carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Hunted Through Central Asia

eBook Hunted Through Central Asia download

by Paul Nazaroff,Malcolm Burr

eBook Hunted Through Central Asia download ISBN: 0192852957
Author: Paul Nazaroff,Malcolm Burr
Publisher: Oxford University Press (December 23, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1221 kb
Fb2: 1446 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr azw docx mobi
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Paul Nazaroff (Pavel Stepanovich Nazarov) (died 1942) was a Russian geologist and writer who was caught up in the Russian Revolution, and became the leader of a plot to overthrow Bolshevik rule in Central Asia.

Paul Nazaroff (Pavel Stepanovich Nazarov) (died 1942) was a Russian geologist and writer who was caught up in the Russian Revolution, and became the leader of a plot to overthrow Bolshevik rule in Central Asia. He was born in Orenburg about 1890, the son of the local mayor and mine owner. He qualified as a geologist at the University of Moscow

Hunted Through Central Asia also offers a fascinating introduction to the life and times of Nazaroff by Peter . About the Authors: Pavel (Paul) Nazaroff was a Russian agent.

Hunted Through Central Asia also offers a fascinating introduction to the life and times of Nazaroff by Peter Hopkirk, as well as an Epilogue in which Hopkirk includes details of the y's life after his dramatic escape from the Cheka. Anyone who enjoys a good spy novel will be thrilled by this true story of espionage and international intrigue. Peter Hopkirk (1878-1954) was also the author of The Great Game, Setting the East Ablaze, Trespassers on the Roof of the World, and Foreign Devils on the Silk Road.

Hunted Through Central Asia book. everything i like in a book. first published in 1932. translated from Russian by Paul's friend Malcolm Burr. My position was uncomfortable. Interesting memoire of an isolated place at a tumultuous moment in history.

Paul Nazaroff was a Russian geologist, naturalist and sportsman living in Tashkent at the time of the Bolshevik revolution

Paul Nazaroff was a Russian geologist, naturalist and sportsman living in Tashkent at the time of the Bolshevik revolution. He was arrested, gaoled and interrogated by the Cheka on suspicion of being involved in the y movement in Russian Turkestan. Naturally he denied being a participant, although enough hints appear in this autobiographical work (covering 1918 to 1920) to make it plain that he was a ringleader.

Hunted through Central Asia. By Paul Nazaroff, translated by Malcolm Burr, introduction by Peter Hopkirk. pp. xii, 336, map. Oxford and New York, Oxford University Press, 1993. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 24 September 2009. Export citation Request permission.

My position was uncomfortable. Here was I, in an absolutely exposed place, with Red Guards and commissars on every side. I had very little money left and no means of transport at al. Paul Nazaroff was the ringleader of a desperate plot to overthrow the Bolsheviks in Central Asia in 1918. He was betrayed to the Secret Police, who declared him 'the most dangerous y at large in the Tashkent region'.

Paul Nazaroff was the ringleader of a desperate plot to overthrow the Bolsheviks in Central Asia in 1918. Burr, Malcolm (trn); Nazaroff, Paul. ISBN 10: 0192803689 ISBN 13: 9780192803689

Paul Nazaroff was the ringleader of a desperate plot to overthrow the Bolsheviks in Central Asia in 1918. He was betrayed to the Secret Police, who declared him "the most dangerous y at large in the Tashkent region. Thus began his extraordinary catalogue of adventures, "a long and distant odyssey which would take me right across Central Asia. over the Himalayas to the plains of Hindustan. ISBN 10: 0192803689 ISBN 13: 9780192803689.

by Paul Nazaroff · data of the paperback book Hunted through Central Asia: O. .Hunted through Central Asia: On the Run from Lenin's Secret Police.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Paul Nazaroff books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Hunted Through Central Asia. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Hunted through Central Asia. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Hunted through Central Asia from your list? Hunted through Central Asia. Published 1993 by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York.

