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eBook Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail download

by Caitlin Kelly

eBook Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail download ISBN: 1591845432
Author: Caitlin Kelly
Publisher: Portfolio; Reprint edition (July 31, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1746 kb
Fb2: 1709 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf lrf docx azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Malled by Caitlin Kelly challenges our assumptions about the world of retail, documenting one woman's struggle to find . I needed steady cash.

Malled by Caitlin Kelly challenges our assumptions about the world of retail, documenting one woman's struggle to find meaningful work in a broken system. Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail, my new, second book, tells the story of the next two years of my life, working part-time selling merchandise to some of the country’s wealthiest shoppers. I survived three holiday seasons, two Black Fridays and Christmas Eve; you can read the gory details in Chapter Three: Deck The Halls, Not The Customers. Described by biographer Meryl Gordon, as rollicking and riveting, Malled takes you behind the cash wrap and the stockroom doors.

Book Summary: The Starbucks Experience - Продолжительность: 2:02 Business Book Summaries Recommended for you. 2:02. DIY KITCHEN MAKEOVER & ORGANIZATION // Before + After Transformation - Продолжительность: 23:07 XO, MaCenna Recommended for you.

I heard part of author Caitlin Kelly’s NPR interview last week and was intrigued by the idea of the book: displaced professional take a retail job to help make ends meet

I heard part of author Caitlin Kelly’s NPR interview last week and was intrigued by the idea of the book: displaced professional take a retail job to help make ends meet. As the economy continues to try and recover, the media has covered individuals who have been forced to select other professions and lower-paying jobs after losing their jobs.

Malled: My Unintentional. has been added to your Cart. After losing her job as a journalist in 2006, Kelly, middle-agedand mid-career, went to work as a part-time salesassociate in a suburban mall. - The New York Times, paperback row.

Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail by Caitlin Kelly. BOUNCY VIDEO: Wonderbra's Fitting Room Has Trampoline Inside.

Caitlin Kelly, author of "Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail" CB.

Caitlin Kelly, author of "Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail" CBS. "CBS Early Show" News Anchor Jeff Glor interviews Caitlin Kelly about her new book "Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail. CK: I hope to write my next book about work and how we can thrive in a job even without a big paycheck, which millions of us are now having to do in this recession.

My two books of nationally reported non -fiction are Blown Away: American Women and Guns, (Pocket Books), called groundbreaking and invaluable, and Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail (Portfolio), a candid look at low-wage work in the United States.

Laai dit af om vanlyn te lees, te merk, te boekmerk of aantekeninge te maak terwyl jy Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail . After losing her job as a journalist and the security of a good salary, Caitlin Kelly was hard up for cash.

Laai dit af om vanlyn te lees, te merk, te boekmerk of aantekeninge te maak terwyl jy Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail lees. When she saw that The North Face-an upscale outdoor clothing company-was hiring at her local mall, she went for an interview almost on a whim. Suddenly she found herself, middle-aged and mid-career, thrown headfirst into the bizarre alternate reality of the American mall: a world of low-wage workers selling overpriced goods to well-to-do customers.

Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail. In the tradition of Nickel and Dimed, Malled challenges our assumptions about the world of retail, documenting one woman's struggle to find meaningful work in a broken system

Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail. One woman's midcareer misadventures in the absurd world of American retail. In the tradition of Nickel and Dimed, Malled challenges our assumptions about the world of retail, documenting one woman's struggle to find meaningful work in a broken system. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Penguin GroupReleased: Apr 14, 2011ISBN: 9781101476376Format: book.

For all her complaining, Kelly worked only one five-hour shift a week, plus three Christmas rushes, over 27 months on the job. (That’s all?) Less amusing is her repetitive boasting, even if it’s intended to illustrate a larger point

