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eBook Sea-Horse in the Sky download

by Edmund Cooper

eBook Sea-Horse in the Sky download ISBN: 0441756557
Author: Edmund Cooper
Publisher: Ace; Ace edition (January 1, 1978)
Language: English
ePub: 1578 kb
Fb2: 1501 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi rtf lrf lrf
Category: Other

Sea-Horse in the Sky Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1978. I bought this book a great many years ago from a book club and I doubt that I read it at the time.

Sea-Horse in the Sky Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1978. by. Edmund Cooper (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Although written over forty years ago, it follows a pattern of recent fiction.

Sea-Horse in the Sky book. A gentleman never does his nut in the presence of a lady. This little-known story begins when over a dozen people awake. Sea-Horse in the Sky, by Edmund Cooper is the first old (from 1969) Science Fiction novel that I've recently read that provided some of that sense of wonder that turned my on to the genre when I was a kid. No, it hasn’t made the upper echelons of Sci-Fi classics, but it’s a pretty cool book anyway. The novel begins with 16 strangers waking up in My dear, he said lightly. You must allow me the privilege of a certain quaint hypocrisy.

But elsewhere in the hotel, the lenses were to remain untouched. Thus, reasoned Grahame, the watchers should be able to infer that their specimens, while not objecting in principle to observation, felt that they were entitled to some degree of privacy. Immediately after breakfast, he organized a more thorough investigation of their surroundings than had been possible or even desirable on the day of their arrival.

Sea-Horse in the Sky - Readable fantasy/sci-fi. com User, January 2, 1998. After having read a number of Edmund Cooper's other books (namely Kronk and Prisoner of Fire), I had very high hopes for this book

Sea-Horse in the Sky - Readable fantasy/sci-fi. After having read a number of Edmund Cooper's other books (namely Kronk and Prisoner of Fire), I had very high hopes for this book. The mystery present in so many of his novels is present at the beginning, but this is surpassed by the vision and stylish splendour of the, rather unexpected, ending.

Sea-horse in the sky. Cooper, Edmund, 1926-1982. Books for People with Print Disabilities. London, Hodder & Stoughton. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by MishelP-loader on August 30, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

One moment flying peacefully in the sky, the next lying in an un-Earthly green coffin. Grahame was the first to emerge from this strange resting place. But for him, as well as for the others, it had been only the ecliptical experience. Soon all were to find themselves lost in a bizarre world of Mediaeval knights, Stone Age warriors and gremlins, caught unalterably in the weirdest cocoon of Time. was one of a handful of passengers flying from Stockholm to London. One moment flying peacefully in the sky, the next lying in an un-Earthly green coffin.

Slight Creasing To Spine and Wear To Edges Of Pages Title: Seahorse in the Sky (Coronet Books) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Author: Edmund Cooper ISBN 10: 0340129751. Publisher: Coronet Books ISBN 13: 9780340129753. All used books sold by Book Fountain. See all 6 pre-owned listings.

Edmund Cooper (30 April 1926 – 11 March 1982) was an English poet and prolific writer of speculative fiction, romances, technical essays, several detective stories, and a children's book. These were published under his own name and several pen names. Born in Marple, near Stockport, Cheshire, Cooper left school at the age of 15. In 1942 he became engaged at 16 to a teacher four years older than he was, and married her four years later on 13 April 1946

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Overman Culture.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

or, THE INLAND SEA. By James Fenimore Cooper

or, THE INLAND SEA. By James Fenimore Cooper. If the exhibition made of this oldacquaintance, in the novel circumstances in which he now appears, shouldbe found not to lessen his favor with the Public, it will be a sourceof extreme gratification to the writer, since he has an interest in theindividual in question that falls little short of reality.

Eight men and eight women, with curious bumps on the backs of their heads, and no memory of anything but an interrupted journey, a flight that never landed. They emerged from their green plastic coffins one by one, into the sunlight of an endless alien plain.
Comments: (7)
DART-SKRIMER
What a treat! A group of passengers on an international airline flight wake up to find themselves in an alien environment manufactured to make them feel at home. What is to be done about the medieval knight encountered, and the apparent stone age civilization in the distance? And why are they there, anyway? The sequence of events makes for a satisfying read, and though the experience for the characters is mind-blowing, the story proceeds with a matter-of-factness that is streamlined and refreshing.
Saimath
A different, surreal type of science fiction. Both curious and entertaining. Perhaps not for modernists, who prefer technology loaded sci-fi, but I would certainly recommend it for those who are prepared for something a little different. The story is based upon the seizure and confinement of three distinct groups of humans who are placed upon another planet. At first they believe themselves to be human guinea pigs, however, as the story evolves it transpires that their survival might have been the reason. The title refers to the aliens. Early on the humans believe that they are seeing angels, but as the opportunity presents, they realise they look more like seahorses.
Cemav
Read this as a kid and it has stuck with me for years. Repurchased recently and enjoyed it just as much today - which is something to say because many of the "great" stories I read as a kid were not really so good later on.
Mariwyn
Edmund Cooper entertains with a story about a group of people who have been transported from an airliner to an unknown location. (A precursor to Lost?) Some people deal with the situation better than others. I won't give away too much when I say, reading this book will give you pause. There were several times when I asked myself, "What would I do in this situation?"
Araath
A tight, thrilling sci-fi adventure, one of Coopers best.
Qus
This little-known story begins when more than a dozen people wake up in coffins. They find themselves in a small area made to look like part of a town -- it contains a fully stocked store and hotel, a car parked on the street (that doesn't run) -- and a bunch of plastic coffins, each containing a passenger from an international flight, each apparently snatched out of midair, since there is no flight wreckage, and all of them seem to be alive and unharmed.

The people slowly gather in the hotel and find themselves able to understand one another perfectly, even though they don't all speak the same language. None of them has any idea what they're doing in this new place, and there isn't anything for miles around their little settlement except a seemingly endless expanse of grass.

After several weeks of waiting for rescue that never arrives, a few of their number explore and discover that this mysterious land is also populated by a group of what appear to be medieval people and another group of what seems to be cavemen. That accounts for the human population on this island . . . the only other creatures around are the sinister metal spiders.

This story is as much mystery as it is science fiction, because these people must figure out how they got to this place, and why they were chosen. But they also have to survive.

Well worth checking out, if you can find a copy.
Dusho
I bought this book a great many years ago from a book club and I doubt that I read it at the time. I read it at this time largely as research for a quite different book I'm writing. Although written over forty years ago, it follows a pattern of recent fiction. As such, the author has created a timeless novel. Basically, there is one mystery and the novel revolves around resolution of that mystery. The basic story can be read from other reviews.

As a student of writing, I was mainly interested in the mechanics of the book. I noticed that the author used a large amount of narration and a much smaller amount of dialog. But, that was not really noticeable. My current novel is similar and I was surprised. The book included enough action that I was not bored. The current trend is toward more action, but I didn't feel slighted. The dialog seemed lifelike or as lifelike as communication with medieval people and stone-age people could be. I noticed a few typos, but they weren't difficult to get through.

Regarding the title, it was explained in the last few chapters.

In summary, I enjoyed reading Sea Horse in the Sky and would recommend it to anyone interested in a light read.
After having read a number of Edmund Cooper's other books (namely Kronk and Prisoner of Fire), I had very high hopes for this book. I was intrigued as to what Mr Cooper could add to the fantasy genre to compare with his efforts in the field of sci-fi. The mystery present in so many of his novels is present at the beginning, but this is surpassed by the vision and stylish splendour of the, rather unexpected, ending. While I did not enjoy this book to the extent to which I had the others, this is still a wonderful read.