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eBook It's My America Too: A Leading Young Conservative Shares His Views on Politics and Other Matters of Importance download

by Ben Ferguson

eBook It's My America Too: A Leading Young Conservative Shares His Views on Politics and Other Matters of Importance download ISBN: 0060590114
Author: Ben Ferguson
Publisher: William Morrow; 1 edition (August 17, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1334 kb
Fb2: 1729 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf docx mbr rtf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

With It's My America Too, Ben Ferguson, the voice of. .Some will not agree with his political and religious views. What he hopes to accomplish, with both his radio show and this book, is to energize future generations about politics. The way to do this is through open communication.

With It's My America Too, Ben Ferguson, the voice of America's youth and the host of The Ben Ferguson Show, one of the country's fastest-growing syndicated radio shows, delivers his views on all the issues, from politics to current affairs to popular culture. Everyone wants to know what Ferguson will say next - and here's your chance. Ben Ferguson is a conservative who is also an independent thinker unafraid to take contrary positions.

Ferguson published his first book, a political work, It’s My America Too .

Ferguson published his first book, a political work, It’s My America Too, published by William Morris/Harper Collins in 2004 which USA Today named a top choice read. In August 2007, Ferguson joined 600 WREC in Memphis as its morning radio host. He was then moved to the afternoon drive show from 4-7 PM CT. On April 20, 2010, Ferguson resigned from WREC. It was then announced that Ben Ferguson would take over the 4-7 PM slot on another local radio station, KWAM.

With It's My America Too, Ben Ferguson, the voice of America's youth and the host of The Ben Ferguson Show, one . An amazing young man,whether you agree with his politics or not. By Thriftbooks. com User, June 4, 2007. In a free society there must be respect for all points of view.

With It's My America Too, Ben Ferguson, the voice of America's youth and the host of The Ben Ferguson Show, one of the country's fastest-growing syndicated radio. Although I had never heard of Ben Ferguson,had never listened to his radio program or even seen him on TV,I was interested in what a young man thought of the way things were going in his country.

IT'S MY AMERICA TOO is broken down into major sections. Son of the South" explains who Ferguson is, what shaped him, and why he is a passionate American patriot. Dubbed an odd duck by public standards, his personal triumphs result from a strong family ethic that values each person within. Careful to remind their son that public radio success can make one egotistical, Ferguson’s parents grounded his ego with humility and thankfulness for his gifts. Tennis inspires him perhaps only second to radio.

It's My America Too: A Leading Young Conservative . Some California conservatives are setting out to create their own idyllic communities in Texas - neighborhoods that espouse conservative Christian values and politics. Liberals need not apply.

Conservative Heroes: Fourteen Leaders Who Shaped America, from Jefferson to Reagan.

His talk-radio show focuses on current events from a conservative point of view. He also hosts a local radio show in Memphis for two hours on weekday mornings. Ferguson also appears frequently on Fox News Channel and CNN. Republican National Convention Appearance.

It’s helpful for us to remember Da Vinci’s quote, because it’s just as true . By becoming a polymath and developing a unique skill set that few others have, then you’ll be able to differentiate yourself and charge more.

It’s helpful for us to remember Da Vinci’s quote, because it’s just as true today. On the other hand, a specialist whose fields becomes obsolete would likely take much more time to adapt to the change and have to start back at the beginning. We’re going to have a dozen careers. Want a quick test to see if you have rare and valuable knowledge?

With It's My America Too, Ben Ferguson, the voice of America's youth and the host of The Ben Ferguson Show, one of the country's fastest-growing syndicated radio shows, delivers his views on all the issues, from politics to current affairs to popular culture. Everyone wants to know what Ferguson will say next -- and here's your chance.

Ben Ferguson is a conservative who is also an independent thinker unafraid to take contrary positions. In It's My America Too, the twenty-two-year-old media star shoots from the hip and the lip on numerous topics. Ferguson tells us why he thinks the voting age should be lowered to sixteen; who the "New Minority" is -- the twenty-something men and women who are overworked, underpaid, overmarketed, and drastically underrepresented; why politicians talk about and at young adults, but never to them; how he feels about everything from homeschooling to sex, NASCAR, and George W. Bush; and much more.

Ferguson's message is clear. He is not on a campaign to reform liberals and turn them into right-wing Republicans. He is presenting his views on American society and challenging those who do not agree with him to an open debate. Some will not agree with his political and religious views. What he hopes to accomplish, with both his radio show and this book, is to energize future generations about politics. The way to do this is through open communication. He is encouraging his generation (and even some in previous generations) to get involved and be heard.

Hip and forthright, funny yet never pedantic, Ferguson offers a fresh viewpoint and insights on topics such as "What the Republican Party can learn from Bill Clinton"; "Why anti-Americanism is our problem"; and "Dubya: my favorite redneck." He reveals a positive outlook on the economy, offers his opinions on bias in the media, and also includes chapters on Donald Rumsfeld, affirmative action, and the values instilled in him by his mother and father.

Ferguson's pride in his country, in his religious beliefs, and in his choices reflects his vision of the American dream. He is informed and determined to make a difference. Youthful as he is, he has a unique perspective not only on America and its history, but also on current events and issues. You may applaud his opinions or perhaps you will disagree with them. But for those of you who are angered by this book, Ferguson instructs: "Don't just get mad. Do something about it."

