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eBook Adventures in Chinese Bureaucracy download

by Eugene Cooper

eBook Adventures in Chinese Bureaucracy download ISBN: 1560727764
Author: Eugene Cooper
Publisher: Nova Science Publishers Inc; UK ed. edition (March 10, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 153
ePub: 1149 kb
Fb2: 1777 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: rtf lit mobi docx
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

Adventures in Chinese Bureaucracy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Adventures in Chinese Bureaucracy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Adventures in Chinese Bureaucracy book. This book is a personal saga of woe and intrigue  . Adventures in Chinese.

This book is a personal saga of woe and intrigue.

In fall 2005, Cooper gave a presentation entitled Adventures in Chinese Bureaucracy at the USC School of Social Work. Professor Cooper’s expertise includes Chinese civilization, Chinese folk custom; the overseas Chinese diaspora; economic al economy; marriage, family and kinship; peasant society; popular culture; and American folklore. Selected Publications: Cooper, G. (2012).

An earlier book, Adventures in Chinese Bureaucracy (Nova Science Pub In. 2000), chronicled his personal tales of woe and intrigue as he endured five years of false starts, detours, dead ends and disappointments while seeking.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The spread and increasing power of bureaucracy - the accelerated growth of large-scale, centralized administrative structures - is one of the most noticed and discussed phenomena of our time.

Eugene Cooper, Adventures in Chinese Bureaucracy: A Saga (Nova Publishers, 2000):11. Gu Gan, Touring Metropolitan Shanghai (The Publishing House, 1984):230. Gu Gan, Touring Metropolitan Shanghai (The Publishing House, 1984):231.

The recent toughening of Beijing’s policy on North Korea is a case study of how policy decisions get made within the Chinese government. The Chinese bureaucracy has been toughening its stance toward the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) regime, seeking to rein in the latter’s nuclear and missile programs. Specifically, the People’s Republic of China’s Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM), the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT), the General Administration of Customs (GAC), and the China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA) recently published announcement number 59.

The historical tradition of bureaucracy in China goes way back to the creation of the Qin dynasty. Many Westerners assume that the bureaucratic system China currently has began somehow with Maoism or the revolution of 1949, but debates on China's. The historical tradition of bureaucracy in China goes way back to the creation of the Qin dynasty. Many Westerners assume that the bureaucratic system China currently has began somehow with Maoism or the revolution of 1949, but debates on China's bureaucratic structure have been going on for millenia.

This book is a personal saga of woe and intrigue. It recounts a seemingly endless succession of false starts, missteps, detours, dead ends, and disappointments, endured over five years, in the ultimately successful pursuit of a sponsoring unit in the People's Republic of China, for a research project on the rural industrial and artisanal enterprises of Dongyang county, Zhejiang Province. We follow the author in his veritable Confucian perambulation from ministry to ministry, bureau to bureau, institute to institute, academy to academy, office to office, university to university, until he finally manages to teach a quid pro quo with Zhejiang University. Under that agreement, the project would be carried out in collaboration with Professor Jiang Yinhuo of the department of economics. The trials, tribulations and humiliations Cooper and Jiang suffered under the close supervision of the county foreign Affairs and Public Security Offices while they gathered their "data" over two field seasons, are described in detail. One comes away with a clear sense of what it is like to live according to the "regulations governing foreigners" in China. Anyone contemplating travel to China, or business dealings with China might find this book a humorous if poignant object lesson in the maniacal persistence required to get things done in People's China.