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eBook Aging Asia: The Economic and Social Implications of Rapid Demographic Change in China, Japan, and South Korea download

by Karen Eggleston,Shripad Tuljapurkar

eBook Aging Asia: The Economic and Social Implications of Rapid Demographic Change in China, Japan, and South Korea download ISBN: 1931368201
Author: Karen Eggleston,Shripad Tuljapurkar
Publisher: Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (January 24, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 360
ePub: 1884 kb
Fb2: 1589 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi lit azw txt
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Nowhere are these effects of aging and demographic change more acute-nor their long-term effects more .

Nowhere are these effects of aging and demographic change more acute-nor their long-term effects more potentially significant-than in the Asia-Pacific region.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Liu, Chengfang, Zhang, Linxiu, Luo, Renfu, Wang, Xiaobing, Rozelle, Scott, Sharbono, Brian, Adams, Jennifer, et al. 2011. Early Commitment on Financial Aid and College Decision Making of Poor Students: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Rural China.

Ogawa, Naohiro, Amonthep Chawla and Rikiya Matsukura 2010 " Changing Intergenerational Transfers in Aging Japan. Baltimore, MD: The Brookings Institution.

In 2010, aggregate real gross domestic product (GDP) in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP) of China, Japan, South Korea (henceforth Korea), Hong Kong, China, and Taiwan surpassed that of both North America and the European Union. 1 According to Maddison’s frequently cited estimate, these economies together also constituted the largest economic zone in 1820, producing more than one-third

that establishes the book’s tone that aging isn’t necessarily negative. With these serving up to 4 percent of known cases in China, demand exceeds capacity.

that establishes the book’s tone that aging isn’t necessarily negative. An aging society doesn’t necessarily lead to devastating economic consequences as long as societies and individuals continue to learn, adapt and innovate. Singapore has a knack for anticipating change and adapting swiftly, gearing up for its silver tsunami, writes Meng Kin-Lim, public health director of the Association of Pacific Rim Universities World Institute, in the concluding essay.

by Shripad Tuljapurkar. In the past fifty years, two factors have led to global population aging: a decline in fertility to levels close toor even belowreplacement and a decline in mortality that has increased world average life expectancy by nearly 67 percent.

King, E. S. Klasen, and M. Porter. Women and Development.

Though South Korea sees China as instrumental in reviving negotiations, it has so far sidestepped questions on whether it supports the new proposal by Beijing and Moscow. With the (2020 Tokyo) Olympics coming up, North Korea going wild would pose a problem for Japan," said Narushige Michishita, professor at Japan's National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies

The data was gathered from the residential change forms in Ikuno's ward office

The data was gathered from the residential change forms in Ikuno's ward office. The data collected is: gender, type of migration (individual or family), age, and destination or origin of the flows.

In the past fifty years, two factors have led to global population aging: a decline in fertility to levels close to—or even below—replacement and a decline in mortality that has increased world average life expectancy by nearly 67 percent. As the population skews toward fewer young people and more elderly who live longer postretirement lives, demographic changes—labor force participation, savings, economic growth, living arrangements, marriage markets, and social policy—are transforming society in fundamental, irreversible ways. Nowhere are these effects of aging and demographic change more acute—nor their long-term effects more potentially significant—than in the Asia-Pacific region. How will these developments impact the economies and social protection systems of Japan, South Korea, China, and, by extension, the United States?

To assess this question, Aging Asia showcases cutting-edge, policy-relevant research. The first section focuses on demographic trends and their economic implications; the second section approaches select topics from a global comparative perspective, including social insurance financing, medical costs, and long-term care.