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eBook The Existentialist's Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness download

by Gary Cox

eBook The Existentialist's Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness download ISBN: 1441107835
Author: Gary Cox
Publisher: Continuum; 1 edition (January 19, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1576 kb
Fb2: 1960 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi docx lrf lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Philosophy

According to this book, existentialists believe that individuals should take full responsibility for the choices they have made in the past and not have any regrets . I think the Existentialists got a bad rap whilst I was in grad school.

According to this book, existentialists believe that individuals should take full responsibility for the choices they have made in the past and not have any regrets; and individuals should take full responsibility for the choices they make in the present.

Gary Cox. The Existentialist's Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness is an entertaining philosophical guide to life, love, hate, freedom, sex, anxiety, God and death; a guide to everything and nothing. Gary Cox, bestselling author of How. Gary Cox, bestselling author of How to Be an Existentialist and How to Be a Philosopher, takes us on an exciting journey through the central themes of existentialism, a philosophy of the human condition. The Existentialist's Guide fascinates, informs, provokes and inspires as it explores existentialism's uncompromising view of human reality

Book Description If you enjoyed Gary Cox's other works such as 'How to be existentialist', then give this a shot as it goes more into depth.

An entertaining philosophical guide to life, death, everything and nothing! See all Product description.

The Existentialist's Guide fascinates, informs, provokes and inspires as it explores existentialism's uncompromising view of human reality. It leaves the reader with no illusions about how hard it is to live honestly and achieve authenticity. It has, however, a redeeming humour that sets the wisdom of the great existentialist philosophers alongside the wit of great musicians and comedians. A realistic self-help book for anyone interested in personal empowerment, The Existentialist's Guide offers a wealth of profound philosophical insight into life, the universe and everything

Gary Cox. The Existentialist's Guide fascinates, informs, provokes and inspires as it explores existentialism's uncompromising view of human reality

Other theories of the person assert their universality while actually being narrow and culture bound and in chapter 2, The Universe he reminds us wh. .

Written in a similar style, this book casts its net wider than before. Other theories of the person assert their universality while actually being narrow and culture bound and in chapter 2, The Universe he reminds us why existentialism is about indeed about universals.

Universe and Nothingness, a guide to key existentialist themes that, as.The Existentialist’s Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness - Continuum, 2011.

Cox's forthcoming book, How to Be Good, or How to Be Moral and Virtuous in a Wicked World (Bloomsbury, April 2020) will complete his philosophical 'how to' trilogy, adding an exploration of ethics to that of general philosophy and existentialism. The book investigates the phenomenon of moral goodness and what, if anything, it is to be a good person and a paragon of virtue.

See our disclaimer A realistic self-help book for anyone interested in personal empowerment.

The Existentialist's Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness is an entertaining philosophical guide to life, love, hate, freedom, sex, anxiety, God and death; a guide to everything and nothing. A realistic self-help book for anyone interested in personal empowerment, The Existentialist's Guide offers a wealth of profound philosophical insight into life, the universe and everything.

Gary Cox, bestselling author of How to Be an Existentialist and How to Be a.

The Existentialist's Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness is an entertaining philosophical guide to life, love, hate, freedom, sex, anxiety, God and death; a guide to everything and nothing. Gary Cox, bestselling author of How to Be an Existentialist and How to Be a Philosopher, takes us on an exciting journey through the central themes of existentialism, a philosophy of the human condition. The Existentialist's Guide fascinates, informs, provokes and inspires as it explores existentialism's uncompromising view of human reality. It leaves the reader with no illusions about how hard it is to live honestly and achieve authenticity. It has, however, a redeeming humour that sets the wisdom of the great existentialist philosophers alongside the wit of great musicians and comedians. A realistic self-help book for anyone interested in personal empowerment, The Existentialist's Guide offers a wealth of profound philosophical insight into life, the universe and everything.
Comments: (7)
ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
This is worth buying and reading if you want to know the key ideas of existentialism.
Shou
This book presents a comprehensive overview of existentialist thought, mostly focussed on Sartre and de Bovoir. Very informative and enjoyable to read. Highly recommended for anyone interested in learning about existentialism.
Wafi
Great book, and to the point.
Fordregelv
There is a lot to be said about existentialism and existentialists. Thus it is no wonder that Gary Cox has now supplemented his previous book "How to be an Existentialist" (2009 Continuum) with this charming book (about the same size as the first - 168 pages). There is naturally some overlap - he repeats some of the examples he gave, especially in his discussion on bad faith - but he has expanded the discussion of existentialism into other areas that concern one's life. Here he discusses the existentialist's view of nothingness, consciouness, time, freedom and choice, children, the body,love and hate, sexual desire, marriage, emotions, God, and death. Since authenticity and bad faith are absolutely fundamental to the existentialist, Cox has to discuss them again in this book. The approach is slightly different though the examples are the same as those he used before. "The Existentialist Guide to Death, the Universe, and Nothingness" is a useful supplement to Cox's previous book but if one has not heard about existentialism, it will be helpful to read "How to be an Existentialist" first. That book describes Existentialism. This book discusses the things existentialists think about.

