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eBook Food Is Different: Why the WTO Should Get out of Agriculture (Global Issues) download

by Peter M. Rosset

eBook Food Is Different: Why the WTO Should Get out of Agriculture (Global Issues) download ISBN: 1842777548
Author: Peter M. Rosset
Publisher: Zed Books (October 17, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 194
ePub: 1608 kb
Fb2: 1829 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf doc lit lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Peter Rosset argues that what is at stake is the very future of our global . The section of the book concerning the & of food, which leads to the book's title, is the least convincing

Peter Rosset argues that what is at stake is the very future of our global food system, of each country's unique agricultural and farming systems. Rosset, who lives in Chiapas, Mexico, has an interesting section on the North American Free Trade Area (NAFTA). Because of the cheap US maize pouring into Mexico as a result of NAFTA, Mexican peasant farmers cannot sell their produce. The section of the book concerning the & of food, which leads to the book's title, is the least convincing. Food is not just any merchandise or commodity, say Rosset; it "means rural livelihoods, traditions and cultures and it means preserving, or destroying, rural landscapes".

Food is Different - Peter M. Rosset. Designed and typeset in Monotype Bembo by Long House, Cumbria, UK. Cover designed by Andrew Corbett.

Food is Different book. Food Is Different: Why the WTO Should Get out of Agriculture (Global Issues). 1842777556 (ISBN13: 9781842777558).

Peter Rosset argues that what is at stake is the very future of our global food system, of each country's unique agricultural and farming systems, and th. .Food Is Different : Why We Must Get the WTO Out of Agriculture. Part of the Global Issues Series Series).

Critically, Rosset argues that if food is different, it should not be treated as any other merchandise. WTO meetings in 1999 and 2003. The second chapter of the book looks critically key issues such.

Food is Different: Why We Must Get the WTO Out of Agriculture. Halifax, Nova Scottia: Fernwood Publishing, Bangalore: Books for Change, Kuala. Critically, Rosset argues that if food is different, it should not be treated as any other merchandise. in our global economy. He further stresses that what we are really talking about is development. issues with an impact on food and agriculture.

Peter M. Rosset’s Food is Different, comprising five chapters along with introduction (Trade versus Development?) and conclusion (Another Food System is Possible), is an active participant in the debate on the influence of WTO-imposed liberalization, privatization and globalization o. Rosset’s Food is Different, comprising five chapters along with introduction (Trade versus Development?) and conclusion (Another Food System is Possible), is an active participant in the debate on the influence of WTO-imposed liberalization, privatization and globalization on agriculture.

Why does our global food system gives us expensive, unhealthy and .

Why does our global food system gives us expensive, unhealthy and bad-tasting food, where we pay more for packaging and long-distance shipping than we do for the food itself? . Peter Rosset explains how the runaway free trade policies and neoliberal economics of the WTO, American government and European Union kill farmers, and give us a food system that nobody outside of a small corporate elite wants. This essential guide sets out an alternative vision for agricultural policy, taking it completely out of the WTO's ambit. Food is not just another commodity, to be bought and sold like a microchip, but something which goes to the heart of human livelihood, culture and society.

Nearly impossible to get gigs and or retain a booking agent, Stephan started the .

Peter Rosset is a food rights activist and agro-ecologist. This is a timely publication that gives voice and expression to those who have none. Paul Nicholson, European Farmers Coordination (CPE) and La Via Campesina.

Peter Rosset argues that what is at stake is the very future of our global food system, of each country's unique agricultural and farming systems, and the livelihoods of rural people in both the rich industrial countries and the South. He unravels the complex ways in which agriculture in the North is supported, subsidized etc. and argues for the future of agriculture to be taken completely out of the WTO's ambit since food is not just another commodity, but something which goes to the heart of human livelihood, local cultures and national security.
Comments: (2)
Yadon
This is the definitive book on the WTO's impact on farmers. Peter Rosset is the leading authority on small farmers and trade policy.
Akinohn
"I am 56 years old, a farmer from South Korea. I have mostly failed, as many other farm leaders elsewhere have failed. We cannot seem to do anything to stop the waves that have destroyed our communities, where we have been settled for hundreds of years. I have tried to find the real reason and the real force behind those waves. And I have reached the conclusion, here in front of the WTO.

Our fears became reality in the marketplace. We soon realised that, despite our best efforts, we could never match the prices of cheap imports. We became aware that our farm size, 1.3 hectares on average, is a mere one-hundredth of the farms in the large exporting countries. Since massive importing began, we small farmers have never been paid as much as our production costs. Sometimes prices would drop fourfold, all of a sudden.

The farmers who gave up early went to urban slums. Others who tried to escape from the vicious cycle have met with bankruptcy due to accumulated debts. For me, I couldn't do anything but look around at the vacant houses in the village, old and decaying. Once I went to a house where a farmer took his life by drinking a toxic chemical because of his uncontrollable debts. I could do nothing but listen to the howling of his wife."

This is an edited version of the statement distributed by Lee Kyung Hae shortly before he took his own life on 16 September 2003 in Cancún, Mexico, in the mass protests against the World Trade Organisation (WTO) talks. In the early 1990s, after the Korean government had dismantled trade barriers and the market had been flooded with very cheap imported food, millions of farmers lost their farms. For many, the shame brought by losing their ancestral land was unbearable. Peter M. Rosset dedicates this book* to Lee Kyung Hae.

Rosset, a food rights activist and rural development specialist, has written a clear and extremely accessible account of the impact of trade liberalisation on farming and, more particularly, on small farmers throughout the world. Much of the material is well known, but Rosset provides flashes of insight. For instance, he questions the widely held assumption that it is the high level of subsidies that the US and the European community pay to their farmers that makes their produce so cheap. It might seem logical, he says, to blame subsidies, when you see very cheap American maize flooding the Mexican market, but it is wrong: it mistakes cause for effect. Subsidies are triggered by weak commodity prices, not vice versa.

The main cause of the low prices, he says, is the power of the agri-food conglomerates. These have a vested interest in paying as little as possible for their raw materials (crops and livestock) and they use their huge influence within state bureaucracies to stop governments applying effective policies as in the past to regulate supply and demand. As a result, commodity prices continue to drop, often way below production costs, even in the industrialised countries. Thousands of small farmers are put out of business and the governments have to subsidise the big farmers to keep them producing.

Rosset, who lives in Chiapas, Mexico, has an interesting section on the North American Free Trade Area (NAFTA). Because of the cheap US maize pouring into Mexico as a result of NAFTA, Mexican peasant farmers cannot sell their produce. Yet, he says, almost three million mostly poor farmers stubbornly continue to grow maize. How is this possible? Quoting a Mexican study, Rosset says that it happens only because of the remittances sent by migrants in the US, who are in effect subsidising Mexican production. Their action, he says, reflects the peasants' deep cultural resistance to the dislocation and destruction caused by the `free trade' model.

The section of the book concerning the `uniqueness' of food, which leads to the book's title, is the least convincing. Food is not just any merchandise or commodity, say Rosset; it "means rural livelihoods, traditions and cultures and it means preserving, or destroying, rural landscapes". Because it is special, he says, food should not be covered by WTO agreements. But is food so different? Isn't it just as damaging for a country to have its industry and its culture destroyed by cheap imported goods? It is the free trade model as a whole that needs to be rethought, not only its application to farming.

* Peter M. Rosset, Food is different - why we must get the WTO out of agriculture, 2006, joint publication: Canada: Fernwood Publishing; India: Books for Change; Malaysia: SIRD; Southern Africa: David Philip; Rest of the World: Zed Books