One woman's midcareer misadventures in the absurd world of American retail. After losing her job as a journalist and the security of a good salary, Caitlin Kelly was hard up for cash. When she saw that The North Face-an upscale outdoor clothing company-was hiring at her local mall, she went for an interview almost on a whim. Suddenly she found herself, middle-aged and mid-career, thrown headfirst into the bizarre alternate reality of the American mall: a world of low-wage workers selling overpriced goods to well-to-do customers. At first, Kelly found her part-time job fun and reaffirming, a way to maintain her sanity and sense of self-worth. But she describes how the unexpected physical pressures, the unreasonable dictates of a remote corporate bureaucracy, and the dead-end career path eventually took their toll. As she struggled through more than two years at the mall, despite surgeries, customer abuse, and corporate inanity, Kelly gained a deeper understanding of the plight of the retail worker. In the tradition of Nickel and Dimed, Malled challenges our assumptions about the world of retail, documenting one woman's struggle to find meaningful work in a broken system.
Comments: (7)
Raniconne
This book was terrible. I had to order it for my Justice Studies class and in that aspect it worked. Part of our coursework was recognizing Caitlin Kelly's own prejudices that she herself does not even recognize. However I cannot stand the woman. Never even meeting her, I really dislike her. She talks about discrimination in the book and doesn't even realize when she herself is being discriminatory. She talks about people who put her down and then turns around and makes comments putting down her coworkers. She talks about sexism and racism but then when describing the people she hates uses phrasing like, "...big black man...," and "that skinny blonde bitch." She claims to know what it's like working in retail yet she works minimal hours. She complained about the most petty things. She puts others down and hoists herself up on a pedestal, constantly bragging about her past life experiences. From this whole book, all I gained was that Caitlin Kelly is a prejudiced, entitled, angry woman who resents being fired and has to make up for it by putting others down, talking herself up, then writing a book to prove her journalistic "skills." Terrible woman. Terrible book.
Fato
I was excited for this book, having found myself in an "unintentional career in retail", but the author's experiences could not be farther from my truth!

The book is insightful only if you've never worked a day in retail in your life. As written, it is a perfect accompaniment to the saavy shopper who wants to feel "connected" to the plight of the lowly retail worker.

If you're a SAHM who is a demanding customer, you'll love this insider view. Otherwise, don't waste your time.
Rolorel
An overall depressing read. No funny stories that come about after working in retail, which are pure entertainment that could've spiced up this chore of a book. A white over-privileged woman finds herself among those she deems beneath her, and spends far too much time pointing out their differences. If the author took the time to focus on praising those who actually make a career of retail, instead of slamming everyone involved, her recognition that it is indeed a difficult job would mean much more.
xander
This book held no big surprises to anyone who has worked in any aspect of sales or customer service (The two seem to be almost used interchangeably in this book). Corporate greed, lack of compassion, unrealistic expectations, and trickle down principles, resulting in a lack of company loyalty are illustrated brilliantly by Ms. Kelly. All in the framework of an easy to read novel. This story should be used in Business Schools as part of the curriculum, with the warning: “Don’t let this happen to you”. Sad but true.
Alien
I was looking forward to reading this book written by a woman who had to learn to live off of a retail salary due to the down-turn of the economy. I expected quirky stories about customers and coworkers (there were), rude bosses (there were), and crappy working conditions and hours (there were.) But wait...most of this stuff did not actually happen to the author! Sure it happened to her coworkers who actually did have to work full time, who actually needed the job. For the last year she worked there, Kelly mostly had the same schedule every week and she worked one day per week. How does this give someone insight into working retail? It doesn't, but it made her what sounded like a complainer and a whiner. She had to deal with it one day per week on most weeks! She can dramatize all she wants, but working on a very part-time basis for a retail company does not make you a retail worker.
Xmatarryto
The book is interesting but needs a really good editor. Repeating the same information at least five times is annoying. Most readers will not care about why the author left a promising career in journalism for work as a sales clerk. I was most interested in how shelves and racks in clothing stores are stocked to entice the shopper and how the clerks are trained or not trained as the case may be. The moral of the story is don't quit your really good job to become a sales clerk.
Umrdana
...but unfortunately this book deserves much of the criticism it is receiving. In what I can only hope was unintentional on Ms. Kelly's part, she comes across as smug, elitist and not at all "one of the team." The repetitiveness of the material - yes, we know she wrote for the Times, that she lived in an affluent neighborhood while her co-workers lived in the Bronx, and most of all that the merchandise was stacked too high and there was dust above it. I'm sitting in an airport lounge with time to kill and can't wait to finish this book so I can start another one.

As many have pointed out, this really was a magazine piece stretched into a book. So much so that I really have to wonder which bits and pieces from her "memory" were embellished to fill the pages.

Sadly the book started out with promise but never got out of first gear...
I thought the author was very brave to A) write about losing her job and B) not be ashamed to take a job in retail. We've all been in retail stores - this was an interesting behind the scenes look