carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Reduction and Givenness: Investigations of Husserl, Heidegger, and Phenomenology (Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy)

eBook Reduction and Givenness: Investigations of Husserl, Heidegger, and Phenomenology (Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy) download

by Thomas A. Carlson,Jean-Luc Marion

eBook Reduction and Givenness: Investigations of Husserl, Heidegger, and Phenomenology (Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy) download ISBN: 0810112167
Author: Thomas A. Carlson,Jean-Luc Marion
Publisher: Northwestern University Press; Translated edition (May 13, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 261
ePub: 1490 kb
Fb2: 1572 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: txt docx mobi lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Philosophy

Jean-Luc Marion (born 3 July 1946) is a postmodern philosopher and a former student of Jacques Derrida. Marion's take on the postmodern is informed by patristic and mystical theology, phenomenology, and modern philosophy.

Jean-Luc Marion (born 3 July 1946) is a postmodern philosopher and a former student of Jacques Derrida. Although much of his academic work has dealt with Descartes and phenomenologists like Martin Heidegger and Edmund Husserl, it is rather his explicitly religious works that have garnered much recent attention. Series: Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy.

Phenomenology (from Greek phainómenon "that which appears" and lógos "study") is the philosophical study of the structures of experience and consciousness. As a philosophical movement it was founded in the early years of the 20th. As a philosophical movement it was founded in the early years of the 20th century by Edmund Husserl and was later expanded upon by a circle of his followers at the universities of Göttingen and Munich in Germany. It then spread to France, the United States, and elsewhere, often in contexts far removed from Husserl's early work.

Phenomenology Philosophy Movement Books

Phenomenology Philosophy Movement Books. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Going beyond the groundbreaking phenomenological texts of Husserl and Heidegger, Jean-Luc Marion argues for the necessity of a third-that seeks to understand the appearance of phenomena simply on the reality of the appearance along. At once historically grounded and radically new, Marion's study has revitalized phenomenological debate both in Europe and the United States.

oceedings{G, title {Reduction and Givenness: Investigations of Husserl, Heidegger . J. Ball Marion, Thomas Carlson. Jean-Luc Marion and Gianni Vattimo’s Contributions for the Postmodern Faith.

oceedings{G, title {Reduction and Givenness: Investigations of Husserl, Heidegger, and Phenomenology}, author {J. Ball Marion and Thomas Carlson}, year {1998} }. A study of Béla Tarr’s film aesthetics based on Heidegger’s phenomenology, Fauzi Naeim Mohamed. Anglican-Roman Catholic ecumenical dialogue: A case for a Rahnerian logic of symbol.

Reduction and Givenness: Investigations of Husserl, Heidegger, and Phenomenology. Despite the difficulties encountered on the way, the numerous studies carried out in Italy prior to Wodd War II make it clear that the better known philosophers who have left a mark on Italian culture already had begun to take a discreet interest in phenomenology.

This paper examines Heidegger's critique of Husserl in its earliest extant . Far from dismantling Marion’s core proposition, I conclude that the tw. .

This paper examines Heidegger's critique of Husserl in its earliest extant formulation, viz. the lecture courses Ontologie from 1923 and Einführung in die phänomenologische Forschung from 1923/4. Chapters 1-3 are concerned with phenomenology and detail the role of film in terms of the lifeworld, intentionally, reduction and the transcendental in a way which has not been attempted elsewhere

Reduction and givenness: investigations of husserl heidegger and phenomenology. God, guilt, and death: an existential phenomenology of religion. Bloomington, Indiana University Press, pp. 1–12Google Scholar.

Reduction and givenness: investigations of husserl heidegger and phenomenology. Evanston, Northwestern University Press. Husserl: an analysis of his phenomenology.

Reduction and Givenness book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Reduction and Givenness: Investigations of Husserl, Heidegger, and Phenomenology as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Having its roots in phenomenology and existentialism, the SPEP series at Northwestern University Press has brought out an impressive selection of works fundamental to continental philosophy for nearly five decades, including works by and about Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Paul Ricoeur, an.

Having its roots in phenomenology and existentialism, the SPEP series at Northwestern University Press has brought out an impressive selection of works fundamental to continental philosophy for nearly five decades, including works by and about Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Paul Ricoeur, and Edmund Husserl.

