carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Ten Kids, No Pets (An Apple Paperback)

eBook Ten Kids, No Pets (An Apple Paperback) download

by Ann M. Martin

eBook Ten Kids, No Pets (An Apple Paperback) download ISBN: 0590724592
Author: Ann M. Martin
Publisher: Scholastic
ePub: 1669 kb
Fb2: 1297 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi lrf doc lit
Category: Other

Series: An Apple Paperback. Paperback: 176 pages. Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (May 1, 2006). I was obsessed with naming trends, so finding a book in which the ten kids were named according to a strict system-out of a specific baby-name book-was really intriguing.

Series: An Apple Paperback. ISBN-13: 978-0590436205. Product Dimensions: . x . inches. The first child was named the first name in the A's. The second child was named the second name in the B's. Et cetera. And when we met them, they managed to not be complete caricatures despite the book having so little time to focus on each child.

Home Ann M. Martin Ten Kids, No Pets. By bedtime that night, all of the Rosso kids had spent time in the twins’ room, leaning over the box and cooing at Sally, or talking to her, or trying to stroke the top of her shiny head. She’s awful quiet, Hannah observed

Home Ann M. Ten kids no pets, . 0. Ten Kids, No Pets, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12. When the twins returned to the farmyard, Dinnie handed Faustine the bird. She’s awful quiet, Hannah observed. I think she’s had too much excitement, said Faustine. You’ve always said we can’t get a pet because ten kids is enough. But now you guys are having another kid, so I think we ought to be able to have a dog - or something. Mr. and Mrs. Rosso looked at each other down the length of the picnic table. 1. Pritchard poked his head out from under the tractor.

Ten Kids, No Pets book. I was drawn to this book in childhood because of my obsession with Ann M. Martin's Baby-sitters Club series, and my secret wish to have an army of brothers and sisters. I come back to it as an adult thanks to a friend of mine from work, who purchased a copy and then lent it to me. Interestingly, my childhood and adult reading experiences of this book differ greatly.

Ten Kids, No Pets (An Apple Paperback) by M. Martin Ann, Each chapter a different sibling's perspective . A list of 10 math chapter books and math story collections for kids that explore mathematical concepts through fictional tales and fables. Martin Ann, Each chapter a different sibling's perspective :) Reading At Home Read Aloud Books 2nd Grade Reading Animal Books Kids Lighting Chapter Books Animals For Kids Book Nooks Large Families.

He was an advertising executive in New York, and a very respected one . The ten kids were like stairsteps (except for Fau. stine and Dinnie, the twins, who were a sort of landing on the stairs).

He was an advertising executive in New York, and a very respected one, from what Abbie could tell. On weekdays he wore a dark suit and a tie and polished shoes. Rosso might have been an important businessman, but at least around home, he was just like the absentminded professor in a funny old movie Abbie had once seen. He would lose things and forget things, he was completely disorganized, and his mind was always off in outer space.

Ten Kids, No Pets is a children's novel written by Ann M. Martin. She has also written a sequel entitled Eleven Kids, One Summer.

Martin, Ann . Dawn on the Coast (Babysitters Club), Very Good, Paperback.

I've read it so many times! I love the way you look at it from everybody's point of view and it has a great ending!

Published by Thriftbooks. The (almost) best Ann M. Martin book! Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago. I loved Ten Kids, No Pets. I've read it so many times! I love the way you look at it from everybody's point of view and it has a great ending!

USED
Comments: (7)
LØV€ YØỮ
This is a very entertaining book. My daughter loved this book! Every time I looked around she was glued to this book. I love it.
Felolv
First, let me say that this review is of the 1989 edition. I see that the book is back in print, but I don't know if they've updated it at all.

Now, my review has two parts. The kid part, and the grown-up part. The kid part is pretty short and it runs as follows: I enjoyed this book as a child and re-read it a few times, my nieces enjoyed this book when I read it to them and want to read the sequel, so for pure "kid enjoyment" you pretty much have to say this book has earned its four star rating.

As an adult...

As an adult, I have to say that it occurs to me that Ann M. Martin's writing is incredibly unrealistic. I mean, first, in order for the Rossos to actually have nine births in nine years, each child would have to have been conceived about three months after the last birth (assuming no premature births). But not any closer or they wouldn't be able to fit a kid in each grade. I mean, they really don't have much wiggle room. And then there's the twins with their twin-talk... something which a. isn't as common as all that b. persists primarily with neglected children and c. is typically based upon the actual language the kids hear every day... so if you know what they're saying, you should be able to work backwards and figure out where they got that phrase from, like any babytalk. And then there's the mom's pregnancy (the sequel is Eleven Kids, One Summer, so I trust I'm not spoiling anything here), which is epically horrible. The kids think she's seriously ill! (And she went through this nine times before, yet failed to recognize it for kid number eleven?)

