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eBook Giving the Body Its Due (SUNY series, The Body in Culture, History, and Religion) download

by Maxine Sheets-Johnstone

eBook Giving the Body Its Due (SUNY series, The Body in Culture, History, and Religion) download ISBN: 079140997X
Author: Maxine Sheets-Johnstone
Publisher: SUNY Press; First Edition edition (July 1, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 233
ePub: 1963 kb
Fb2: 1912 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mbr docx lit rtf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Philosophy

I do not know of a book that brings together the combination of approaches that this book does. Series: Suny Series, Body in Culture, History, & Religion. Paperback: 254 pages.

I do not know of a book that brings together the combination of approaches that this book does. Herein lies the real strength of the book. Publisher: State University of New York Press (July 1, 1992).

Giving the Body Its Due (SUNY Series, the Body in Culture, History, and Religion) (Suny Series, Body in Culture . The Roots of Power: Animate Form and Gendered Bodies by Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (1994-01-01). by Maxine Sheets-Johnstone.

Giving the Body Its Due (SUNY Series, the Body in Culture, History, and Religion) (Suny Series, Body in Culture, History, Religion).

It is this conception of the body as mere handmaiden to the privileged that the contributors to this book challenge. In the end, these themes show that giving the body its due means forging a metaphysics that upholds the truths of experience. By the evidence they bring forward, they help restore what is properly due the body since Descartes convinced us that mind and body are separate, and that mind is the primary value.

Start by marking Giving the Body Its Due as Want to Read . It has both divided the fundamental integrity of creaturely life and depreciated the role of the living body in knowing and making sense of the world, in learning, in the creative arts, and in self- and interpersonal understandings.

Start by marking Giving the Body Its Due as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It is this conception of the body as mere handmaiden to the privileged that the contributors to this book challenge.

Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. In Mano Daniel & Lester E. Embree (ed., Phenomenology of the Cultural Disciplines. Robert D. Romanyshyn - 1992 - In Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (e., Giving the Body its Due. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Suny Press. From the Mind to the Body: The Cultural Origins of Psychosomatic Symptoms by Edward Shorter. Colin A. Holmes - 1996 - Body and Society 2 (1):113-117. Renaturalizing the Body (With the Help of Merleau-Ponty). Carol Bigwood - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (3):54 - 73.

This book examines the figure of the virgin, a symbol central to many aspects of society and sexuality in nineteenth-century England, and its effects on the Victorian literary imagination. These essays explore the ways in which virginity is not a natural ideal but a complex cultural and literary sign. The authors rethink the virginal as a textual counter-example to the idealization of natural sexuality

The human body has been subject of much debate. How people are defined, and what defined them – be it their anatomy or their energy or both – depends on culture and time.

The human body has been subject of much debate. Culture not only defines how sex is perceived but also how gender is defined. Today gender, sex, and identity continue to be of much debate and change based on what place and people are being examined.

5. This section of my paper is based on a section of The Hermeneutics of Tool-Making: Corporeal and Topological Concepts, Chapter 2 of The Roots of Thinking.

Contemporary theory across a wide range of disciplines denaturalizes the body and reveals it to be a social construction

Contemporary theory across a wide range of disciplines denaturalizes the body and reveals it to be a social construction. Cultural practices which deform, adorn, mutilate, and obliterate the body illustrate that it is an important site for the inscription of culture.

These essays bring together disciplinary understandings of what it is to be the bodies we are. In its own way, each essay calls into question certain culturally-embedded ways of valuing the body which deride or ignore its role in making us human. These ways have remained virtually unchanged since Descartes in the seventeenth century first sharply divided mind―a thinking substance, from the body―an extended substance.The legacy of this Cartesian metaphysics has been to reduce the body by turns to a static assemblage of parts and to a dumb show of movement. It has both divided the fundamental integrity of creaturely life and depreciated the role of the living body in knowing and making sense of the world, in learning, in the creative arts, and in self- and interpersonal understandings. The living sense of the body and its capacity for sense-making have indeed been blotted out by top-heavy concerns with brains, minds, and language, as if these existed without a body.It is this conception of the body as mere handmaiden to the privileged that the contributors to this book challenge. By the evidence they bring forward, they help restore what is properly due the body since Descartes convinced us that mind and body are separate, and that mind is the primary value. Moreover, they help to elucidate what is properly due the body since the more recent twentieth-century western emphasis upon vision effectively reduced the richness of the affective and tactile-kinesthetic body―the body of felt experience―to a simple sum of sensations.Dominant themes that run throughout the essays and that call our attention to the living sense of the body and its capacity for sense-making are: wholeness, the capacity for self-healing, cultural histories of the body, pan-cultural bodily invariants, thinking, emotions, and the body’s wisdom. In the end, these themes show that giving the body its due means forging a metaphysics that upholds the truths of experience.