in aid funding. In essence, he argues that funds directed toward microfinance draw money away from more productive development activities. The evidence supporting this claim is dubious. It should not be assumed that taking money away from microfinance projects would make it available for other types of development work. That said, the book is worth reading if you work in the field or have only heard the positive spin on the subject in the past.