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by James Sire

eBook The Universe Next Door: A Guide Book to World Views download ISBN: 0851111882
Author: James Sire
Publisher: Inter-Varsity Press; 3Rev Ed edition (1997)
Language: English
Pages: 264
ePub: 1837 kb
Fb2: 1405 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mbr lit mobi txt
Category: Political
Subcategory: Philosophy

James Sire: The Universe Next Door is a basic catalog of worldviews-that is, of the primary ways people have viewed reality. In part the book is a work of popular intellectual history.

James Sire: The Universe Next Door is a basic catalog of worldviews-that is, of the primary ways people have viewed reality. It begins with Christian theism, the worldview dominant in the seventeenth century and very much alive today, and shows how subsequent worldviews (deism, naturalism, nihilism, existentialism) developed from theism, and then how Eastern pantheism, New Age thought and postmodernism have emerged to further complicate the pluralistic character of our Western culture.

4-12 was derived from James W. Sire's The Universe Next Door: A Basic Worldview Catalog, 3rd 1997, 4th . Orr considered worldviews to originate deep within the constitution of human nature and involving the intellect and the actions we perform

4-12 was derived from James W. Sire's The Universe Next Door: A Basic Worldview Catalog, 3rd 1997, 4th 2004, & 5th 2009 eds. The ch. 3 summary was taken from an article posted on Scribd. The source of ch. 2 was adapted from Sire's Naming the Elephant: Worldview as a Concept. The postscript was written by (the author of) scribd. Orr considered worldviews to originate deep within the constitution of human nature and involving the intellect and the actions we perform. He observed the attacks against the Christian worldview on multiple fronts and held that a proper theological exposition of it was actually its main defense.

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In clear, readable prose, James W. Sire explains the basics of Christian theism, deism, naturalism, nihilism .

In clear, readable prose, James W. Sire explains the basics of Christian theism, deism, naturalism, nihilism, existentialism, Eastern pantheistic monism, New Age philosophy and postmodernism. In clear, readable prose, James W.

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The Universe Next Door: A Guide Book to World Views (Paperback). Published by Inter-Varsity Press. The Universe Next Door: A Basic Worldview Catalogue (Paperback). Published June 1st 2004 by Inter-Varsity Press.

The Universe Next Door: A Guide Book to World Views (Paperback). Paperback, 264 pages.

In "The Universe Next Door", James Sire articulates and discusses all of the major worldviews held by persons today. Since worldviews are important to every individual, this book is relevant and useful for almost everybody. Each worldview is explained quickly and concisely, which means that this book is by no means a comprehensive look at the issue. However, this is a strength rather than a weakness- the short chapters are easy to grasp and Sire relays complicated ideas in an easy-to-understand manner. Sire definitely approaches the issue from a Christian perspective.

The Universe Next Door book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Universe Next Door: A Basic Worldview Catalog as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

For more than thirty years, The Universe Next Door has set the standard for a clear, readable introduction to worldviews. Included in this expanded format are a new chapter on Islam and informative sidebars throughout

Comments: (2)
Hudora
James W. Sire has been a college professor of English literature, philosophy and theology, the chief editor of InterVarsity Press, a lecturer at over two hundred universities in the U.S., Canada, Eastern and Western Europe and Asia, and is the author of books such as Scripture Twisting: 20 Ways the Cults Misread the Bible,Naming the Elephant: Worldview as a Concept,Habits of the Mind: Intellectual Life as a Christian Calling, etc. [NOTE: I am reviewing the original 1976 239-page IVP edition.]

He wrote in the Introduction, "The struggle to discover our own faith, our own world view, our beliefs about reality is what this book is all about. Formally stated, the purposes of this book are (1) to outline the basic world views that underlie the way we in the Western world think about ourselves, other people, the natural world and God or ultimate reality, (2) to trace historically how these world views have developed from a breakdown in the theistic world view, moving in turn into deism, naturalism, nihilism, existentialism, Eastern mysticism and the new consciousness and (3) to encougage us all to think in terms of world views, that is, with a consciousness of not only our own way of thought but also that of other people, so that we can first understand and then genuinely communicate with others in our pluralistic society." (Pg. 15)

He says, "Deism did not prove to be a very stable world view... Preceded by theism, it was followed by naturalism. What made deism so emphemeral?... the inconsistencies within world view itself and the impracticability of some of its principles... Today, we would find even more aspects of deism to question. Scientists have largely abandoned thinking of the universe as a giant clock. Electrons... do not behave like minute pieces of machinery... Furthermore, the personality of man is a 'fact' of the universe. If God made that, must he not be personal?" (Pg. 56)

He argues against naturalism, "could a being whose origins were so 'iffy' trust his own capacity to know? If his mind is coterminous with his brain, if he is only a thinking machine, how can he trust his thought? If consciousness is an epiphenomenon of matter, perhaps the appearance of human freedom which lays the basis for morality is an epiphenomenon or either chance or inexorable law. Perhaps chance or the nature of things only built into man the 'feeling' that he is free and actually he is not. These and similar questions do not arise from outside the naturalist world view. They are inherent in it." (Pg. 74-75)