Through careful analysis of phenomenological texts by Husserl and Heidegger, Marion argues for the necessity of a third phenomenological reduction that concerns what is fully implied but left largely unthought by the phenomenologies of both Husserl and Heidegger: the unconditional "givenness" of the phenomenon. At once historically grounded and radically new, this phenomenology of givenness has revitalized phenomenological debate in Europe and the U.S.
Comments: (2)
Zavevidi
This is a difficult book. I could have marked it down for that; but aren't philosophically curious people prepared for difficulty, for having their complacency in conveniently arrayed categories disrupted? Maybe not, for some; but they are semantic manipulators, and this book is not for them.
This is a philosophical "argument" the way that "Moby Dick" is a story about whaling. Philosophy here is a field onto which we are ushered so as to be cut adrift, freed from subjective and objective lock down. Clinging to this framework, as did Husserl, as did Heidegger, at a different level, is to be entangled in one's own ropes, bobbing, weaving and succumbing to a deeper and unfathomable depth.
Hegel's "Phenomenology of Spirit" took us through the permutations of the formation of Reason such that subjects and objects can lay claim to certainty; Marion's phenomenology takes us from there, through Hegelian negation (in the form of ontic boredom) or Nietzschean nihilism, right to that milieu where we choose to swim (stand, such as we can) or strap ourselves to the great white apparition (Plato's light, illuminating phenomena, but in which nothing is seen).
This is a book that is out of reach of neo-Kantians (see Dominique Janicaud's flailing at Marion in his essay in "Phenomenology and the 'Theological Turn'"), and both positivists and pragmatists would be at a loss. How can there even be a notion of a "claim" or a "call" to which we must respond that is prior to our existence as a subject? Hint: think being born!!! I think Heidegger would be pleased that the crushing limitations of his thinking, confined in a construction of a grand, but nihilating notion, have been respectfully, appreciatively and totally appropriately surpassed. This is not a critique of Heidegger or Husserl, but an earnest, honest, indeed, worthy continuation of the freely constituting potencies they pointed to, and even longed for, and single-mindedly pursued.
The work leads up to a startling and striking means of phenomenological explication, in four concise steps, that may provide a method for a new mode of discourse. Marion exemplifies that discourse here. His other "phenomenological works," "Being and Givenness" and "In Excess" lay out how the call takes on shapes of Event, Idol, Icon and Flesh, and eventually and ultimately, the Call and Revelation, each of which lays out a post-Hegelian phenomenology in which we must respond by "Hearing" or non-visually discerning that which always already has surpassed our grasping for presence (or nihilating superiority). These are not existential "complexes" that are analyzed according to given schema, but are contexts of realization that set categories and the very ability to analyze at all, into motion (Event: Quantity; Idol:Quality; Flesh: Relation; icon: modality). I could quibble, and will someday, with this transit from moment to category, but that is not the point here, or in this book. Instead, here a powerful, strong, vitally gripping presentation of primal givenness at the moment of singular emergence is offered -- a vision not yet even contemplated in self-organization studies, but now given the leeway to do so -- that can begin the real transformation of the human endeavor. Now we can set sail, as Nietzsche longed to do (but could not while remaining in his current terrestrial bondage).
This is a work, indeed part of a great "corpus," a body of work, that bears promise, not of comprehension and appropriation, but of a continuing voyage: in wonder, never abated; in openness,, never conquered; and in generativity, never named or appropriated.
Are you ready to set sail? Are you ready to encounter, not the sirens, or the Great White Whale, but, as Heidegger calls it, "the cheerfulness and gentleness of creative longing"? ("What is Metaphysics" in "Pathways," p. 93.), where you will encounter, neither certainties nor sirens, but "new and rigorous paradoxes"? (Marion, R&G, p. 205)
Wohald
Jean-Luc Marions fast schon berühmt zu nennende Studie über "Reduction and Givenness", im französischen Original in 1989 veröffentlicht (Originaltitel: "Réduction et Donation") liegt nun in englischer Übersetzung vor. Das Buch war wohl v.a. deshalb insbesondere in der französischen phänomenologischen Szene so einflußreich, weil es seinem Autor gelang, auf originelle Weise verschiedene, vieldiskutierte philosophische Stränge (Husserl, Heidegger, Levinas, M. Henry) zu einer umfassend neuen Darstellung von "Reduktion", hier verstanden als das Grundverfahren der Phänomenologie schlechthin, zusammenzufassen und sich damit einen eigenen Standpunkt in aktuellen Auseinandersetzungen u.a. mit Derrida zu erarbeiten. "Reduktion" wird hier in erster Linie als reine Methodik begriffen, deren sich die Phänomenologie - genauer jede