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eBook Chaucer's Shipman's tale: The lover's gift regained download

by John Webster Spargo

eBook Chaucer's Shipman's tale: The lover's gift regained download ISBN: 0841477892
Author: John Webster Spargo
Publisher: Folcroft Library Editions (1977)
Language: English
ePub: 1529 kb
Fb2: 1715 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf docx txt lit
Category: Other

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Chaucer's Shipman's tale. the lover's gift regained. by John Webster Spargo. Published 1930 by Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia in Helsinki.

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Spargo, John Webster, 1896-1956. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Publication, Distribution, et. Folcroft, Pa. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Chaucer's Shipman's tale : the lover's gift regained, by John Webster Spargo.

Personal Name: Spargo, John Webster, 1896-1956. Note: Includes bibliographical references. Personal Name: Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400. Folcroft, P. .Physical Description: 71 p. ;, 26 cm. General Note: Reprint of the 1930 ed. published by Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia, Societas Scientiarum Fennica, Helsinki, which was issued as n:o 91 of FF communications. Bibliography, etc. 1400 Sources. Personal Name: Boccaccio, Giovanni, 1313-1375.

The Shipman's Tale (also called The Sailor's Tale) is one of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. It is in the form of a fabliau and tells the story of a miserly merchant, his avaricious wife and her lover, a wily monk. Although similar stories can be found in Boccaccio's Decameron, a frequent source for Chaucer's tales, the story is a retelling of a common folk tale: "the lover's gift regained".

The basic story in the Shipman's Tale - "The Lover's Gift Regained" - is ancient and widespread, and it remains in circulation today as an orally transmitted "dirty joke

The basic story in the Shipman's Tale - "The Lover's Gift Regained" - is ancient and widespread, and it remains in circulation today as an orally transmitted "dirty joke. Chaucer's version may well have been based on some oral version, or he may have drawn on one of a number of written versions. Typical of the medieval versions is that in Boccaccio's Decameron, Day 8 Tale 1. There are countless variations on this popular story. For a number of examples see Benson and Andersson, The Literary Context of Chaucer's Fabliaux.

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The Canterbury Tales is the last of Geoffrey Chaucer. The Shipman's Tale Analysis. Despite its relative brevity, the Shipman’s Tale interrogates and complicates several key issues raised in earlier tales

The Canterbury Tales is the last of Geoffrey Chaucer. A rich merchant, who lived at St. Denis, foolishly took a beautiful woman for his wife. She drained his income by demanding clothes and other fine array to make her appear even more beautiful. Despite its relative brevity, the Shipman’s Tale interrogates and complicates several key issues raised in earlier tales. After the darker reaches of the Physician’s and Pardoner’s Tales, the Shipman’s Tale returns to fabliau origins, presenting a reasonably simple trick story, complicated by Chaucer in the telling.

The Canterbury Tales. Sir John is generous; he always brings some gift or money to everyone in the household, even down to the least page, and the servants love him for his gifts. Thus Sir John gives two type of gifts: when he calls the merchant "cousin," giving him a gift of prestige, and when he brings presents to the household, "they were as glad of him comyng, As fowel is fayn when that the sonne up riseth. There is a question, however, about why Chaucer assigned this tale to the Shipman. We would have expected a tale more ribald and lusty from a man of the sea who has been to many ports.