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eBook Durkheim and the Jews of France (Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism) download

by Ivan Strenski

eBook Durkheim and the Jews of France (Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism) download ISBN: 0226777359
Author: Ivan Strenski
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (May 14, 2014)
Language: English
Pages: 222
ePub: 1901 kb
Fb2: 1172 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx rtf lit lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Anthropology

In this provocative book, Strenski (religious studies, Univ. of California, Riverside) attacks the widely held view that there is anything "essentially" Jewish in the works of noted French sociologist Emile Durkheim (1858-1917)

In this provocative book, Strenski (religious studies, Univ. of California, Riverside) attacks the widely held view that there is anything "essentially" Jewish in the works of noted French sociologist Emile Durkheim (1858-1917). Strenski argues that Durkheim's sociology (particularly that of religion), rather than having any inherent Jewish content, developed within the context of Jewish intellectual life in the French Third Republic

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Seeking the Durkheim inside the real world of Jews in France rather than the . In this provocative book, Strenski (religious studies, Univ. French nationalism and the body of judaism.

Seeking the Durkheim inside the real world of Jews in France rather than the imagined Jewishness inside Durkheim himself, Strenski adopts a Durkheimian approach to understanding Durkheim's thought. In so doing he shows for the first time that Durkheim's sociology (especially his sociology of religion) took form in relation to the Jewish intellectual life of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France. of California, Riverside) attacks the widely held view that there is anything "essentially" Jewish in the works of noted French sociologist.

Ivan Strenski debunks the common notion that there is anything essentially Jewish in Durkheim's work. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

In: Method & Theory in the Study of Religion. Author: Karen E. Fields 1. View More View Less. 1 1University of Rochester. Online Publication Date: 01 Jan 1999.

Jewish religious leaders have expressed concern that many Israeli and American Jews visit Nepal in a spiritual quest that distances them from their Jewish roots. Durkheim and the Jews of France. Chicago, Il. University of Chicago Press. " writes Rabbi Daniel Gordis. Ashrams in Nepal and India are filled with young Jewish people, mostly American and Israeli. In fact, however, very few Israelis go to Nepal.

Ivan Strenski debunks the common notion that there is anything "essentially" Jewish in Durkheim's work. Seeking the Durkheim inside the real world of Jews in France rather than the imagined Jewishness inside Durkheim himself, Strenski adopts a Durkheimian approach to understanding Durkheim's thought.

Durkheim and the Jews of France. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Strenski I. (2000) The Rest is History. eds) The Craft of Religious Studies. Palgrave Macmillan, New York.

Home Browse Books Book details, Durkheim and the Jews of France. Strenski begins each chapter by weighing particular claims (some anti-Semitic, some not) for the Jewishness of Durkheim's work. Ivan Strenski debunks the common notion that there is anything "essentially" Jewish in Durkheim's work.

History of the Jews in Chicago. At the end of the 20th century there were a total of 270,000 Jews in the Chicago area, with 30% in the city limits. In 1995 there were 154,000 Jews in the suburbs of Chicago. Of them, over 80% of the Jews in the suburbs of Chicago live in the northern and northwestern suburbs. In 1995, the largest Jewish community in the City of Chicago was in West Rogers Park

Ivan Strenski debunks the common notion that there is anything essentially Jewish in Durkheim's work. Seeking the Durkheim inside the real world of Jews in France rather than the imagined Jewishness inside Durkheim himself, Strenski adopts a Durkheimian approach to understanding Durkheim's thought. In so doing he shows for the first time that Durkheim's sociology (especially his sociology of religion) took form in relation to the Jewish intellectual life of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France. Strenski begins each chapter by weighing particular claims (some anti-Semitic, some not) for the Jewishness of Durkheim's work. In each case Strenski overturns the claim while showing that it can nonetheless open up a fruitful inquiry into the relation of Durkheim to French Jewry. For example, Strenski shows that Durkheim's celebration of ritual had no innately Jewish source but derived crucially from work on Hinduism by the Jewish Indologist Sylvain L(r)vi, whose influence on Durkheim and his followers has never before been acknowledged.