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eBook The future of the theatre download

by John Palmer

eBook The future of the theatre download ISBN: 0848221567
Author: John Palmer
Publisher: Norwood Editions (1977)
Language: English
ePub: 1872 kb
Fb2: 1551 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt lrf mobi doc
Category: Other

by. Palmer, John Leslie, 1885-1944. Theater - England, English drama - History and criticism.

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by. Palmer, John, 1885-1944. London : G. Bell & sons, ltd.

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Palmer John Leslie 1885-1944. Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. 2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact.

The Future of the Theatreby John Palmer. Poems of John ByromMiscellaneous Poems, Part IIby John Byrom. Vol. 1. StagerightA Compendium of the Law Relating to Dramatic Authors, Musical Composers, and Lecturers as Regards the Public Representation of Their Works; With an Appendix, Containing Notes on Various Matters Connected With the Stage, Statutes (Including the Lord Chambeby John Coryton. George Bernard ShawHarlequin or Patriot?by John Palmer. William Ewart GladstoneHis Characteristics as Man and Statesmanby James Bryce.

The Theatre of the future will be split into two categories: Traditional Theatre, and Adaptive Theatre. Traditional theatre will look much like it does today. It will remain shackled to the past-always looking backwards to a time when audiences were more respectful of "culture"-which is a fantasy. Traditional theatre will continue to thrive on Broadway and in the West End, and will still exist on a smaller level in academic settings. The audiences of Traditional Theatre in the future will look much like the patrons of Opera, Ballet, and Symphony do today.

We’re doing this in partnership with other theaters, he adds. Cooperation among theaters is part of the future.

Electronic and digital technologies have spawned an array of media, from 3-D movies to crowd-sourced video like YouTube to smartphones, that compete with the stage (and with other traditional media like books, and each other) for the audience’s finite attention. We’re doing this in partnership with other theaters, he adds. In the past, theaters have been very proprietary, holding onto world-premiere rights. Now many places are sharing; there is a lot of co-producing.