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eBook Weapons and Hope download

by Freeman Dyson

eBook Weapons and Hope download ISBN: 006039031X
Author: Freeman Dyson
Publisher: Harpercollins; 1st edition (March 1, 1984)
Language: English
Pages: 340
ePub: 1412 kb
Fb2: 1440 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf lit rtf mobi
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Lewis' better essays, without the partisan glibness in which Lewis occasionally indulged

Lewis' better essays, without the partisan glibness in which Lewis occasionally indulged.

Lewis' better essays, without the partisan glibness in which Lewis occasionally indulged

Lewis' better essays, without the partisan glibness in which Lewis occasionally indulged.

Weapons and Hope book. He theorized several concepts that bear his name, such as Dyson's transform, Dyson tree, Dyson series, and Dyson sphere.

Freeman John Dyson FRS (born 15 December 1923) is an American . Weapons and Hope, 1984 (Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award). Origins of Life, 1985.

Freeman John Dyson FRS (born 15 December 1923) is an American theoretical physicist and mathematician, of British origin, known for his work in quantum electrodynamics, solid-state physics, astronomy and nuclear engineering. Dyson still hopes for cheap space travel, but is resigned to waiting for private entrepreneurs to develop something new and inexpensive.

Explores ways to live and survive in a nuclear age and examines the key areas of public morality, weapons technology, and international policy.

He pins his hopes on small, high-technology conventional weapons, specifically on a conventional ABM system coupled to satellite monitoring. Such a setup, tied to treaties eliminating nuclear weapons, would be able to protect against the treaties' violation. Dyson opposes the arms-controller orthodoxy of mutual assured destruction, or deterrence. Today's great threat, he believes, comes from tactical nuclear weapons, not from the almost obsolete hydrogen bombs.

Freeman John Dyson (born 15 December 1923) is an English-born American physicist, mathematician, and futurist, famous for his work in quantum mechanics, nuclear weapons design and policy.

He was the winner of the Templeton Prize in the year 2000. It has been generally believed that only the complex numbers could legitimately be used as the ground field in discussing quantum-mechanical operators.

How did Freeman Dyson, the world-renowned scientist and public intellectual, wind up. .

How did Freeman Dyson, the world-renowned scientist and public intellectual, wind up opposing those who care most about global warming? . Dyson’s books display such masterly control of complex matters that smart young people read him and want to be scientists; older citizens finish his books and feel smart. Yet even while probing and sifting, Dyson is always whimsically gazing into the beyond.

This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Weapons and Hope by Freeman Dyson published in 1983

This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Weapons and Hope by Freeman Dyson published in 1983. This book is the 612th greatest Nonfiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks.

Explores ways to live and survive in a nuclear age and examines the key areas of public morality, weapons technology, and international policy
Comments: (3)
Jozrone
I bought this book when it first appeared, and bought a new copy because the old one was falling apart. Anyone who works on or is interested in international politics, war studies, or anything connected to them will want to read this. If you missed it, well, there's nothing about it that has gone out of date. The voice of reason does not get old.
Andromajurus
In "Weapons and Hope" Freeman Dyson combines the work of filling in the autobiography he started in "Disturbing the Universe" and the task of reflecting intelligently and critically on how, exactly, man may hope to survive as a species, having created nuclear weapons and having armed several nations with them.

The autobiography part of "Weapons and Hope" takes a different tack from "Disturbing the Universe," its biographical half being largely a chronicle of his father, the elder George Dyson, musician, cashiered teacher, composer, who redeemed himself and made a respectable living in the unlikeliest way imaginable for a musician pressed into World War I - by writing an instruction manual for the use of hand grenades, royalties from which removed his financial burdens for quite some time. Dyson's unflinching honesty in relating the shape of his father's early life is perhaps the best testimonial to that man; one can only hope to be the sort of man who could come through as well in such a recounting as Freeman Dyson's father.

This sort of biographical detail is alternated with a very frank and erudite discussion of how nations actually use weapons to help achieve their national goals, as opposed to how we are taught this happens. As Dr.Dyson is one of that select group of physicists who seem to be consulted on the thornier technical aspects of national defense with regularity through many different administrations, his vantage on the subject matter is as good as one could hope for; his narration is at once clearer, more pleasant to read, and more piercingly accurate than anyone has a right to expect.

Dyson also possesses the integrity to scrupulously separate what he knows to be true from what he believes to be true, something that other scientist-commentators on national defense such as the late Carl Sagan were not always as careful to do. One comes away from Dyson's cogently argued discussion of the several possible paths through the thicket of nuclear defense policy not so much reassured as armed with the information one needs to make the best of what is a grim situation indeed... and feeling as though one has sat with the man and discussed the matter with him at length and rather enjoyably.

Freeman Dyson's gift for presenting even the most esoteric information accessibly and conversationally reminds one of C.S. Lewis' better essays, without the partisan glibness in which Lewis occasionally indulged. Having been a long-time and devoted reader of Dyson's, when I Emailed him to ask about a point of technical history I was looking into several years ago, I had to be careful to remember that we had in fact never met - his writing is so readable and personable that one comes away feeling that one in fact had had the opportunity to discuss his subject with him in person.

Whether you are curious about the actual state of national and global nuclear weapons policy (as opposed to what we have been told for years) and the ways in which we might survive the situation we are now in, or want simply to spend several hours in the most enjoyable way possible, I can recommend "Weapons and Hope" heartily. Paraphrasing C.S. Lewis, this book is a most reliable returner of the reader's penny.
Budar
Physicist Freeman Dyson's first job was working as a staff scientist for a RAF strategic bombing wing during WWII. What he learned there, his experiences studying under Manhattan Project scientists at Cornell, and work on arms control treaties in the early 60s, informs this thoughtful, humble and painstaking examination of arms control and cold war diplomacy.
While not as urgent a read as it might have been ten years ago, Weapons and Hope is still worth reading. We still live in a world with nuclear weapons, and Dyson's thoughts on anti-missile defenses are quite relevant.
--Stefan Jones