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by August Derleth

eBook The Memoirs of Solar Pons (The Solar Pons Series, No 3) download ISBN: 0523005431
Author: August Derleth
Publisher: Pinnacle; First Ed edition (1975)
Language: English
ePub: 1299 kb
Fb2: 1321 kb
Rating: 4.8
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Solar Pons is a fictional detective created by August Derleth as a pastiche of Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes.

Solar Pons is a fictional detective created by August Derleth as a pastiche of Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. On hearing that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had no plans to write more Holmes stories, the young Derleth wrote to Conan Doyle, asking permission to take over the series. Conan Doyle graciously declined the offer, but Derleth, despite having never been to London, set about finding a name that was syllabically similar to Sherlock Holmes, and wrote his first set of pastiches.

in the series of Solar Pons books. Solar Pons is hardly the only Holmes knock-off wandering the pages of literature, but his existence - taken in tandem with the aforementioned ef August Derleth apparently never met a literary icon he didn't want to pastiche.

Manufacturer: Pinnacle Books, New York Release date: 5 December 1975 ISBN-10 : 0523005431 ISBN-13: 9780523005430. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

The Memoirs of Solar Pons is a collection of detective fiction short stories by American writer August Derleth. It was the second collection of Derleth's Solar Pons stories which are pastiches of the Sherlock Holmes tales of Arthur Conan Doyle. The Memoirs of Solar Pons contains the following tales: "Introduction", by Ellery Queen. The Adventure of the Circular Room". The Adventure of the Perfect Husband".

the memoirs of solar pons. My friend Solar Pons and I were strolling down Regent Street, and the sunlight sparkling on the glittering displays in the elegant windows of the shops had prompted my companion's apposite remark. the casebook of solar pons. the reminiscences of solar pons. The Solar Pons Series Continued By Basil Copper: the dossier of solar pons. the further adventures of solar pons. It was indeed a perfect day in early June, and as it was my locum's turn to take my rounds and evening surgery, I had readily agreed to a morning stroll from our lodgings at 7B Praed Street. Solar Pons put the tips of his thin fingers together, leaned back in his armchair and blew a cloud of fragrant blue smoke at the ceiling. The windows of our sitting-room at 7B Praed Street were wide open to the fragrant summer air but so hot had been the day that I could see little beads of perspiration standing out on Colonel Mortimer’s forehead as he sipped appreciatively at the ice-cold beer I had plied him with.

The Solar Pons omnibus. A Mycroft & Moran book"-Half . 1. Detective and mystery stories, American.

Other authors: See the other authors section. Series: Solar Pons (3). Members. This long-awaited second collection of pastiches of the immortal Sherlock Holmes offers eleven new adventures of Solar Pons, who has been called by Vincent Starrett "a clever impersonator, with a twinkle in his eye, which tells us that he knows he is not Sherlock Holmes, and knows that we know it, but that he hopes we will like him anyway for what.

The Memoirs of Solar Pons (The Adventures of Solar Pons) (Volume 2. Although this is the second Pinnacle Books collection of Solar Pons stories, most of these are among the very last that Derleth authored before his death.

The Memoirs of Solar Pons (The Adventures of Solar Pons) (Volume 2). August Derleth. Simply put, this is one of the strongest collection of Derleth's short stories. If you love classic Sherlock Holmes, you owe it to yourself to try this volume out. Solar Pons is the name of the Sherlock Holmesian hero Derleth created, and you're right in assuming that he created Pons as a vehicle for writing pastiches in the style of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

The Memoirs of Solar Pons (The Solar Pons Series, No 3) [Paperback] [Jan 01, 1975] August Derleth
Comments: (4)
RuTGamer
As good as the previous two Solar Pons books were, this one is even better. It contains eleven original stories, each one a little gem in its own way. "The Adventure of the Proper Comma" is just amazing! "The Adventure of The Circular Room" and "The Adventure of The Six Silver Spiders" are also both standouts.

An old woman is being gaslighted in "The Adventure of the Circular Room," although Pons and her caregiver are the only people who don't think she's crazy. In "The Adventure of The Perfect Husband," a woman comes to Pons for advice after she sees her husband with another woman and he pretends not to know her. "The Adventure of The Broken Chessman" is a tale of espionage and murder. In "The Adventure of The Dog in the Manger," four famous actors are gathered at the country home of another actor for a weekend house party when the host is murdered in a manner most flamboyant (not to say, hammy). Pons breaks a woman out of an insane asylum in "The Adventure of the Proper Comma." Author August Derleth gives a nod to an untold tale of John Watson with "The Adventure of Ricoletti of the Club Foot." "The Adventure of The Six Silver Spiders" is the Solar Pons version of "The Six Napoleons." A locomotive booked for a special journey seemingly vanishes right off the tracks in "The Adventure of the Lost Locomotive." A man who believes himself to be a werewolf comes under suspicion of three vicious murders in "The Adventure of The Tottenham Werewolf." In "The Adventure of The Five Royal Coachmen," a diplomat with access to highly-sensitive information disappears while fishing. A remarkable macaw unwittingly helps its owner to commit murder in "The Adventure of The Paralytic Mendicant." (This is the story depicted in the cover art.)

Slightly dull foreword by Luther Norris (author, "The Non-Canonical Sherlock Holmes"). Length: 230 pages.

If you're interested in finding out a bit more about Pons, I have two Listmania lists on the subject. One list is for the Pons books written by August Derleth and the other list is for the Pons books written by Basil Copper.
Kikora
I have the same opinion as #1
Uylo
Derleth does (did) a fine job. A few Americanisms (Wisconsinsims, perhaps) show through but well worth the investment of time and money. Should be in any collection.
BoberMod
August Derleth apparently never met a literary icon he didn't want to pastiche. Though more famous for his devotions to H. P. Lovecraft (and his somewhat misguided efforts to establish a Cthulhu Mythos not actually in keeping with the author's original intent), he also spent a fair amount a time aping Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great consulting detective. Solar Pons is hardly the only Holmes knock-off wandering the pages of literature, but his existence - taken in tandem with the aforementioned efforts at cloning the Elder Gods - does make me think that it's an utter shame that Derleth didn't live long enough to launch his own fanfic site. He'd have killed.

Leaving aside Lovecraft for the moment, Derleth's adventures in detectiving go well enough. He hits all his marks (intriguing story titles, tantalizing references to unrecorded cases, pompous pronouncements and massive leaps of logic), but the scaffolding on which he mounts his mysteries isn't as carefully concealed as Doyle's, and the reader is usually easily able to see how everything fits together. Worse, he's missed capturing the Holmes/Watson (known here as Dr. Lyndon Parker) relationship. Watson, for all his second-fiddle status, provides Holmes with valuable back up on several occasions during their adventures, and frequently manages to spark the Great Detective's genius with a passing remark. Parker functions as little more than an amanuensis. The impression I was very strongly left with was that Derleth was unable to write a truly brilliant character, so he had to dumb down the sidekick to make Pons look smarter.

None of this ruins the stories, though if you've read your Doyle lately they'll probably feel a bit like weak-tea in comparison. Still, Derleth can be entertaining, and the edition I read included an unexpected bonus in the form of an introduction by Ellery Queen in which they give an extensive list of Sherlock Holmes pastiches (several of whom I'll probably hunt down).