Comments: (7)
Brightcaster
Unlike many people on both side of the political fence, I actually read this book. And reread it. At least the parts that I found so appalling I initially thought I had misread them. My mom got me this book one day. Her intentions were very kind, after all, like the author, I was a young individual with an interest in politics.

Unfortunately, the simularities between Ben and I stop there.

Admittedly, the process of recieving and reading this book was an interesting one. Being a younger individual at the time with a basic grasp on modern politics, I was eager to learn more about the viewpoints of popular Conservatives. Despite being a moderate on most political issues, I gave it a shot. One look at the book and it certainly reels you in. Mr. Ferguson's priceless pose on the cover of the book is only topped by his hair, which immediately brings to mind the hard, glistening carapace of an exotic beatle.

The book is an easy read; that much is undeniable; even at a moderate pace the book can be finished in a few days. However, the content is not as desirable as it's pace. The young Ferguson brings to mind a bare-bones, dumbed-down versian of popular Conservative pundits for the most part, while several notable...quirks arise. By quirks I mean certian undeniably ignorant or hippocritical features that are either ignorant or unintended, but it still makes you wonder about how much attention was paid to the writing and editing of this book.

In the beginning, I found myselt admittedly in agreement to Ben's feelings about blanket-statements made towards Republicans and Conservatives. With the thought that perhaps this book actually possessed informative content, I was appalled shortly thereafter, as in the following pages Ben Ferguson made the same blanket-statements and generalizations about Liberals and Democrats, statements he condemned in the previous section. Also, being a self-declared "Southern gentleman," he defends the "New South" and hates generalizations made about his part of the country. Then, in an almost predictable fashion, he goes on to complain about how rude Northerners are. I have no love for such partisan double-standards on either side of the fence. Standing as another gem of uncommon ignorance, Ben declares he wouldn't vote a women into the Presidential office (even if it was his own mother, he notes) because he believes she wouldn't be taken seriously by leaders of foreign nations. I trust I do not have to delve into the rediculous nature of this statement. Ben's book can be likened to a very bland apple with several rotten spots.

However, I do have one positive thing to say about this book. Due to the simplistic and extremely basic nature of both its written style and the author's political viewpoints, it can provide a young person with an interest in politics a basic overview of some Conservative viewpoints, bare-bones as they may be.

...That is, if he or she is mature enough to root out the obvious sexism and almost clockwork hippocracy.
Datrim
To be honest I thought I would disagree with every word in this book. Strangely I agreed with parts of it. I believe the 16 year old voting age had some merit. I agree with him that we as Americans should not expect other governments and nations to agree and support every action America takes. After all, they are their own democracies with their own voting public. Now the parts that I disagreed with, I really disagreed with about. Early in the book, he bashes Hollywood. OK, if you don't want to take an actor seriously because he is a liberal actor, fine but obviously a liberal actor has just as much right to make his opinion known as a 13 year old radio talk show host, which Ferguson was at one time. For example, how many people know that liberal actor Alec Baldwin was a political science major in college? Doesn't he have as much right and at least expertise in politics as Ferguson did at 13? Second, it wasn't the dems who elected an actor to political office and then the presidency.

Ferguson also appeals to anti-intellectualism. He says the left should just make their case in a straightforward way but using the "ah shucks, I am just a folksy down home American who watches NASCAR" line isn't all that straight forward to me. It is kind of manipulative. Sarah Palin has really runned with this image. Ferguson says that Bill Maher talks over conservatives when they try to talk on his show. Later he applauds Rush Limbaugh because Limbaugh could "be brassy and cut people off" and "I was impressed with the way he could control the conversation." So, when Maher did it, it was bad, when Limbaugh was even a bigger jerk, that was good. If Ferguson wants to see people get cut off and being talked over, then listen to a liberal trying to make a point on Fox News. When they do have a liberal during a discussion. When they do they are outnumbered 3-1.

Ferguson also is very criticial of gun control organizations but he implies that all individuals concerned about this issue want to ban and take away all guns. No of course not. Many, including I, just want the government to fully have the power to ensure that criminals don't get guns. Many try to get them at gun stores and that is why the government is necessary.

Of course, a conservative book would be amiss if there was not some defense of keeping governmental endorsement and promotion of religion. He writes, "why is it that the few who hate him (his deity) get their way"? First, if you don't believe in a deity, you can't hate a deity. Those who want the government to be neutral on religion and are nonbelievers can't hate something they don't believe in. In fact, there are quite a few Christians who want the government to be neutral when it comes to religion. Do they hate the god they believe in and worship? Nonbelievers are not attempting (no matter what Ferguson believes) to "hide from morality." The moral ethics of many nonbelievers, humanism, is actually pretty highly developed. It isn't nihilism and it isn't hedonism. If someone wants to worship a deity, fine. Ferguson believes for some reason that nonbelievers are trying to ban or force his deity out of the U.S. Again, it is about government neutrality. Again, no one is stoping someone from praying (no matter what the author thinks) but just that the government shouldn't sponsor or lead prayers themselves.

Lastly, Ferguson's opposition to sex ed involving contraceptives is kind of putting one's head in the sand. Studies show that compherensive sex ed is the most effective way to reduce sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregancies. The fact is, a certain percentage of teens will have sex just as a certain percentage will fall off their bike. That is why we have bike helmets. A certain percentage will get in car crashes. We don't say, don't wear a seat belt because that might encourage driving fast.