The story of Pavel Nazaroff reads more like something out of a spy thriller than one man's true story. Nazaroff, the ringleader of a plot to overthrow Bolshevik rule in Central Asia in 1918, was betrayed to the dreaded Cheka, or Bolshevik secret police, who quickly condemned him to death as "a known enemy of the proletariat." Just before his execution, however, a White Russian uprising stormed the prison in Tashkent where Nazaroff was held and in the confusion he escaped. And so began what he was later to describe as "a long and distant odyssey which would take me right across Central Asia, to the mysterious land of Tibet, and over the Himalayas to the plains of Hindustan." On his journey we was aided by the Kirghiz and the Sarts, Moslem peoples who also detested the Bolsheviks. At one point, Nazaroff was walled up in a Sart's dwelling for his own protection, and for many months he lived "the life of a hunted animal." As the months passed, Nazaroff realized that his counter-revolutionary cause was a hopeless one, and that his only recourse was to flee across the world's tallest mountain range into China. The final stage of his adventure, in which he must evade both the pursuing Cheka and the Chinese border guards, will keep readers on the very edges of their seats. Hunted Through Central Asia also offers a fascinating introduction to the life and times of Nazaroff by Peter Hopkirk, as well as an Epilogue in which Hopkirk includes details of the counter-revolutionary's life after his dramatic escape from the Cheka. Anyone who enjoys a good spy novel will be thrilled by this true story of espionage and international intrigue.
Comments: (7)
Direbringer
I was thrilled to read the book as a part of my delving into the history of Central Asia between the late 19th century and the early 20th century. It was a great compliment to The Spy Who Disappeared: Diary of a Secret Mission to Russian Central Asia in 1918. The introduction to the whole era was the excellent The Great Game: The Struggle for Empire in Central Asia (Kodansha Globe) and the eye opening Like Hidden Fire: The Plot to Bring Down the British Empire both by the eminently readable Peter Hopkirk.
Cordanara
Not only exciting but also very descriptive of Central Asia and its Muslim and Russian inhabitants during Russia's Civil War between the Bolshevik Reds and White Army of the Czar. I learned how it was possible for the Bolsheviks to gain the upperhand in Central Asia during this critical period in Russia's history. The author, although a mineralogist/geologist, is also a naturalist, describing in great detail the flora and fauna of Central Asia. Excellent book (written while in hiding from the Cheka, first secret police of the USSR).
Brannylv
It was interesting if you are looking for birds, flora and other wildlife. I was hoping for more in depth political espionage, and other interactions with the different cultures he had encountered.

Best regards, Max
sobolica
This is an amazing story of hide and seek that probably could no longer happen due to modern technology. Not only is it an adventure story, but Nazaroff is a botanist and a geologist and gives fantastic descriptions of the natural world around him, beautiful or not. A great insight into life in Central Asia before and after the Bolshevik Revolution.
ACOS
I thoroughly enjoyed Nazaroff's tales of being on the run from the Bolsheviks. He was a man of obvious intellectual talent and his many academic interests put him in contact with a wide variety of people that helped him on his long, difficult journey fleeing from the communists. There were times I couldn't put down his gripping stories of nearly getting caught or how he was even sealed up in an earthen wall to hide.

One thing other reviews mentioned, but that isn't mentioned at all on the back cover of the book is how much time Nazaroff spends detailing geological features of the areas he's travelling through and about the natural history of these areas. Some of it is interesting, but at times, it just becomes very tedious and I found it quite boring. When he's talking about how this stuff could reshape the economic future of areas, I found that interesting, but when he's simply describing finding mineral seams in rocks, I couldn't have cared less.

Overall, a very interesting read, but there are a few boring spots one has to plow through.
Marilace
This book, first published seventy years ago, is a harrowing account of the author's escape from the Soviet Cheka shortly after the Russian Revolution. He was the leader of a group of rebels in Turkestan, and as such was a much sought after prize for the Bolsheviks, who wanted to eliminate him and all other opponents of their regime. The story is told in such a low-key way, however, that often it becomes a mere travelogue rather than a tale of action. For all of that, the underlying terror comes through, and the danger and hardship which the author faced appears very real to the reader. In addition to the main story, this book is also full of geography, geology, zoology, botany and history. The author was certainly a well-rounded individual, in addition to being very, very brave. We don't see many heroes such as this man in our times, and it's rewarding to read that such people were more than wiling to risk everything to combat tyranny.
Karg
Paul Nazaroff was a Russian geologist, naturalist and sportsman living in Tashkent at the time of the Bolshevik revolution. He was arrested, gaoled and interrogated by the Cheka on suspicion of being involved in the counter-revolutionary movement in Russian Turkestan. Naturally he denied being a participant, although enough hints appear in this autobiographical work (covering 1918 to 1920) to make it plain that he was a ringleader.

Nazaroff managed to avoid the firing squad until Tashkent was liberated by the Whites. This liberation was short lived as the Soviet forces soon prevailed in a bloody counter-attack ending in mass executions. Nazaroff was forced into hiding amongst the native population - he spoke the local languages and had many contacts. The continuing search for him by the Bolsheviks forced him to move across Turkestan using forged papers and the aid of friends, all the time being in danger of being recognised. Nor did his troubles end upon crossing the Soviet border into China.

His account not only covers his struggle to survive, but also highlights the destructive and bestial behaviour of the revolutionaries towards people and property, noting how the resources of this rich province were being squandered as uneducated brutes were placed in positions of authority with no check on their powers. But this is only part of the tale as the geology and natural history encountered en route are related in great detail, perhaps too much for some readers, while the lives of the native peoples, the Sarts and the Kirghiz, are illustrated by one of the few Europeans to have spent months living amongst them as an outsider in a family home.

Little of political history will be found (other than an eyewitness account of the Bolsheviks in action and popular response) as the author was careful not to divulge confidences that even in 1932 had the potential to incite reprisals. What is presented is a panorama of a region that would remain closed to the outside world for seventy years as well as the courage and perseverance of the author. A brief epilogue by Peter Hopkirk details Nazaroff's later life.