philosophische Bemühung, die sich phänomenologisch nennt -, bedient, ja bedienen muß. Umfassend ist Marions Darstellung in diesem Licht v.a. deshalb, weil er eine allgemeine Deutung der Reduktion vorlegt, die, so die These, von der Anfangsgestalt bei Husserl ihre immer radikaleren Schichten enthüllt und so in Konsequenz zu dem kommt, was Marion "reine Gegebenheit" (donation, givenness) nennt. Hierbei ist die Reduktion weniger als operativer Methodenschritt thematisch, sondern vielmehr die Weise, wie radikal und worauf die Reduktion reduziert. Wird selbige erstmals bei Husserl "entdeckt" und angewendet, so versucht Marion nachzuweisen, daß sie dort zwar eine, über die natürliche Einstellung hinausgehende, Radikalität besitzt, aber doch nicht radikal genug vorgeht: Mit der Reduktion auf die weltkonstituierende transzendentale Subjektivität bleibt Husserl im modernen reflexionstheoretischen Paradigma und dem Subjekt-Objekt-Dualismus befangen und setzt ein allzu rigides Verständnis der Phänomenologie als bloßer Wirklichkeit (anstatt, wie Heidegger, als Möglichkeit) voraus.
Radikaler dagegen ist bereits Heidegger, der genau diese Voraussetzungshaftigeit der Husserlschen Phänomenologie kritisiert und dagegen auf das reine Sein, das nicht mehr Sein von Seiendem ist, reduziert (!). Damit wird vorausgesetzt, daß es auch bei Heidegger so etwas wie eine Reduktion gibt. Oder anders gesagt: Marion unterstellt ein Verständnis von Reduktion (ein sehr allgemeines, notwendigerweise), das es ermöglicht, auch Heideggers Verfahren als Reduktion bezeichnen zu können. Der Leser vermißt leider eine methodologische Reflexion, die - bei Heidegger, wie beim Folgenden - die Möglichkeit einer solchen Lesart von Reduktion begründet oder zumindest diskutiert. Der Begriff "Reduktion" bleibt leider "operativ verschattet", statt daß er - dem Titel des Buches nach eigentlich erwartungsgemäß - ins Thema rückt.(1)
Wie der Titel bereits programmatisch verheißt, wird auch die Heideggersche Reduktion kritisiert mit dem Nachweis, daß auch sie nicht radikal genug sei; denn das Heideggersche Sein, das sich gibt und dem Menschen in einem Seinsgeschick offenbart, setzt wiederum voraus, daß es sich gibt, supponiert das pure Daß, oder mit Marion, seine Gabe selbst. Sein setzt seine Gebung voraus, und auf die Frage, was die Gabe denn gibt, so wird geantwortet: sich selbst. Die Gabe gibt nichts anderes als sich selbst. Wenn das keine Tautologie sein soll, muß sich dies näher bestimmen lassen. Marion meint hiermit offensichtlich eine reine Gegebenheit, die noch jenseits aller Gegensätze (subjektiv-objektiv, aktiv-passiv, Sein-Nichts) angesiedelt ist und eine Art radikaler Ur-Passivität (offensichtlich nicht mehr als in der Opposition von aktiv-passiv) darstellt, hinter die nun wirklich nicht mehr zurückzugehen ist. Dieser Schritt ist sicherlich von Michel Henrys radikalem Rückgang (in diesem Sinn vergleichbar mit einer Reduktion, zumindest in der Lesart Rolf Kühns) auf die absolute Passivität inspiriert, wenn auch Marion sicherlich diese direkte Identifikation ablehnen würde.
Die kritische Frage wäre dann, was über dieses "Phänomen", das eigentlich jenseits aller Phänomenalität angesiedelt ist, noch ausgesagt werden kann im Rahmen von Phänomenologie, die doch das Paradigma von Evidenz und Zur-Anschauung-Bringen nicht aufgeben kann, ohne sich selbst dabei aufzugeben. Die Radikalität der radikalsten aller Reduktionen müßte zur Konsequenz haben, sich nicht mehr als phänomenologisch bezeichnen zu dürfen. Doch die Grenzen und Konsequenzen dieses Vorgehens können auch nicht mehr phänomenologisch reflektiert werden. Diese Undeutlichkeit läßt es zuletzt fraglich oder zumindest unklar erscheinen, worin sich Marions philosophischer Versuch noch als phänomenologisch rechtfertigen läßt. Nicht, daß "die Phänomenologie" über alles ginge, aber was ist es, womit Marion über die Phänomenologie (hinaus)geht?
Dieser Kritik ungeachtet, ist "Réduction et Donation" ein beeindruckendes, gelehrtes und v.a. einflußreiches Buch, das man gelesen haben muß, um von sich behaupten zu können, etwas von französischer Gegenwartsphilosophie zu verstehen. Daher ist es höchst verdienstvoll, daß dieses Werk nun auch in englischer Sprache verfügbar ist, was ihm so evtl. sogar zu einer Wiedergeburt verhelfen wird. Die Übersetzung ist hierbei als gelungen - elegant und technisch-präzise zugleich - zu bezeichnen, und Northwestern hat sie auch zu einem vernünftigen Preis im Verlagsprogramm. Angesichts des Interesses an französischer Philosophie in amerikanischen kontinentalphilosophischen Kreisen hat Northwestern sicherlich klug daran getan, gerade dieses Buch aufzunehmen, sofern es eine ganze Diskussionslage in ihrer Breite auf kompaktem Raum (261 S.) bündelt.
Sebastian Luft (Leuven)
(1) Rudolf Bernet hat - m.E. sehr plausibel - den Versuch unternommen, den Reduktionsbegriff auf eine solche Weise zu verallgemeinern, um sie mit der Idee der Phänomenologie selbst, unter Absehen von einem bestimmten Denker, in Einklang zu bringen; vgl. seinen Text: "Phenomenological Reduction and the Double Life of the Subject", in: Reading Heidegger from the Start. Essays in His Earliest Thought, ed. by Theodore Kisiel and John van Buren, State University of New York 1994, S. 245-267.