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by Samuel C. Heilman

eBook Synagogue Life: A Study in Symbolic Interaction download ISBN: 0765804336
Author: Samuel C. Heilman
Publisher: Transaction Publishers (April 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 321
ePub: 1473 kb
Fb2: 1941 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: rtf mobi txt mbr
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Synagogue Life: A Study . .has been added to your Cart. Samuel C. Heilman is the Harold Proshansky Professor of Jewish Studies and Sociology at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York and on the faculty of Queens College

Synagogue Life: A Study . Heilman is the Harold Proshansky Professor of Jewish Studies and Sociology at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York and on the faculty of Queens College.

Heilman, Samuel C. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded on December 19, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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Heilman takes a synagogue which he calls ' Kehilat Kodesh' and studies the interactions that take place within i. He writes about gossip and its social functions.

Heilman takes a synagogue which he calls ' Kehilat Kodesh' and studies the interactions that take place within it. His goal is not to forward spiritual life but rather to provide knowledge about the 'symbolic interactions' the face- to -face meetings. He studies their rules and norms and analyzes the public space. Recently Viewed and Featured. The Literature of the United States (Pelican Book A289).

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Rather than using the stranger-as-native approach of classic anthropology, he had instead to begin as a native who discoverd how to look at a ed synagogue life like a stranger.

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Samuel C. Heilman and Steven M. Cohen, both distinguished scholars of Jewish studies, have joined forces in this pathbreaking book to articulate . Synagogue Life: A Study in Symbolic Interaction. Cohen, both distinguished scholars of Jewish studies, have joined forces in this pathbreaking book to articulate this vibrancy and to characterize the many faces of Orthodox Jewry in contemporar.

by Samuel Heilman Page 1. When a Jew Dies SAMUEL C. HEILMAN 8001 KORET JEWISH BOOK . Synagogue Life: A Study in Symbolic Interaction more.

This paper describes the way that people for whom religion is at the heart of their cultural and personal life try to cope with their problems via religious dogma or practise more. Page 1. HEILMAN 8001 KORET JEWISH BOOK AWARD IN PHIl. OSOPHY AND THOUGHTT HENRY HEIUAH 3 MAR. i. 1908 -MAft. 996 rawt TIK iuw DEV0TED HUSBAND GRANDFATHER Page 2. Page .Publication Date: 2002.

Synagogue Life: A Study in Symbolic Interaction. By Samuel C. Heilman. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976. In this book Samuel Heilman attempts to describe a Orthodox Jewish synagogue from a viewpoint as participant observer, with a minimum Sociological lingo. The interaction with the Orthodox Jewish synagogue is where he gets a majority of his data. Samuel makes it clear that his book is not about the religion or essence of Orthodox Jews.

GANS, HERBERT 1979 Symbolic Ethnicity: The Future of Ethnic Groups and Cultures in America. 1976 Synagogue Life: A Study in Symbolic Interaction. Ethnic and Racial Studies 2 (January): 1–20. GARFINKEL, H. 1967 Studies in Ethnomethodology. Englewood Cliffs, . GOFFMAN, ERVING 1963 Behavior in Public Places. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1978 Constructing Orthodoxy. Society, 15 (4): 32–40. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Via a participant-observer approach, Synagogue Life analyzes the three essential dimensions of synagogue life: the houses of prayer, study, and assembly. In each Heilman documents the rich detail of the synagogue experience while articulating the social and cultural drama inherent in them. He illustrates how people come to the synagogue not only for spiritual purposes but also to find out where and how they fit into life in the neighborhood in which they share.

In his new introduction, Heilman discusses what led him to write this book and the process of personal transformation through which he, as an Orthodox Jew, had to go in order to turn a disciplined eye on the world from which he came. Rather than using the stranger-as-native approach of classic anthropology, he had instead to begin as a native who discoverd how to look at a once-taken-for-granted synagogue life like a stranger. In the afterword, arguing for the efficacy of this approach, Heilman offers guidance on how natives can use their special familiarity and still be trained to distance themselves from their own group, making use of the disciplines of sociology and anthropology. Synagogue Life offers a fascinating portrait that has something to say to social scientists as well as all those curious about what happens in the main arena of Orthodox Jewish community life.

Comments: (2)
Ballazan
Heilman takes a synagogue which he calls ' Kehilat Kodesh' and studies the interactions that take place within it. His goal is not to forward spiritual life but rather to provide knowledge about the 'symbolic interactions' the face- to -face meetings . He studies their rules and norms and analyzes the public space. He writes about gossip and its social functions.

This book will give new knowledge about synagogue life to most readers. It is unlikely however to send anyone racing back to their siddur after having been long away from it.
MisterQweene
A case study of a small Orthodox synagogue (apparently on the strict end of modern Orthodoxy) in the early 1970s; although the location is not identified, the author leaves a variety of clues suggesting that it is in a transitional neighborhood in the west side of (I think) Philadelphia. Heilman discusses interpersonal relationships, worship, study and other activities of this congregation.

Parts of Heilman's portrait seemed familiar to me; others didn't quite describe what I personally was familiar with, but nevertheless seemed like a plausible description of the congregation involved. I was a little surprised by how sexist and ideologically homogenous the synagogue seemed to be- but the first makes sense given that the book was written in the 1970s (before feminism had begun to influence even Orthodoxy) and the second makes sense given that it was located in Philadelphia (a bigger city than where I live, and thus one where congregations can appeal to a much narrower slice of the Jewish pie). It reads little too much like a dissertation to my taste- by which I mean, it was quite dry.