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eBook After the Taliban: Nation-Building in Afghanistan download

by James F. Dobbins

eBook After the Taliban: Nation-Building in Afghanistan download ISBN: 1597970832
Author: James F. Dobbins
Publisher: Potomac Books (July 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 179
ePub: 1745 kb
Fb2: 1644 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi lit docx azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

During his long diplomatic career, Dobbins became an expert in helping to put together states shattered by civil war or invasion.

During his long diplomatic career, Dobbins became an expert in helping to put together states shattered by civil war or invasion. Having served in this capacity in Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia, and Kosovo, he was a natural pick for this role in Afghanistan as the United States turned to the task of overthrowing the Taliban and chasing al Qaeda after 9/11.

After the Taliban: Nation Building in Afghanistan" is only 179 pages, but it is the most informative foreign relations book that I have ever read. The book was a great follow-up read to "Three Cups of Tea" which ended with the explosion of madrahsas in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

In After the Taliban, Dobbins probes the relationship between the Afghan and Iraqi ventures. He demonstrates how each damaged the other, with deceptively easy success in Afghanistan breeding overconfidence and then the latter draining essential resources away from the initial effort. In October 2001, the Bush administration sent Amb. James F. Dobbins, who had overseen nation-building efforts in Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia, and Kosovo, to war-torn Afghanistan to help the Afghans assemble a successor government to the Taliban.

The Talibans originated in the Pashtun heartland of Kandahar. Let us now examine the Western effort in Afghanistan in light of James Dobbins’ criteria. I had the pleasure of visiting Afghanistan for a few days in November and December 2004, not long after the Presidential election on 9 October, when, in spite of frequent terrorist attacks by the Taliban, the Afghans in large numbers streamed to the polls. Then, the American Ambassador announced that the Taliban was finished. Unfortunately, Afghanistan has been one of the most under-resourced of all attempts of peacebuilding since the end of the Second World War.

James Francis Dobbins, Jr. (born May 31, 1942) is an American diplomat who served as United States Ambassador to the European Union (1991–1993), as Assistant Secretary of. .After the Taliban: Nation-Building in Afghanistan. ISBN 978-1-59797-083-9. (born May 31, 1942) is an American diplomat who served as United States Ambassador to the European Union (1991–1993), as Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs (2001), and as Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan (May 2013 – July 2014). He is a member of the American Academy of Diplomacy. He was envoy to Kosovo, Bosnia, Haiti, and Somalia. James Dobbins, Seth G. Jones, Benjamin Runkle (2009). Occupying Iraq: A History of the Coalition Provisional Authority.

After the Taliban: Nation-Building in Afghanistan. During his long diplomatic career, Dobbins became an expert in helping to put together states shattered by civil war or invasion.

James F. Dobbins, who had overseen nation-building efforts in Somalia. In After the Taliban, Dobbins probes the relationship between the Afghan and Iraqi ventures.

James Dobbins, author of After the Taliban: Nation Building in Afghanistan ). Seth G. Jones’s book provides a vivid sense of just how paltry and misguided the American effort has been. In the Graveyard of Empireswill help to show what might still be done to build something enduring in Afghanistan and finally allow the . Dexter Filkins – The New Republic ). Dobbins, After the Taliban: Nation-Building in Afghanistan (Dulles: Potomac Books, 2008), 44–45, 88, 102–3, 129–31;Google Scholar. Michael Evans and Philip Webster, Britain and . Row over Troops, The Times (London), November 20, 2001. 5. Michael Evans and Martin Fletcher, Britain Picks Euro-Army for Peacekeeping Mission, The Times (London), January 9, 2002Google Scholar.

After the Taliban: Nation-building in Afghanistan Dullers: Potomac Books. Declaration on the Situation in Afghanistan by. the Foreign Ministers and other senior representatives of the "Six plus Two". Doyle, M. W. (1983a). Kant, liberal legacies, and foreign affairs, part 2. Philosophy &.

In October 2001, the Bush administration sent Amb. James F. Dobbins, who had overseen nation-building efforts in Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia, and Kosovo, to war-torn Afghanistan to help the Afghans assemble a successor government to the Taliban. From warlords to exiled royalty, from turbaned tribal chieftains to elegant émigré intellectuals, Ambassador Dobbins introduces a range of colorful Afghan figures competing for dominance in the new Afghanistan. His firsthand account of the post–9/11 American diplomacy also reveals how collaboration within Bush’s war cabinet began to break down almost as soon as major combat in Afghanistan ceased. His insider’s memoir recounts how the administration reluctantly adjusted to its new role as nation-builder, refused to allow American soldiers to conduct peacekeeping operations, opposed dispatching international troops, and shortchanged Afghan reconstruction as its attention shifted to Iraq. In After the Taliban, Dobbins probes the relationship between the Afghan and Iraqi ventures. He demonstrates how each damaged the other, with deceptively easy success in Afghanistan breeding overconfidence and then the latter draining essential resources away from the initial effort. Written by America’s most experienced diplomatic troubleshooter, this important new book is for readers looking for insights into how government really works, how diplomacy is actually conducted, and most important why the United States has failed to stabilize either Afghanistan or Iraq.
Comments: (4)
Yozshubei
"After the Taliban: Nation Building in Afghanistan" is only 179 pages, but it is the most informative foreign relations book that I have ever read. Although it isn't the easiest book to read (I plan to read it again to get it set in my mind), it shows clearly that TRUE diplomatic negotiations with the world requires a knowledgeable, THINKING, intelligent commander-in-chief who can select the RIGHT people to perform such important duties -- and will seek information and LISTEN to those assigned to deal with foreign countries. A person who thinks military solutions are the answer to delicate foreign relations will only create more problems for our nation in the 21st Century. The book was a great follow-up read to "Three Cups of Tea" which ended with the explosion of madrahsas in Pakistan and Afghanistan. (see my review) The last sentence of "After the Taliban" sums it up well: "Peace will not come to Afghanistan, or Iraq for that matter, until American military prowess is once again matched to an inclusive diplomatic strategy that has some prospect of gaining broad regional support." (p. 168)HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
Gholbirius
It was a gift to my son. He hated it . Md
Danial
Very readable account by acknowledged expert on how we tip toed into the Afghan thicket. A welcome diplomatic contribution to the literature on Afghanistan.
Agamaginn
A good book about nation building in Afghanistan