carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » The Fish People: Linguistic Exogamy and Tukanoan Identity in Northwest Amazonia (Cambridge Studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology)

eBook The Fish People: Linguistic Exogamy and Tukanoan Identity in Northwest Amazonia (Cambridge Studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology) download

by Jean E. Jackson

eBook The Fish People: Linguistic Exogamy and Tukanoan Identity in Northwest Amazonia (Cambridge Studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology) download ISBN: 0521239214
Author: Jean E. Jackson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1st ed. edition (September 30, 1983)
Language: English
Pages: 302
ePub: 1751 kb
Fb2: 1121 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr lrf lrf lit
Category: Political
Subcategory: Anthropology

Series: Cambridge Studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology (Book 39).

Here, Jean Jackson discusses Bar· marriage, kinship, spatial organization and other features of their social landscape. Series: Cambridge Studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology (Book 39).

In this book, Jean Jackson's incisive discussions of Bará marriage, kinship, spatial organization, and other features of the social and geographic landscape show how Tukanoans (as participants in the network are collectively known) conceptualize and tie together their universe of widely scattered communities, and how an individual's identity emerges in terms of relations with others

The Fish People book.

The Fish People book.

Linguistic exogamy is a form of cultural exogamy in which marriage occurs only between speakers of. .Cambridge University Press.

Gotra: exogamous unit in India.

This book is primarily a study of the Bará or Fish People, one of several Tukanoan groups living in the Colombian . Jackson, Jean E. (Jean Elizabeth), 1943-.

These people . orm part of an unusual network of intermarrying local communities scattered along the rivers of the region. Publication Information.

Online ISBN: 9780511621901. Your name Please enter your name. Who would you like to send this to .

We wonder how land tenure arrangements feature a new kind of resource management in peri-urban areas. Data were obtained from ethnographic and agro-economic interviews combined with a geographic information system analysis of population and land tenure distribution nearby São Gabriel da Cachoeira, Northwest.

Much of her work has been concerned with social identity.

In 1985 she began to examine indigenous mobilizing in Colombia, with a focus on the role of the State and NGOs. Much of her work has been concerned with social identity.

This article illustrates how linguistic exogamy crucially relies upon the alignment of.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

This article illustrates how linguistic exogamy crucially relies upon the alignment of descent and post-marital residence. At the same time, post-marital residence is traditionally patrilocal. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell International.

The Bará, or Fish People, of the Northwest Amazon form part of an unusual network of intermarrying local communities scattered along the rivers of this region. Each community belongs to one of sixteen different groups that speak sixteen different languages, and marriages must take place between people not only from different communities but with different primary languages. In a network of this sort, which defies the usual label of 'tribe', social identity assumes a distinct and unusual configuration. In this book, Jean Jackson's incisive discussions of Bará marriage, kinship, spatial organization, and other features of the social and geographic landscape show how Tukanoans (as participants in the network are collectively known) conceptualize and tie together their universe of widely scattered communities, and how an individual's identity emerges in terms of relations with others. As theoretically challenging as it is unique, the Tukanoan system bears on a wide range of issues of current anthropological concern, such as how to analyze open-ended regional systems in small-scale societies, ideal versus actual patterns of behaviour, identity as both structure and action, and indigenous use of multiple, even conflicting, models of social structure. Professor Jackson's thoughtful discussions also extend to broader social scientific issues concerning the relation of language to culture, the presence or absence of individualism in pre-state societies, the nature of ethnic boundaries, the interplay between observation of behaviour and its interpretation (on the part of both native and anthropologist), and the achievement of flexibility and self-interested goals while applying seemingly rigid social structural principles.