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by Benjamin Zachariah

eBook Playing the Nation Game: The Ambiguities of Nationalism in India download ISBN: 8190618644
Author: Benjamin Zachariah
Publisher: Yoda Press (January 1, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 250
ePub: 1340 kb
Fb2: 1633 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf azw lrf doc
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Playing the Nation Game book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Playing the Nation Game: The Ambiguities of Nationalism in India as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Playing the Nation Game book. Start by marking Playing the Nation Game: The Ambiguities of Nationalism in India as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Playing the nation game. the ambiguities of nationalism in India. In this study, Benjamin Zachariah questions the tendency to regard nationalism as a necessary, inevitable and natural basis upon which to organise the world

Playing the nation game. by Benjamin Zachariah. Published 2011 by Yoda Press in New Delhi. Politics and government, Civilization, Nationalism. In this study, Benjamin Zachariah questions the tendency to regard nationalism as a necessary, inevitable and natural basis upon which to organise the world. In doing so, he embarks on a series of reflections on a longstanding project in Indian historiography which has until today not reached successful resolution: that of "decentring" the nation as the central focus of history-writing in and about India.

com's Benjamin Zachariah Author Page. Playing the Nation Game: The Ambiguities of Nationalism in India Jan 1, 2012. Get it by Tuesday, Jul 30 Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). 1 ). Jun 24, 2004.

Nationalism & Patriotism Political Ideologies Books. Playing the Nation Game: The Ambiguities of Nationalism in India. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect.

It provides valuable insight into the peculiar conjunction of nationalist, pan-Islamist, and Marxian discourses which . Benjamin Zachariah, author of Playing the Nation Game: the Ambiguities of Nationalism in India.

It provides valuable insight into the peculiar conjunction of nationalist, pan-Islamist, and Marxian discourses which made Ghadar a unique revolutionary adventure. Harish K. Puri, author Ghadar Movement: Ideology, Organisation and Strategy Maia Ramnath's book on the Ghadar Movement is an impressive accomplishment: it is at once an in-depth monograph surpassing all previous work on the subject, and a model of how world history should be written.

Benjamin Zachariah prophetically titled his 2011 book Playing the Nation Game: The Ambiguities of Nationalism . The current usage of the concepts of nationalism and culture in India has acquired some ugly manifestations

Benjamin Zachariah prophetically titled his 2011 book Playing the Nation Game: The Ambiguities of Nationalism in India. Perhaps he foresaw the variety of nationalisms that would emerge as a legitimating tool for anything that happens in the country. This form of nationalistic fervour is not new in itself. What is new is its state sponsorship. The current usage of the concepts of nationalism and culture in India has acquired some ugly manifestations. It is no more a serious concern about nation or culture, but a rather crude jingoism fed by a populist majoritarian exclusivism.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Benjamin Zachariah books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Playing the Nation Game the Ambiguities of Nationalism in India. The Internationalist Moment.

Benjamin Zachariah, author of Playing the Nation Game: the Ambiguities of Nationalism in India. We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites

Benjamin Zachariah, author of Playing the Nation Game: the Ambiguities of Nationalism in India. We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites.

Zachariah, Benjamin -Anti-colonial Nationalisms: The Case of India, in. .In: Debraj Bhattacharya (ed), Of Matters Modern, Calcutta: Seagull Books, 2008, 330-359.

2012 - Developmentalism and its Exclusions: Peripheries and Unbelonging in Independent India, in: Andrea Fischer-Tahir, Matthias Naumann (H., Peripheralization: The Making of Spatial Dependencies and Social Injustice, Berlin, Springer, 2013. 2011 - Playing the Nation Game: the Ambiguities of Nationalism in India (Delhi: Yoda Press, 2011. Anti-colonial Nationalisms: The Case of India, in: Anna Yeatman and Magdalena Zolkos (eds), State, Security and Subject Formation, New York: Continuum, 133-156.

In Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons, ed.

In Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons, eds. Burton, Antoinette and Hofmeyr, Isabel, 168–89. Duke University Press. New Delhi: Yoda Press.

In his significant new work Playing the Nation Game Benjamin Zachariah examines the tension between the nation idea as a necessary language of legitimacy with which to claim liberation, and its role in disciplining people and their identities in India in the name of national liberation. Focusing on the anti-colonial struggle and the subsequent Nehruvian period, and necessarily on histories of interconnected and travelling ideas, it seeks to show the ambiguities, exclusions and consequent dangers of nationalism, and the ways in which scholarship and politics conspire to reify nationalist frameworks. It explodes spurious claims to indigenous traditions , and argues for a consistent separation of the categories state and nation . In doing so, it examines the historiography of India and of anti-colonial nationalisms, looks at Bengali engagements with progress and British rule, at the invention of Hinduism as a category available for national use, and at Nehruvian nationalism, which with its broad definition of national belonging, fails to delineate nationals from non-nationals. In the process, it provides ways of rethinking the standard narratives of Indian history. Interconnected narratives emerge with a common thread, a concern with writing histories of India that cannot be subsumed within a bland and obligatory history of Indian nationalism. Attempting to open up new lines of thinking, possible research agendas, and ways of reading and teaching Indian history, Playing the Nation Game will be of interest to scholars of history and political studies, as well as to a wider audience of political, concerned persons for whom the claims made upon citizens in the name of nationalism have at times seemed less than comfortable.