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Calvin A. Pater, Journal of Modern History, 1986.

Sprunger has dealt with a major chapter in Reformed and Puritan history (yes, and Anglican history), and the product represents a fitting response to a laborious task. Calvin A. Pater, Journal of Modern History, 1986

Studies in the History of Christian Thought, 3.

Studies in the History of Christian Thought, 3. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1982. xiii + 485 pp. Dfl. 172. Maurice Lee (a1).

Dutch Puritanism book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Dutch Puritanism: A History of English and Scottish Churches of the Netherlands of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Keith L. Sprunger. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

His main scholarly interests are seventeenth-century English and Dutch Puritanism, the history of printing, Mennonite history, oral history, and historic preservation. Publications include The Learned Doctor William Ames (1972), Dutch Puritanism (1982), Trumpets from the Tower (1994), and Bethel College of Kansas 1887-2012 (2012). He enjoys collecting antiquarian books and historical postcards.

Dutch Puritanism: A History of English and Scottish Churches of the Netherlands in the Sixteenth and .

Dutch Puritanism: A History of English and Scottish Churches of the Netherlands in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Sixteenth Cent J J Early Mod Stud. Halley published such maps for the solar eclipses of 3 May 1715 and 22 May 1724, which were both visible from southern England. In this paper, the author presents examples of earlier maps depicting solar eclipse paths from Germany, the. Netherlands and France.

David Loades, History Today Historians have always known that the English Reformation was more than a simple change .

David Loades, History Today Historians have always known that the English Reformation was more than a simple change of religious belief and practice. This book investigates further implications of the transformative religious changes of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries for the nation, the town, the family, and for their culture. Show all. Table of contents (5 chapters). The Protestant Nation. The Protestant Family. Pages 63. Collinson, Patrick.

Sprunger, Keith L. Dutch Puritanism A History of English and Scottish Churches of the Netherlands in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries Studies in the history of Christian thought, v. 31. Leiden: Brill, 1982

Sprunger, Keith L. Leiden: Brill, 1982. Sprunger, Keith L. Trumpets from the Tower: English Puritan Printing in the Netherlands 1600-1640 . Brill Leiden Boston 1994. Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton Stanard. The Virginia Colonial Register. Albany, NY: Joel Munsell's Sons Publishers, 1902. OCLC 253261475, Retrieved July 15, 2011.

In the early 17th century, thousands of English Puritans colonized North America, mainly in New England. Puritans were generally members of the Church of England who believed that the Church of England was insufficiently reformed, retaining too much. Puritans were generally members of the Church of England who believed that the Church of England was insufficiently reformed, retaining too much of its Roman Catholic doctrinal roots, and who therefore opposed royal ecclesiastical policy under Elizabeth I of England, James I of England, and Charles I of England.

Because what happened to various colonized groups numbering in the thousands or millions of people is remembered today in their joint history. Each nation had it’s own ethnic and religious make up of their population. And they all had different policies towards colonies, and different colonizing behavior. Furthermore, the time line for each nation, and when they granted freedom or independence was varied and different. Each colonizing nation treated people in their colonies differently. This was sometimes based on skin color, race, ethnic group or religion. We should not leave Russia, Belgium.

The roots of Puritanism are to be found in the beginnings of the English Reformation. To Puritans, the Church of England retained too much of the liturgy and ritual of Roman Catholicism. The name Puritans (they were sometimes called precisionists ) was a term of contempt assigned to the movement by its enemies. Although the epithet first emerged in the 1560s, the movement began in the 1530s, when King Henry VIII repudiated papal authority and transformed the Church of Rome into a state Church of England.

Comments: (2)
Gashakar
As with so much of today's new informational technology, this site is a mixed blessing. It gives reviewers the opportunity to impart either useful information or misleading twaddle. Unfortunately, the comments from "PD from Wildwood NJ" about Professor Sprunger's "Dutch Puritanism" fall into the latter category.
As a specialist in the field, I can say with assurance that this book is the most comprehensive and best-researched work yet written about this subject. It aims at imparting new information gleaned from years of study in Anglo-Dutch archives and setting it in a proper context.
Professor Sprunger provides brief social and religious summaries at appropriate intervals, but he generally assumes that readers will come to the subject already armed with considerable background knowledge. Any expert scanning the footnotes and bibliography can immediately appreciate the depth and breadth of his contribution.
This book is extremely important for anyone working in the fields of Anglo-Dutch Puritanism and American colonial history.
Wilalmaine
Keith Springer chairs the Bethel College History Department at Bethel College, Kansas. His copious attention to the mundane is an instant depressant. Here is yet another attempt to chronicle the history of the church in such a way as to forcefully arrive at preconceived conclusions. Keith Sprunger always fails to give the reader the appropriate depth that comes with a concept of social setting. There is not one anectdote to recommend. Sprunger gives no dimension to an exhausted paradigm.