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eBook The Pristine Dao: Metaphysics in Early Daoist Discourse (SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture) download

by Thomas Michael

eBook The Pristine Dao: Metaphysics in Early Daoist Discourse (SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture) download ISBN: 079146475X
Author: Thomas Michael
Publisher: SUNY Press; New ed. edition (May 26, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 182
ePub: 1927 kb
Fb2: 1159 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf lit doc mobi
Category: Political
Subcategory: Philosophy

Thomas Michael's book is a good and focused study exploring the early beliefs of Daoists

Thomas Michael's book is a good and focused study exploring the early beliefs of Daoists. This drumming into my head was a little hard to take.

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This book demonstrates that early Daoist discourse possessed a distinct, textually constituted coherence and a religious sensibility that starkly differed from the intellectual background of all other traditions of early China, including Confucianism.

This book demonstrates that early Daoist discourse possessed a distinct, textually constituted coherence and a religious sensibility that starkly differed from the intellectual background of all other traditions of early China, including Confucianism.

In this article Daoism is analyzed in the context of Chinese culture. In this article Daoism is analyzed in the context of Chinese culture.

The Place of Daoist Culture Within Traditional Chinese Culture: A Reappraisal. Morality and Nature: The Essential Difference Between the Dao of Chinese Philosophy and Metaphysics in Western Philosophy. Qing Xitai - 1998 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 29 (3):72-80. Weidong Yu & Jin Xu - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):360-369.

This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef. Early China, Vol. 30, Issue. THOMAS MICHAEL: The Pristine Dao: Metaphysics in Early Daoist Discourse. SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture. xi, 170 pp. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2005.

In the Shadows of the Dao: Laozi, the Sage, and the Daodejing.

A new reading of Daoism, arguing that it originated in a particular textual tradition distinct from Confucianism and other philosophical traditions of early China. In the Shadows of the Dao: Laozi, the Sage, and the Daodejing. 2008 Standard Catalog of World Coins - 2001 to Date (Standard Catalog of World Coins 2001-Date).

May be you will be interested in other books by Thomas Michael . newSpecify the genre of the book on their own.

May be you will be interested in other books by Thomas Michael: Thomas Michael. Night of the Nazi Zombies. The Pristine Dao: Metaphysics in Early Daoist Discourse by Thomas Michael. Author: Thomas Michael. Title: The Pristine Dao: Metaphysics in Early Daoist Discourse.

Chinese philosophy is the intellectual tradition of the Chinese culture from their early recorded history to the present da. For the first time in Chinese history, we see the birth of the professional teacher, different from the court official. Remove Ads. Advertisement.

Chinese philosophy is the intellectual tradition of the Chinese culture from their early recorded history to the present day. The main topics of Chinese. Main Schools of Thought. The mix of ideas was so vast, that some ancient writers refer to this time as the ‘Hundred Schools’ of thought.

A new reading of Daoism, arguing that it originated in a particular textual tradition distinct from Confucianism and other philosophical traditions of early China.
Comments: (2)
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Daoism is a religious tradition with a long and complicated history. Like all other religious traditions, its march through time has included a lot of adaption and syncretic engagement with religious, philosophical, and political systems. To say something definitive about Daoism in the Tang and Sung dynasties, may not genuinely reflect beliefs from the Warring States period. Trying to decipher what the earliest adherents of Daoism believed requires the researcher to enter into a misty past of myths and ancient symbols, and in a sense, bottle the fog.

Thomas Michael's book is a good and focused study exploring the early beliefs of Daoists. His efforts include an analysis of the earliest available texts, not only the readily recognized "Daodejing" and "Zhuangzi," but discoveries from the Guodian cave finds of 1993 that includes the lesser known "Xicizhuan" and the "Shui Di." He carefully dissects the material and traces symbolic representations and philosophical themes from the earliest writings to later texts, making the case for a clear and coherent body of beliefs existing independent of a growing and competitive Confucian tradition. Generally, there is harmony among the texts, sometimes pleasantly surprising revelations, but Michael's critical analysis also includes points of divergence found in the literature, including the sympathetic but slightly off key "Neiye." I thought Michael's study was fair, well rounded, and comprehensive.

What struck me most about the material was its physicality. Beginning with a cosmogony bound to birthing metaphors rather than Creator and creation mythology, man and the world are seen as body issuing from a mother (Dao), possessing a relationship of dependence and return. Man enters a natural cosmology fully engaged in a "first order harmony" of relationships that sadly also suffers from his willful and intentional actions, requiring him to seek a "second order harmony," a project that forms the crux of his soteriological dilemma. Man is inclined to an independence that is corrupting, requiring him to make corrections. The locus of man's redemption is his body, a microcosm of the larger order, where he engages in a more subtle level of activity more in concert with the Dao of the "first order harmony," the Mother of 10,000 things (to employ language from the tradition). These actions are drawn from an interior spirituality that is never divorced from the physical. It is immanent and holistic in its structure. The dualism sometimes spawned by the transcendental qualities of later Buddhist influences is not present in the early Daoist tradition. This embodied thinking is fully explored by Michael, revealing a unique and interesting religious tradition that is discrete and seemingly pristine.

The sage is the paradigm for religious life. He possesses a shaman-like quality and is a source for correcting activity. True to his project, Michael discusses the role of the sage and its difference from kingship. His reinterpretation of the "Daodejing" as non-political or apolitical is interesting. The early Daoist sage was set above the king in the political hierarchy, with clear social distinctions that produced two levels of responsibility. The sage fulfilled spiritual needs and the king dealt with social concerns. This introduced a catalyst for the sage's hermetic inclinations and a spirituality that saw social influences as corrupting and creating a second nature that confounded man's relationship with the Dao. The relationship between sage and king could be contentious. I think this part of Michael's thesis is fascinating, though I am not entirely drawn into his argument. Julia Ching's study of kingship,Mysticism and Kingship in China: The Heart of Chinese Wisdom (Cambridge Studies in Religious Traditions), is not used in his argument. In fact, it is not even listed in the bibliography. I haven't read it yet, but my understanding is that it is a good study, and its absence here is disappointing. This suggests a weakness in his analysis.

Other criticism of the book: While Michael's writing is good, it suffers from a repetitiveness. The triptych of "Heaven, Earth, and Man" found in Chinese philosophy and his oft references to "first and second order harmony" become so regular as to become a mantra, and later, an harangue. This drumming into my head was a little hard to take. I was also a little disappointed not to see more use of the work of Lakoff and Johnson, only one early citation of Philosophy in the Flesh: the Embodied Mind & its Challenge to Western Thought graces this study. Given early Daoist's emphasis on embodiment, I think their work could have added another level to his analysis. His use of a sociological study by Bryan Turner,Regulating Bodies: Essays in Medical Sociology, while germane to his work, seemed a little odd, and I had to wonder if its employment was right for this study. However, if you accept it at face value, his adoption of Turner's terms seems to fit his analysis.

Overall, a good study. I recommend this book.
Āłł_Ÿøūrš
Thomas Michael expertly and convincingly grounds the texts/intentions of early Daoism in man's quest to first unite with/return to the fundamental, creative forces of the universe, and ultimately to soar beyond these into the ineffable.