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eBook Labor’s Great War: The Struggle for Industrial Democracy and the Origins of Modern American Labor Relations, 1912-1921 download

by Joseph A. McCartin

eBook Labor’s Great War: The Struggle for Industrial Democracy and the Origins of Modern American Labor Relations, 1912-1921 download ISBN: 0807823724
Author: Joseph A. McCartin
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1st Edition edition (February 9, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1867 kb
Fb2: 1876 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw mbr mbr azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. This is the best book ever written about American labor in the era of World War I. "Michael Kazin, author of "The Populist Persuasion: An American History".

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Since World War I, says Joseph McCartin, the central problem of American labor relations has been the struggle among workers, managers, and state officials to reconcile democracy and authority in the workplace.

Labor's Great War book. In his comprehensive look at labor issues du. Specifications.

during the Great War. McCartin argued, "Few groups during the war had fed so lavishly as labor on hopes for the aftermath. Samuel Gompers, had viewed the crisis as a crucible in which he might forge permanent gains for organized labor

and the Origins of Modern American Labor Relations, 1912-1921

By Joseph A. McCartin. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

By Joseph A. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 03 March 2009. Send article to Kindle. To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-replyridge. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

M Poole, Workers' Participation in Industry (2nd edn 1978).

Since World War I, says Joseph McCartin, the central problem of American labor relations has been the struggle among workers, managers, and state officials to reconcile democracy and authority in the workplace. In his comprehensive look at labor issues during the decade of the Great War, McCartin explores the political, economic, and social forces that gave rise to this conflict and shows how rising labor militancy and the sudden erosion of managerial control in wartime workplaces combined to create an industrial crisis. The search for a resolution to this crisis led to the formation of an influential coalition of labor Democrats, AFL unionists, and Progressive activists on the eve of U.S. entry into the war. Though the coalition's efforts in pursuit of industrial democracy were eventually frustrated by powerful forces in business and government and by internal rifts within the movement itself, McCartin shows how the shared quest helped cement the ties between unionists and the Democratic Party that would subsequently shape much New Deal legislation and would continue to influence the course of American political and labor history to the present day.
Comments: (5)
Fordrelis
For those who thought FDR was the leading left leaning progressive President with the "New Deal" social engineers should give pause and think again. Woodrow Wilson, his progressive labor leaning and political appointments were the foundation and building block for organized labors growth during the Great War. It was a war fought on two fronts one overseas with modern weapons of destruction and the other battle here at home over power and autocracy in the workplace. It would seem that political democracy had grown roots in the private industrial environment. Labor peace would come at a price. McCartrin's historical and well documented portrayal of the struggle for "industrial democracy" between 1912-1921 establishes an understanding about modern labor/management relations well into the twenty-first century. For labor to known where it is heading McCartin describes where organized labor struggles began. McCartin's objective discussion lends itself to a side of history less reported. The author presents the facts truthfully and without elaborate embellishment.
digytal soul
This book catalogs in great detail the various labor-related alphabet governmental agencies of WWI, especially the WLB, and their interventions in some of the major labor disputes of WWI. Obviously much research has gone into detailing names of key players and the sequence of events. But this book is supposed to be about industrial democracy. While it is stressed that the term "industrial democracy" came to the fore during this period, there is limited coverage of why this is so and the nature of any industrial democracy that may have been established. No where in the book is there a detailed look at how industrial democracy worked in an actual place of work. Many obvious questions are left unanswered. How widespread was any such industrial democracy? How did the typical worker or the media react to the concept? How did shop committees and trade unions interact? Also, it is unclear as to what the author's claims are regarding industrial democracy's lasting effects. He clearly shows that employers dominated the ERP's of post-WWI. The New Deal intervention in labor affairs was clearly not one of instituting democracy. McCartin does indicate that labor relations of the current period seem to have come almost full circle to some form of 19th century thinking. Basically, McCartin's book seems to indicate that "industrial democracy," whatever that was, was not much more than a blip on the screen of labor history. His book needed to focus far more on just what industrial democracy is and its difficulties and transience in real working peoples lives as well as an institution. The role of the AFL in stifling industrial democracy is given insufficient weight.
saafari
This is a wonderful history of labor and "industrial democracy" in the World War I era. Mr. McCartin writes with bold force about the idea of "industrial democracy" and how it helped to shape the American labor movement at a pivital point in this nation's history. Mr. McCartin's illumination of Frank Walsh's role in this interesting period was particularly insightful. In addition to being painstakenly researched, this book was written with a style rare for most history books. This is clearly the best book yet written about labor in World War I.
Ziena
The author provides great detail about the WWI industrial democracy debate. As a student, I found this book very useful in developing my own work and understanding of that time period's labor movement. Great resource for researchers. Two thumbs up!
TheFresh
I throughly enjoyed this insightful book