He writes, "As I write this, young and old are flocking to various gurus. Bookstores are filled with books pointing East, their spines to the West, of course... So Westerners are still trekking East. And so long as the East holds out promise---promise of peace, of meaning, of significance---people are likely to respond. What will they receive? Not just an Eastern bandaid for a Western scratch for a whole new world view and lifestyle." (Pg. 148)

He asserts, "We are caught in an impasse: The issue is primary; either the self is god and the new consciousness is a readout of the implications of that, or the self is not god and thus is subject to the existence of things other than itself... Most people do not go that route... So we opt for the existence of not only our own self but the selves of others, and thus we require a system that will bring not only unity to our world but knowledge as well. We want to know who and what else inhabits our world. But it we are not the unity-giver (god), who or what is?... We also need a basis for thinking that these needs can be met. Where do we go for that?" (Pg. 202-203)

He concludes, "To accept Christian theism only as an intellectual construct is not to accept it fully. There is a deeply personal dimension involved with grasping and living within this world view, for it involves acknowledging our own individual dependence on God as his creatures, our own individual rebellion against God and our own individual reliance on God for restoration to fellowship with him... To be a Christian theist... leads to an examined life that is well worth living." (Pg. 213-214)

The persistence of this book into a 5th edition is eloquent testimony to its continuing relevance to Christians looking at the world and people around themselves.
Buge
James W. Sire has been a college professor of English literature, philosophy and theology, the chief editor of InterVarsity Press, a lecturer at over two hundred universities in the U.S., Canada, Eastern and Western Europe and Asia, and is the author of books such as Scripture Twisting: 20 Ways the Cults Misread the Bible,Naming the Elephant: Worldview as a Concept,Habits of the Mind: Intellectual Life as a Christian Calling, etc. [NOTE: I am reviewing the original 1976 239-page IVP edition.]

He wrote in the Introduction, "The struggle to discover our own faith, our own world view, our beliefs about reality is what this book is all about. Formally stated, the purposes of this book are (1) to outline the basic world views that underlie the way we in the Western world think about ourselves, other people, the natural world and God or ultimate reality, (2) to trace historically how these world views have developed from a breakdown in the theistic world view, moving in turn into deism, naturalism, nihilism, existentialism, Eastern mysticism and the new consciousness and (3) to encougage us all to think in terms of world views, that is, with a consciousness of not only our own way of thought but also that of other people, so that we can first understand and then genuinely communicate with others in our pluralistic society." (Pg. 15)

He says, "Deism did not prove to be a very stable world view... Preceded by theism, it was followed by naturalism. What made deism so emphemeral?... the inconsistencies within world view itself and the impracticability of some of its principles... Today, we would find even more aspects of deism to question. Scientists have largely abandoned thinking of the universe as a giant clock. Electrons... do not behave like minute pieces of machinery... Furthermore, the personality of man is a 'fact' of the universe. If God made that, must he not be personal?" (Pg. 56)

He argues against naturalism, "could a being whose origins were so 'iffy' trust his own capacity to know? If his mind is coterminous with his brain, if he is only a thinking machine, how can he trust his thought? If consciousness is an epiphenomenon of matter, perhaps the appearance of human freedom which lays the basis for morality is an epiphenomenon or either chance or inexorable law. Perhaps chance or the nature of things only built into man the 'feeling' that he is free and actually he is not. These and similar questions do not arise from outside the naturalist world view. They are inherent in it." (Pg. 74-75)

He writes, "As I write this, young and old are flocking to various gurus. Bookstores are filled with books pointing East, their spines to the West, of course... So Westerners are still trekking East. And so long as the East holds out promise---promise of peace, of meaning, of significance---people are likely to respond. What will they receive? Not just an Eastern bandaid for a Western scratch for a whole new world view and lifestyle." (Pg. 148)

He asserts, "We are caught in an impasse: The issue is primary; either the self is god and the new consciousness is a readout of the implications of that, or the self is not god and thus is subject to the existence of things other than itself... Most people do not go that route... So we opt for the existence of not only our own self but the selves of others, and thus we require a system that will bring not only unity to our world but knowledge as well. We want to know who and what else inhabits our world. But it we are not the unity-giver (god), who or what is?... We also need a basis for thinking that these needs can be met. Where do we go for that?" (Pg. 202-203)

He concludes, "To accept Christian theism only as an intellectual construct is not to accept it fully. There is a deeply personal dimension involved with grasping and living within this world view, for it involves acknowledging our own individual dependence on God as his creatures, our own individual rebellion against God and our own individual reliance on God for restoration to fellowship with him... To be a Christian theist... leads to an examined life that is well worth living." (Pg. 213-214)

The persistence of this book into a 5th edition is eloquent testimony to its continuing relevance to Christians looking at the world and people around themselves.