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by Robert Fulford

eBook The Triumph of Narrative: Storytelling in the Age of Mass Culture download ISBN: 0887846459
Author: Robert Fulford
Publisher: House of Anansi Press; 1st Edition. edition (1999)
Language: English
ePub: 1454 kb
Fb2: 1836 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Find sources: "Robert Fulford" journalist – news · newspapers · books . The Triumph of Narrative: Storytelling in the Age of Mass Culture - 1999.

Find sources: "Robert Fulford" journalist – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (November 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Robert Fulford began his career in journalism in the summer of 1950 when he left high school and went to work for The Globe and Mail as a sports reporter.

Triumph of Narrative : Storytelling in the Age of Mass Culture. Narrative has been central to human life for millennia, and the twentieth century has been preeminently the age of the story. Mass culture and mass leisure have enabled us to spend far more time absorbing stories, real and imaginary, than any of our ancestors.

Narrative has been central to human life for millennia, and the twentieth century has been preeminently the age of the story. Whether or not this has been to our benefit is one of the questions raised by journalist and 1999 CBC Massey lecturer Robert Fulford. Narrative, Fulford points out, is how we explain, how we teach, how we entertain ourselves - often all at once. It is the bundle in which we wrap truth, hope, and dread.

In The Triumph of Narrative, celebrated journalist and critic Robert Fulford explores narrative in all of its forms–from . Стр. 11 My hope was eventually to write magazine articles and books, but I was also beginning to realize that when I hear a good story, I have an almost physical need to tell it.

In The Triumph of Narrative, celebrated journalist and critic Robert Fulford explores narrative in all of its forms–from conversation, gossip, and urban legends to journalism, literature, film and television. Fulford vividly illustrates how storytelling formed the core of civilized life, how stories shape us as much as we shape stories, and why the human appetite for narrative persists. In a simpleminded twenty-year-old's way, I began thinking of how I could.

The Triumph of Narrative: Storytelling in the Age of Mass Culture was published by Anansi in 1999

The Triumph of Narrative: Storytelling in the Age of Mass Culture was published by Anansi in 1999.

6 quotes from The Triumph of Narrative: ‘When we make stories . Storytelling is an attempt to deal with and at least partly contain the terrifyingly haphazard quality of life.

6 quotes from The Triumph of Narrative: ‘When we make stories, when we turn raw events into personal sagas, parables, tales, and anecdotes, we are often. The Triumph of Narrative Quotes Showing 1-6 of 6. When we make stories, when we turn raw events into personal sagas, parables, tales, and anecdotes, we are often struggling to come to terms with one of the inescapably difficult and puzzling facts of existence. Large parts of life, sometimes the mots crucial parts, depend on random happenings, contingency.

Mass culture and mass leisure have enabled us to spend far more time absorbing stories, real . Books related to The Triumph of Narrative: Storytelling in the Age of Mass Culture.

Mass culture and mass leisure have enabled us to spend far more time absorbing stories, real and imaginary, than any of our ancestors. Fulford writes engagingly and energetically about narrative history, narrative in news coverage, the rise of electronic narrative, and narrative as it flourishes in the form of gossip, "the folk-art version of literature," revealing to us the mystery, power, and importance of story in all our lives.

The Triumph of Narrative : Storytelling in the Age of Mass Culture. By (author) Robert Fulford. We can notify you when this item is back in stock. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). A lively, strikingly original look at the prevalence and endurance of stories in our lives and our culture. When I hear a good story, I have an almost physical need to tell it.

The triumph of narrative by Fulford, Robert. storytelling in the age of mass culture. 1st Broadway Books trade paperbook ed. by Fulford, Robert. Published 2000 by Broadway Books in New York. Journalism, Literature and society, Narration (Rhetoric), Social aspects, Social aspects of Journalism, Storytelling.

Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Manufacturer: Broadway Release date: 6 February 2001 ISBN-10 : 076790656X ISBN-13: 9780767906562. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product .

Book by Fulford, Robert
Comments: (5)
Ironrunner
Both of the previous reviewers make the same point - which I heartily agree with - that this book would be a shoo-in with undergraduates.
But what about the rest of the world?
This is a fairly short book (152 pages in the main text) divided fairly evenly over five chapters. Nothing surprising there, since the book is the text of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's 1999 Massey lectures delivered by Fulford. Unfortunately the "lecture" element comes across all too clearly, not to mention a certain amount of academic tunnel vision.
The author seems to have a thing about the Bible, which he imperiously dismisses several times, apparently ignoring its ongoing best-seller status.
Of course buying doesn't necessarily constitute believing, but then we are talking about 'storytelling' here, not about 'religious beliefs', and since the author subsequently makes such a big thing about the influence of Sir Walter Scott's novel "Ivanhoe", which has had such a (comparatively) short life span, and given the still ongoing battle in the US over the pro- and anti-evolutionist versions of the creation story, it seems strange, not to say biased, that the influence of the Bible is almost totally ignored.
Having said that, it's hard to know what the Mr Fulford is actually trying to achieve - other than filling five lecture slots.
The author's take on his subject suggests a man who goes to the zoo and looks at the bipeds and the quadrapeds, the carnivores and the herbivores but who, at the end of the day has no idea what an "elephant" looks like, and certainly hasn't the faintest idea whether it's the Indian elephants or the African elephants which have the larger ears.
Looking back, the book came across as being a collection of ideas, loosely strung together, but none of them developed to any significant degree. Despite the constantly academic tone of the book, the author can be engaging, even amusing, and I found the last two chapters "The Cracked Mirror of Modernity" and "Nostalgia, Knighthood, and the Circle of Dreams" thoroughly entertaining. But there's nothing about the contents of the book that really stands out in my mind only a short time after reading it.
I've given the book three stars simply on account of its entertainment value. But would I actually recommend it to anyone interested in the storytelling process?
I don't think so.
[And it's the African elephants which have the larger ears :) ]
Vetitc
So far, I am not impressed by the CBC Lecture series. I haven't read every book, but so far all I have read have been painfully pretentious. They thrash around facts, but don't tie them well together. They end up sounding silly, pompous, and in the final analysis, fail even be fascinating.

This book falls into these pitfalls. It thrashes around a lot, and drops a lot of thoughts, but fails to be compelling or unique.
POFOD
Fulford's slim and easily readable book provides a fascinating glimpse into the way we use stories and narratives today. He points out how gossip is the new American storytelling, how postmodern linguistic theorists have their heads stuck in the sand, and gives startling evidence for how Ivanhoe influenced the culture of the Old South. I have great respect for authors who can provide complex theories in easily readable, humorous prose, and Fulford certainly fits that particular bill. Great for undergrads and anyone who likes a good read.
watchman
An engaging, lucid and thoughtful exploration of the human impulse to tell stories, from urban legends to postmodernist theory. If I were still doing the academic thing I would be assigning this little book to first- and second-year history students. Since the text of this book was given as a series of lectures on CBC radio, it's a very fluid and easy read. Definitely worthwhile.
Kikora
Fulford has opened my eyes to the significance of narrative. In this great reference to the many forms of narrative that are celebrated today and the past, Fulford combines a wonderful randition of thought provoking considerations which have helped me get through first year university english. It should be carried in every university student's backpack!