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eBook The Tao of the Tao Te Ching: A Translation and Commentary (SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture) download

by Michael LaFargue

eBook The Tao of the Tao Te Ching: A Translation and Commentary (SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture) download ISBN: 0791409864
Author: Michael LaFargue
Publisher: SUNY Press; 1st edition (January 17, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1529 kb
Fb2: 1514 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: Political
Subcategory: Philosophy

The Tao of the Tao Te Ching (Suny Series in. .More than any other classical Chinese work, perhaps, the Tao Te Ching has been ripped from its historical, cultural and concretely experiential context.

Series: SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture

Series: SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture. The interpretation offered here is not only historically accurate, but also conveys the spiritual depth of the Tao Te Ching and its contemporary relevance.

Series: SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture. File: PDF, . 4 MB. Читать онлайн.

The interpretation offered here is not only historically accurate, but also conveys the spiritual depth of the Tao Te Ching and its contemporary relevance  . Series: SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture.

The text's authorship, date of composition and date of compilation are debated

The text's authorship, date of composition and date of compilation are debated. The oldest excavated portion dates back to the late 4th century BC, but modern scholarship dates other parts of the text as having been written-or at least compiled-later than the earliest portions of the Zhuangzi.

Tao of the Tao Te Ching, The (S U N Y Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture). Download (chm, 509 Kb). Epub FB2 PDF mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Издание: 1st. Издательство: State University of New York Press. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Издание: 1st. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Darfur: A New History of a Long War (African Arguments). Julie Flint, Alex de Waal.

A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic.

Interprets the concept of "Tao" in the Tao Te Ching as a spiritual state of mind cultivated in a particular school in ancient China, a state of mind which also expressed itself in a simple but satisfying life-style, and in a low-key but effective style of political leadership. Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

The Tao Te Ching (or Daodejing, in pinyin) is a classic Chinese Taoist text dating from at least the fourth century B.

The Tao Te Ching (or Daodejing, in pinyin) is a classic Chinese Taoist text dating from at least the fourth century BC. According to tradition it has its origins even earlier, around the sixth century BC. The title may be translated as Instruction regarding the Way of Virtue. The three greatest Chinese Classical poets, Li Po (Li Bai), Wang Wei, and Tu Fu (Du Fu) lived under the T’ang dynasty during the 8th century AD, and each aligns with one of the three ways of life.

In this new translation and commentary, LaFargue interprets the concept of “Tao” in the Tao Te Ching as a spiritual state of mind cultivated in a particular school in ancient China‚ a state of mind which also expressed itself in a simple but satisfying life-style, and in a low-key but effective style of political leadership. The interpretation offered here is not only historically accurate, but also conveys the spiritual depth of the Tao Te Ching and its contemporary relevance. The translation is made transparent by a design that presents all of the commentary on the page facing the relevant text.
Comments: (5)
FreandlyMan
One of the best books on the tao that I've ever come across. It not only includes the text of the tao te ching, but also explains the language and symbolism from the time and region that it was written. This is different than other books that simply describe what lessons should be learned by people today or perhaps how there is a 'new translation' that makes the passages mean different things. Ultimately, the tao te ching is up to the reader to assess and glean from it what they will rather than be spoon-fed answers, for it is a journey to be taken within yourself. This book serves to explain the history, and perhaps the reasons behind the meanings of the words within the tao.
Nilador
This book is phenomenal I got it for a class and I find myself reading it constantly. Get it it's awesome.
Thorgaginn
I actually just finished an East Asian Religions course taught by the author, which was amazingly insightful and simply a joy to attend. LaFargue knows his stuff!!
Vetibert
Michael LaFargue says the Tao Te Ching is the former even though it's often treated as the latter.

According to LaFargue (my paraphrase), there are two ways to read the Tao Te Ching, just as there are two ways to read any text.

The first -- the one taken by any number of readers of Lao-Tzu, including some "translators" whom LaFargue doesn't name and I won't either -- is to point your face at it and sort of see how it makes you, like, _feel_, you know?

The second, and the one LaFargue favors, is to place the text in the context for which it was written and try to understand what its writer or speaker would have intended by it.

This is the approach LaFargue uses in order to produce his excellent (and thoroughly annotated and cross-referenced) translation of the Tao Te Ching. He also, in an extremely helpful essay on hermeneutics, discusses this approach at length and explains the context in which he believes the text to have been written.

I won't try to discuss every topic he covers, but one extremely helpful point is his identification of much of the text as what he calls "compensatory wisdom." On his view, some of the Tao Te Ching's pithy sayings are intended not as metaphysical speculation but only as counters to contrary human tendencies. (When we say that "a watched pot never boils," we surely do not mean that if you sit there and watch a pot, it will literally _never_ boil. We are merely warning against a common tendency to rush things that can't be rushed.)

This seems to me to be right on the money, and indeed to be pretty widely applicable to Oriental religious literature including the Bible. It is the right way, for example, to read the book of Proverbs, and some of Jesus's sayings from the Christian New Testament as well.

LaFargue's volume, then, may be of interest both to readers of Lao-Tzu and to readers of the Jewish and Christian Bibles. In discussions of "biblical inerrancy" and such, it is too often forgotten that the Bible is ancient Near Eastern literature and therefore not written to modern Western European standards. Inerrantists and religious "liberals" alike could surely profit from greater appreciation of this point; many apparent contradictions just disappear (and so do some theological creeds) once we understand that the text isn't _always_ offering us metaphysical principles.

In any event, widespread reading of LaFargue's book might spare us another spate of ill-considered screeds on "the Tao of" this, that, and the other thing. What a relief that would be.
Winawel
The three way comparison format (english translation, cultural translation, and reasoning for translation based on historical and linguistic fact) and the dry, reserved language give this book the cut to access unique tumblers in the most difficult of locks. LeFargue and his students (he mentions them adding their understanding) paint meaning and understanding like a watercolor, with each layer's contribution plainly visible, rather than the masking qualities of psuedo-scientists' day-glo acrylic or the holistic turtles' enamel pastels. Triangulating one's own understanding from a single source is an unusual treat. For a rational and restrained mind the fit is magic and the bolt of suspicion is thrown back (or a rough slide for some). All the same its the only book in its genre I've been able to wholly admire.