When you come right down to it, as an adult there were a number of places where I was going "yeah, right" at the book.

Luckily, I'm not the target audience. Okay, so the writing is a bit formulaic and there's a lot of completely unrealistic stuff going on. The nieces liked it (it only took us two weeks at a chapter a day, so that's something), I liked it as a kid - that should be enough for anybody.

Just, uh, if you read it as a child? Put it away now. Don't ruin your childhood memories with logic and reason!
Gianni_Giant
This book is an awesome book.

The author keep me entertained the whole time.
The book was a fun easy read.
Goltikree
Loved the book. I'm glad I read the book. It was the best book I've read this week. Read this book you'll love it.
Cobyno
First of all, I don't give a crap about pets. I never wanted pets. I don't relate to wanting animals. And though my family pretty much always had dogs and other critters, it was everybody else who wanted them, and I was sometimes roped into taking care of them even though I didn't want them. So when I saw this book about a family with TEN kids who desperately want a pet--but are always told no because "ten kids is enough"--I didn't relate to that at all, yet wanted to read about the family dynamics in such a crew. I wasn't disappointed.

I was obsessed with naming trends, so finding a book in which the ten kids were named according to a strict system--out of a specific baby-name book--was really intriguing. The first child was named the first name in the A's. The second child was named the second name in the B's. Et cetera. And when we met them, they managed to not be complete caricatures despite the book having so little time to focus on each child. The chapters kept switching and head-hopping between the siblings as they lived their ordinary life, had their secret passage adventures, and sometimes conspired to make their parents let them have a pet. Eventually, though, the parents had to give in because "ten kids is enough" was their excuse, which no longer held upon finding out there was going to be an eleventh. The kids use the same baby-name book to name their dog and cat.
Boraston
Great book, i did it for a book report when I was younger and here is my old summery.
Ten Kids, No Pets is a great example of normal life. You can imagine yourself right in the center of the story. The novel starts out one hot day in August when the Rosso family moves from New York to a New Jersey farm. There are twelve people in the family- Mr. Rosso, Mrs. Rosso, Abbie, Bainbridge, Candy, Dagwood, Eberhard (also known as Hardy), Faustine and Gardenia (the twins), Hannah, Ira, and Jan. The children are all one year apart, except for Faustine and Gardenia. Abbie, the main character in the first chapter can't wait to move. There would be more space, and now she would only have to share a room with Candy. And maybe, they can get a pet, even though mother says ten kids are enough!
The story continues with normal events, but also some very unique events. Candy finds a hidden room, where a young girl was once hidden. The children secretly bring a rabbit there and name it "Secret". Hardy used Secret as his rabbit when he was a magician on Halloween. The hidden room is not a good place for Secret to live, so the kids let him go. School brings more problems. Ira lies that he has eleven pets to get his classmates to like him. That was a big mistake.
Mrs. Rosso wants the kids to have a real Thanksgiving turkey, not a Butterball, so they order one from a nearby farm. The children name the huge, lively turkey Goliath, and visit him often. The ten kids decide Goliath is their friend, and do not want to eat a friend. Without their parents permission, the children order him, still alive, to be delivered Thanksgiving day. The Rosso's have a Butterball for Thanksgiving.
At about Christmas time, "Project X" starts in the basement. No Rosso child knows what it is. It is covered by a black cloth, and no one is allowed to see it without permission from a parent. Jan, the youngest, goes to get a glass of milk in the middle of the night and hears voices in the basement. They are talking about something like a "Doe House". Jan immediately thinks "doghouse". She tells her siblings, and they all agree. The children buy toys and stuff for the new dog. It turns out to be a doll house for Jan.
The story ends with Mrs. Rosso announcing she is pregnant with an eleventh child. The kids argue with her. She always says ten kids are enough, and now she is having eleven! They really want a pet! Mr. and Mrs. Rosso finally that the children can have a pet. The children want a dog, for they have all those toys. But before they go to the pound, the twins find an abandoned kitten. They adopt him instead, and name him Zsa-Zsa. A year after they moved to New Jersey, the Rossos have more friends, a pet, and an almost new addition to their family. What a happy ending!!!