The main proposition of existentialism is that "existence precedes essence", not the other way round. We exist and then strive to have purpose and meaning. We do not exist because there is in existence before us a meaning or purpose for or about us. Thus from this simple and fundamental proposition, the existentialist begins to understand himself and the world. He becomes conscious of consciousness and thereby understand how reality becomes real to us. In respect of love, for example, Cox explains that the existentialist is not so much concerned with the romantic or erotic love (though he qualifies it by saying that it also depends on what our idea of romance is). He says that the key question to existentialists is "Why does the lover want to be loved? To understand why the lover wants to be loved is to understand what love is." And with that, Cox brilliantly illuminates another big idea in existentialism - "the Other".

Since the existentialist is preoccupied with truth he seeks authenticity and abhors bad faith - the deliberate distractions that we make for ourselves that distracts us from the responsibility of knowing and understanding the situation we are in so that we do not respond to it in the way we would have otherwise. Bad faith is thus irresponsibility; and as we will have seen (especially from the first book) that responsibility is also a big thing in existentialism. We (alone) are responsible for our actions and our lives and should thus not push this responsibility to someone or something else.
Malhala
This is a great way to get to know a lot of (mostly dead) existentialists whilst still holding down a day job. It is a very concise and precise introduction to the main themes and originators of existentialist philosophy and how they are still relevant to our everyday life. Not exactly a self-help book though, and certainly not a dumbed-down guide.
This is not philosophy-lite despite the jazzy cover and coming in at a mere 182 pages. For example, although Cox deals with Nothingness in 4 pages (which is a considerable saving on Sartre's 700 page `Being and Nothingness') you may need to read those 4 pages a few times very slowly! How about: "Being-in-itself, unlike nothingness, is what it is and not what it is not. Nevertheless, what it is not (nothingness) is. Not in the sense of being it - that would make nothingness indistinguishable from being-in-itself - but in the sense of having to be it." (it's not really too bad in context!)
Cox does not dwell on the somewhat outdated political and social aspects of existentialism and gives a contemporary feel to the ideas. He also uses humour to good effect. His clear understanding of the subject means he can paraphrase and précis complex ideas without over simplification or misinterpretation.
He also manages to convey the positive aspects of our fundamental emptiness and absurdity - if you are prepared to face the facts this can actually be quite inspirational.
This is a seriously good read for those who are philosophically inclined and are looking for a `useful' rather than a purely conceptual treatise.
Mmsa
On the one hand this is a very good introduction to/summary of existentialism. On the other hand, it is not as advertised. The title is obviously a take-off on Douglas Adams' Hitchhikers' Guide series and from the promo's, including those on the dust jacket, I expected this book to be quite humourous. Well, it was very good but humourous it was not (except for a couple of lines early on). It is a serious book and anyone expecting to read The Hitchhiker's Guide to Existentialism will be disappointed.
Butius
Great guide to the rather intimidating philosophy of existentialism.. If you enjoyed Gary Cox's other works such as 'How to be existentialist', then give this a shot as it goes more into depth within the subject and offers the same clever humour. Overall an entertaining and enlightening read that i would highly recommend anyone who wants to give existentialism a shot but is disheartened by the overwhelming and complex tomes of the subject such as "Being and Nothingness", Existentialists Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness is perfect for preparing oneself in tackling the various works of existentialism.