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by Amaney A. Jamal

eBook Of Empires and Citizens: Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All? download ISBN: 0691149658
Author: Amaney A. Jamal
Publisher: Princeton University Press (September 9, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 296
ePub: 1952 kb
Fb2: 1917 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr mobi azw lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

This book argues that to understand support for the authoritarian status quo in. .Amaney A. Jamal is the Associate Professor of Politics at Princeton

This book argues that to understand support for the authoritarian status quo in parts of this region-and. Professor Amaney Jamal spoke at the Islamic Center of Greater Cleveland and The City Club of Cleveland in 2017. Jamal is the Associate Professor of Politics at Princeton. Professor Amaney Jamal spoke at the Islamic Center of Cleveland on 9, 2017 at 6:30 pm. Professor Jamal was part of a panel discussion moderated by Professor Pete Moore from Case Western.

This book shows that democracy in the Middle East threatens the interests of the middle classes who rely heavily on American aid. They fear that democracy will bring to power populists wishing to undermine American regional hegemony resulting in a loss of their aid lifeline. The book's compelling argument and its relevance to current policy concerns are significant. ―David Laitin, Stanford University.

Amaney Jamal (born December 30, 1970) is a professor in political science at Princeton University with a focus in Middle Eastern politics. Of Empires and Citizens: Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All?

Amaney Jamal (born December 30, 1970) is a professor in political science at Princeton University with a focus in Middle Eastern politics. Jamal earned her bachelor's degree in politics at UCLA in 1993, followed by her PhD in political science from the University of Michigan. A Carnegie Scholar, Jamal specializes in democratization and civic engagement in the Arab world as well as Muslim and Arab civic engagement in the US. She currently directs the Workshop on Arab Political Development. Of Empires and Citizens: Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All? Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP. Notes.

Home Browse Books Book details, Of Empires and Citizens: Pro-American Democracy. Of Empires and Citizens: Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All? By Amaney A. Jamal. Examining such countries as Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia, Amaney Jamal explores how Arab citizens decide whether to back existing regimes, regime transitions, and democratization projects, and how the global position of Arab states shapes people's attitudes toward their governments.

Published by: Princeton University Press. CHAPTER ONE Introduction: Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All? (pp. 1-37). Since the downfall of the Soviet Union, the world has witnessed a new wave of global democratization. While citizens across the Arab world support democracy and agree that it is the most suitable form of governance to advance the human condition, I have found Jordanians far more hesitant to embrace it than their Kuwaiti counterparts as a reformist doctrine. Jordanians are more likely to bracket democracy for a larger, more important goal: maintaining the national well-being of the entire country.

With Of Empires and Citizens, Amaney Jamal makes an important contribution to our understanding of the conditions that support democratization in the Arab world. Arab citizens, she argues, recognize that their countries are heavily dependent on American patronage  . With Of Empires and Citizens, Amaney Jamal makes an important contribution to our understanding of the conditions that support democratization in the Arab world.

and Citizens : Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All? by Amaney A. Select Format: Hardcover.

Of Empires and Citizens : Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All? by Amaney A. In the post-Cold War era, why has democratization been slow to arrive in the Arab world? This book argues that to understand support for the authoritarian status quo in parts of this region-and the willingness of its citizens to compromise on core democratic principles-one must factor in how a strong . presence and popular anti-Americanism weakens democratic voices.

Tags: authoritarian regimes, democracy, democratization, jordan, kuwait, US foreign policy. constitution (3) cultural landscape (1) democracy (1) democratization (3) development (2) dispute resolution (1) early christianity (1) early modern history (1) economic history (2) egypt (12) elections (2) environmental history (2) european union (1) family law (5) fatah (1) femininity (1) feminism (1) feminist analysis (1) first world war (1) food (1) gaza (1) gender (5) globalization (2) graffiti (1) great britain (1).

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In the post-Cold War era, why has democratization been slow to arrive in the Arab world? This book argues that to understand support for the authoritarian status quo in parts of this region--and the willingness of its citizens to compromise on core democratic principles--one must factor in how a strong U.S. presence and popular anti-Americanism weakens democratic voices. Examining such countries as Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia, Amaney Jamal explores how Arab citizens decide whether to back existing regimes, regime transitions, and democratization projects, and how the global position of Arab states shapes people's attitudes toward their governments.

While the Cold War's end reduced superpower hegemony in much of the developing world, the Arab region witnessed an increased security and economic dependence on the United States. As a result, the preferences of the United States matter greatly to middle-class Arab citizens, not just the elite, and citizens will restrain their pursuit of democratization, rationalizing their backing for the status quo because of U.S. geostrategic priorities. Demonstrating how the preferences of an international patron serve as a constraint or an opportunity to push for democracy, Jamal questions bottom-up approaches to democratization, which assume that states are autonomous units in the world order. Jamal contends that even now, with the overthrow of some autocratic Arab regimes, the future course of Arab democratization will be influenced by the perception of American reactions. Concurrently, the United States must address the troubling sources of the region's rising anti-Americanism.

Comments: (2)
Ann
I am sorry I have not had time to review it in detail--but so far I have browsed over it an it has drawn my attention.
Ndyardin
In the post-Cold War era, why has democratization been slow to arrive in the Arab world? This book argues that to understand support for the authoritarian status quo in parts of this region--and the willingness of its citizens to compromise on core democratic principles--one must factor in how a strong U.S. presence and popular anti-Americanism weakens democratic voices. Examining such countries as Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia, Amaney Jamal explores how Arab citizens decide whether to back existing regimes, regime transitions, and democratization projects, and how the global position of Arab states shapes people's attitudes toward their governments.

While the Cold War's end reduced superpower hegemony in much of the developing world, the Arab region witnessed an increased security and economic dependence on the United States. As a result, the preferences of the United States matter greatly to middle-class Arab citizens, not just the elite, and citizens will restrain their pursuit of democratization, rationalizing their backing for the status quo because of U.S. geostrategic priorities. Demonstrating how the preferences of an international patron serve as a constraint or an opportunity to push for democracy, Jamal questions bottom-up approaches to democratization, which assume that states are autonomous units in the world order. Jamal contends that even now, with the overthrow of some autocratic Arab regimes, the future course of Arab democratization will be influenced by the perception of American reactions. Concurrently, the United States must address the troubling sources of the region's rising anti-Americanism.