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eBook They Who Do Not Grieve download

by Sia Figiel

eBook They Who Do Not Grieve download ISBN: 1869413458
Author: Sia Figiel
Publisher: Vintage (1999)
Language: English
Pages: 246
ePub: 1649 kb
Fb2: 1688 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: rtf txt lrf mobi
Category: Other

Sia Figiel's powerful, poetic skills weave together the voices of three generations of women from two Samoan families. Gotta give it up to Sia Figiel. This book made me laugh and also gave me moments of pondering. Raw and no sugar-coating in this book.

Sia Figiel's powerful, poetic skills weave together the voices of three generations of women from two Samoan families. Their dream worlds and realities intermingle, just as the histories of each generation run through the next. At the center of the novel is the Samoan woman's tattoo, the malu, believed to be brought from Fiji by Siamese twins. The ghosts of the twins watch over Sia Figiel's powerful, poetic skills weave together the voices of three generations of women from two Samoan families.

Yesterday I read Sia Figiel’s They Who Do Not Grieve, a very rich and disorienting and disappointing novel from a Samoan writer. There are fascinating women in the book but none that are fully explored, probably because there are just too many of them (lineage charts help keep characters and their relationships straight). There are no good men, except perhaps, You-Know Junot but he isn’t kept around long enough to turn into an abusive and/or abandoning partner. The novel needed to reduce its number of characters and focus on one or two of the interesting women, their situations, and their manifestations of change.

Sia Figiel grew up amidst traditional Samoan singing and poetry, which heavily influenced her writing. Figiel's greatest influence and inspiration in her career is the Samoan novelist and poet, Albert Wendt. Her formal schooling was conducted in Samoa and New Zealand where she also began a Bachelor of Arts, which was later completed at Whitworth College (United States)

By (author) Sia Figiel.

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Book description: Identifiers: ISBN 10: 1885030339. Publisher: Originally published: Auckland : Vintage, 1999. This book describes the following items: Women, Samoan Fiction, Samoan Islands Fiction, We found some servers for you, where you can download the e-book "They who do not grieve" by Sia Figiel TXT for free.

Sia Figiel was born in 1967. Download more by: Sia Figiel. Find and Load Ebook They who do not grieve.

Sia Figiel's poetry has won the Polynesian Literary Competition in 1994 and "Where We Once Belonged" was awarded the 1997 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for fiction, South East Asia/South Pacific region. Her work has been translated into French, German, Catalan, Danish, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Portuguese. The shame and grief of not completing the tattoo ceremony go hand in hand with the shame and grief of illicit love and broken promises.

Sia Figiel's powerful, poetic skills weave together the voices of three generations of women from two families. Their dream worlds and realities intermingle, just as the histories of each generation run through the next. At the centre of the novel is the Samoan woman's tattoo, the malu, believed to be brought from Fiji by Siamese twins. The ghosts of the twins watch over the women whose lives are stained by an unfinished tattoo. The shame and grief of not completing the tattoo ceremony go hand in hand with the shame and grief of illicit love and broken promises.
Comments: (6)
sobolica
Beautiful story capturing the complex relationships between the women of a family struggling with shame.
Prince Persie
One of my favorite authors. Well worth the read.
Agagamand
Bought this for my Niece who is afatasi and really wants to know about her Samoan Heritage. I don't believe this book will provide her with a full insight of our culture, but am trying to encourage her to read the new age literature erupting from the promising next generation Authors of Samoa!
Djang
I fell in love with this book. Figiel touches on so many topics and weaves them together incredibly. First and foremost she describes the shame associated with unfinished tattoos in more than words, but in lived situations, and in a way that is much more comprehensable than simply saying "shame." She touches on how the Pacific has been used as this "exotic ideal" and how we too face problems and struggles. Not only Pacific islands, but the women themselves are this exotic ideal. She portrays the beauty of Samoan women, and sometimes the curses associated with being beautiful. Certain chapters take place in New Zealand, and she also describes some of the struggles of being a foreigner, a Samoan in a foriegn country. I especially liked how she described the "community" dynamic, in which Samoans, try to live simultaneously for themselves, but yet have a large more communal role to play in society. She dives into sexuality and the role of Samoan women as well, with great depth. The way she weaves these aspects together is beautiful. I highly recommend this book.

~T. Solo
Barit
Sia Figiel is described as the first contemporary woman novelist from Samoa; so I wondered whether her unusual style (repetitive, staccato, verbless sentences, even paragraphs, sometime just a word or two long) reflects something of the way Samoans speak. But she uses that style not only in chapters where the narrator is Malu, a young Samoan girl, but also where the narrator is her employer, Mrs Winterson, a sad, bored, anorexic American expatriate woman.

The title of the book is ambiguous. The women in the story certainly grieve; but they stoically accept and, for one reason or another, they never grieve aloud. Malu hardly ever speaks anyway. Malu's mother had died soon after Malu's birth. She is brought up by a vicious, violent and foul-mouthed grandmother, Lalolagi, who had violent feelings about Mary as she had about Malu. But Lalolagi also, we eventually discover, also bore a profound grief. Then there is Malu's aunt Ela, living unhappily with an abusive American and rejected by everyone in the village, who also grieves both when he beats her up and when he is drowned. The American is one of the several palagi - foreigners - in the novel who look down on or oppress Samoans.)

One thing is clear: Sia Figiel has no truck with Margaret Mead's idyllic picture of Samoan society in which there is no conflict and everyone is happy. In one place (in a generalization I find it hard to accept though it is certainly true of the families that are the subject of this novel) one of her character says that it was common practice in Samoa for the only words spoken by mothers to daughters were "commands, accusations, curses," so the daughters retreat into an impenetrable shell in which they fantasize or have surrealistic dreams all mixed up with Samoan legends.

Part II of the book seems at first sight to be about a totally different family, until we are told the link some way into this part: as a young woman, Lalolagi had a treacherous friend called Tausi; and Tausi with her granddaughter Alofa are the subject of the second part of the book. This Samoan family had emigrated to Giu Sila, which we will deduce is the Samoan name for New Zealand. The women in that family are every bit as grieving as those in the first part, sometimes for similar reasons (in one of Sia Figiel's extravaganzas she has Afula claim to have been conscious while still in her mother's womb that the mother hated her and had tried to abort her), but also because they do not really feel at home in New Zealand.

It is helpful to know something about the importance of tattooing in Samoan society. It is required for status, and is a very painful procedure, usually taking five sessions spread out over ten days. If the process, for whatever reason, is not completed, that is taken to be the result of cowardice and means disgrace in the community.

There are some characters in the novel who appear and disappear without us knowing who they are or what their function in the story is. I found the mannered style and the surrealist elements tiresome; but I realize that other readers will see a kind of poetry in them.
Flamehammer
Sia Figel has once again done an outstanding job capturing the specifics of life in the transitioning cultures of Samoa in a way that is both artistic and illustrative. In doing so she has captured elements of the unversal that offer a message beyond the exotic South Pacific location into the challenges faced by families in modern life.

Excellently written, these stories are gems not only of Polynesian or ethnographic writing, but of Literature with a capial "L".

Fiame