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eBook After the Sheikhs: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies download

by Christopher M Davidson

eBook After the Sheikhs: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies download ISBN: 0199365288
Author: Christopher M Davidson
Publisher: Not Avail (May 27, 2014)
Pages: 552
ePub: 1253 kb
Fb2: 1965 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit txt lrf azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Politics and Government

But Christopher Davidson takes a punt on collapse coming soon.

Both titles contain a strong element of wishful thinking. But Christopher Davidson takes a punt on collapse coming soon. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Oman form a distinct group

In After the Sheikhs Christopher Davidson argues that the Gulf regimes will be gone at least in their current form .

In After the Sheikhs Christopher Davidson argues that the Gulf regimes will be gone at least in their current form within the next two to five years. Although the demise of the Gulf regimes has long been announced, Davidson s audacious prediction should not be lightly dismissed. -Lord Avebury, Vice-Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Human Rights Group.

What is the secret of the Gulf monarchies’ survival? There are numerous reasons. The support of Western powers, oil wealth and an effective secret police are among them. But in this exceptionally argued book, Christopher Davidson concentrates on the prime reason: the Gulf monarchies enjoy considerable legitimacy from their populations. This fine-tuned monarchical resilience, Davidson argues, cannot be sustained for much longer. Immense internal pressures are building up and the pressure-cooker is about to explode. Davidson marshals an impressive array of evidence. Although the book was never intended to be a crystal ball it is worth noting that the original, 2009 version forecast the collapse of most of the Gulf monarchies within the next decade. In contrast, this final 2012 version contends that most of these regimes - at least in their present form - will be gone within the next two to five years. A very large number of individuals deserve my thanks.

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Indeed, reports of the demise of the Gulf monarchies began to circulate almost as soon as these states emerged during the early 20th century. Pressures from urbanisation, the demands of increasingly literate and educated populations, mass communication, and decline of religious values would transform them into modern democracies. There have been predictions of revolutions, internal collapse and popular uprisings. Yet the Gulf monarchies of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman and Bahrain have proved remarkably resilient.

After the Sheikhs book. But what has ensured their survival over the decades has been a social contract between the monarchs and their citizens. Increasing oil exports and expanding state treasuries inaugurated the monarchies redistribution policies in the 60's and 70's, and the fall of Nasserism after the defeats of '67 and '73 helped take the gloss off of Arab Nationalism.

Noted Gulf expert Christopher Davidson contends that the collapse of the Gulf .

Noted Gulf expert Christopher Davidson contends that the collapse of the Gulf monarchies is going to happen, and always was. The Gulf monarchies (Saudi Arabia and its five smaller neighbours: the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, and Bahrain) have long been governed by highly autocratic and seemingly anachronistic regimes. What's in the Box? 1 x After the Sheikhs The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies.

The Gulf monarchies (Saudi Arabia and its five smaller neighbours: the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar .

The Gulf monarchies (Saudi Arabia and its five smaller neighbours: the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, and Bahrain) have long been governed by highly autocratic and seemingly anachronistic regimes. Yet despite bloody conflicts on their doorsteps, fast-growing populations, and powerful modernising and globalising forces impacting on their largely conservative societies, they have demonstrated remarkable resilience. In this book, however, noted Gulf expert Christopher Davidson contends that the collapse of these kings, emirs, and sultans is going to happen

Comments: (7)
Welahza
Interesting. Clearly wrong in conclusion, but interesting analysis.
Dream
The title and book description are somewhat misleading simply because the author provides no scenarios whatsoever as to what is going to happen to the Gulf regimes or what those societies will look like in the period "after the sheikhs." Others have commented correctly that the book is a collection of facts of the societies themselves, but I thought he would delve into the scenarios of "after" and why they would or would not occur based on the confluence of all the factors, such as Islamism (ISIS, Shia militancy), low oil prices, the disintegration of the world after the Ottoman Empire, and so forth.
The chapter entitled "The Coming Collapse" does not discuss the actual scenarios of collapse at all. Furthermore, it is a bit outdated since the author's information presented terminates around 2011. In addition, I was surprised that he makes no mention at all of the social pressures and impact of the large foreign populations in the gulf countries, and whether those populations would want to be part of the countries they live in (with few rights) or not.
The book was also rather uneven in what it covered. It large parts of the book there is a heavy emphasis on the UAE (especially Abu Dhabi) and very little discussion at all of Kuwait and other countries.
All in all, the book is a disappointment, and simply presents a view of the the Gulf regimes as they were around 2011. I was thinking of giving it only 2 stars, but went for 3.
It's so easy
The writer has a great knowledge about all the countries in the Gulf region and analyses deeply the challenges of the reigning kings, sheiks and emirs. He describes the growing economic, social and political differences between the different classes of citizens and foreign workers as well as the conflicts between Sunnis and Shias in several places. He describes also the surviving strategies of the several rules to face these challenges and the influence of regional and global players like Iran, the US, the UK, Russia and China.
Dibei
Outstanding analysis
ME
A bit outdated as the postscript is from 2013 and with the Syrian war and the invasion in Yemen affecting the region more recently. The overall reasons he states still hold water. A bit academic for my non-fiction tastes.
Error parents
This book, reflecting a journalistic style, is based on thorough research and the author's conclusions - in particular his guess how soon revolutionary destabilizing events all over the Arabian peninsula might take place - is reason eneugh to alarm statesmen and the buisness community alike to take precautionary steps. In spite of some minor editing glitches, the book is recommended as a must for anyone connected to Saudi Arabia, Kuweit, Quatar and the seven United Emirates.
Braswyn
To understand the Persian Gulf and its many challenges, you need to read this book. It's more complicated that it appears.
Very informative. Book in excellent condition. Viewpoint refreshing, although occasional loss of argument in numbing details. A must read for students of Middle East.