carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Network Models of the Diffusion of Innovations (The Hampton Press Communication. Quantitative Methods in Communication)

eBook Network Models of the Diffusion of Innovations (The Hampton Press Communication. Quantitative Methods in Communication) download

by Thomas W. Valente

eBook Network Models of the Diffusion of Innovations (The Hampton Press Communication. Quantitative Methods in Communication) download ISBN: 1881303217
Author: Thomas W. Valente
Publisher: Hampton Pr (January 1, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1717 kb
Fb2: 1212 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: azw lit docx mobi
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Tom Valente is an gnized scholar in social network analysis and health communication. In this book, he offers a very readable description of how social networks can be used to understand the transmission of new ideas through society.

The diffusion of innovations occurs among individuals in a social system . Unknown Binding, 192 pages.

The diffusion of innovations occurs among individuals in a social system, and the pattern of communications among these individuals is a social network. The network determines how quickly innovations diffuse and the timing of each individual's adoption. The book thus analyses how social networks structure the diffusion of innovation. Published January 1st 1995 by Hampton Press (NJ). Network Models of the Diffusion of Innovations (Quantitative Methods in Communication Subseries). 1881303225 (ISBN13: 9781881303220).

Quantitative methods in communication. Hampton Press, xiii, 171 . oogle Scholar. Ryan, R. and N. Gross, The Diffusion of Hybrid Seed Corn in Two Iowa Communities. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 1999. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. 8. Rogers, . Diffusion of Innovations. Rural Sociology, 1943. E. Katz, and H. Menzel, Medical Innovation: A Diffusion Study. New York: Bobbs Merrill.

PDF The role of social networks in promoting the diffusion of innovations is widely recognised, but networks .

PDF The role of social networks in promoting the diffusion of innovations is widely recognised, but networks are used more as a vague metaphor than a. .With this system, user can know about their social network based on their friend list on twitter. Kata Kunci : Social Network Analysis, Betweenness Centrality, Closeness Centrality.

Network models of the diffusion of innovations. TW Valente, RL Davis. TW Valente, EM Rogers. Science communication 16 (3), 242-273, 1995. Social network predictors of bullying and victimization. Computational & Mathematical Organization Theory 2 (2), 163-164, 1996. Social network thresholds in the diffusion of innovations. Social networks 18 (1), 69-89, 1996. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 566 (. 1999. M Mouttapa, T Valente, P Gallaher, LA Rohrbach, JB Unger. Adolescence 39 (154), 315, 2004.

This book analyzes how social networks structure the diffusion of innovations. Finally, individuals interested in developing, evaluating or understanding communication campaigns and media effects can use these concepts to improve their work. Contents: INTRODUCTION.

Diffusion of innovations is a theory that seeks to explain how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread. Rogers argues that diffusion is the process by which an innovation is communicated over time among the participants in a social system

1995) Network Models of the Diffusion of Innovations (Hampton Press, Cresskill, NJ. 2014) Emergence of multiplex mobile phone communication networks across rural areas: An Ethiopian experiment.

1995) Network Models of the Diffusion of Innovations (Hampton Press, Cresskill, NJ). (2014) Emergence of multiplex mobile phone communication networks across rural areas: An Ethiopian experiment.

Models of communication are conceptual models used to explain the human communication process. The first major model for communication was developed in 1948 by Claude Elwood Shannon and published with an introduction by Warren Weaver for Bell Laboratories.

This text presents a key to understanding how ideas, products and opinions "take off" and spread throughout society - referred to as the diffusion of innovation - and provides a means to estimate how fast or slow that spread occurs. The diffusion of innovations occurs among individuals in a social system, and the pattern of communications among these individuals is a social network. The network determines how quickly innovations diffuse and the timing of each individual's adoption. The book thus analyses how social networks structure the diffusion of innovation. Chapter 1 reviews the diffusion of innovation theory, network analysis, and the datasets used as examples. Chapter 2 reviews prior research conducted on threshold and critical mass models. Chapter 3 presents relational network models of diffusion which posit that individuals adopt innovations based on their direct relations with others in their social system, and the next chapter provides structural network models of diffusion which posit that individuals adopt innovations based on their position in the social system, regardless of direct ties to specific others. Threshold and critical mass models of diffusion are presented in chapters 5 and 6. Chapter 7 develops a general threshold model of adoption based on social networks. This book is addressed to researchers, policymakers and students interested in diffusion of innovation or network analysis. It is also meant for those interested in studying the process of social change as represented by a diffusion network paradigm. Finally, individuals interested in developing, evaluating or understanding communication campaigns and media effects can use these concepts to improve their work.
Comments: (3)
Meztisho
Though published in 1995, this book reads like it was written 20 years prior. The core chapters are each devoted to a different class of network models (relational networks, structural networks, threshold models, critcal mass models, and a chapter for 'others') and the author compares predictions made by each type to classic historical data regarding farmers in Brazil, birth control in Korea, and antibiotics among doctors. However, not a mention is made of the 'Santa Fe' school of innovation diffusion research and references to the wealth of recent research is scant (A survey of 2 randomly selected pages from the References show that, of the 35 works that appear on the pages, only 8 were less than 5 years old while 13 were from more than 20 years prior to the book's publication).
Further, the book doesn't seem to be well-suited to any particular kind of reader: because it lacks end of chapter exercises, it would not make a good textbook; it is extraordinarily light on mathematics (considering the subject matter) to be helpful to the serious scholar; and it doesn't cover the topics discussed nearly as well as, say, Everett Rogers' _Diffusion of Innovations_ or Duncan Watts' _Small Worlds_ to be interesting to the average reader. The body of innovation diffusion research is too rich to waste time reading this book, unless it's just for reference purposes.
The Sinners from Mitar
This book is an excellent review of the applications of social network analysis to health communication research. Tom Valente is an internationally-recognized scholar in social network analysis and health communication. In this book, he offers a very readable description of how social networks can be used to understand the transmission of new ideas through society. This knowledge is particularly important for the design of media-based education and advertising campaigns, because it explains how information is passed from person to person within a social network. Despite the rigorous mathematics underlying social network analysis, Dr. Valente presents the information in a way that can be understood by most applied social scientists. A must-read for social scientists who are interested in social networks!
Tat
A good introductory book. I would save your money though and buy his more recent works. They are much more relevant and expanded.