carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style

eBook Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style download

by Bernhard Roetzel

eBook Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style download ISBN: 0760724989
Author: Bernhard Roetzel
Publisher: Barnes & Noble, Inc; 1st Edition edition (2000)
Language: English
Pages: 357
ePub: 1351 kb
Fb2: 1927 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr doc lit txt
Category: Other

Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style Paperback – 2000

Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style Paperback – 2000. by. Bernhard Roetzel (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Start by marking Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style as Want to Read . Those who study Bernhard Roetzel's wonderful book need have no worries.

Start by marking Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Here is all one needs to assume the mantle that epitomises civilized man. Here is richness indeed - for here is the gentleman's handbook.

Gentleman : a timeless fashion. Roetzel, Bernhard. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 17, 2012.

Author:Bernhard Roetzel. Gentleman is the tried-and-tested guide on matters of style and quality. All of our paper waste is recycled within the UK and turned into corrugated cardboard. World of Books USA was founded in 2005. Book Condition:VERYGOOD. We want your experience with World of Books to be enjoyable and problem free. Показать все 2 объявления с подержанными товарами. From choosing a good tailor to proper shoe care, this book is an indispensible companion for indisputable good taste.

Format Hardback 376 pages.

Bernhard Roetzel (born August 17, 1966 in Hannover) is a German author. He is known for writing Gentleman. A Timeless Guide to Fashion. A Timeless Guide to Fashion was first published in German in 1999, by the publishing house Koenemann

Bernhard Roetzel (born August 17, 1966 in Hannover) is a German author. A Timeless Guide to Fashion was first published in German in 1999, by the publishing house Koenemann.

Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion. This is more like an Eyewitness Guide/Encyclopedia Book or a Coffee Table book than a practical Guide to Grooming. It is full of journalistic fluff, museum pictures of old Barber Shop memorabilia, historical timelines, photos of men with extremely outlandish hairstyles, their bodies covered with tattoos, and very little that is useful or practical for the average man.

The newest book by Bernhard Roetzel is called Gentleman Lookbook. Instead of giving written instructions, Mr. Roetzel uses an international group of well dressed individuals to show the reader how others approach classic style. The book is divided in three main stylistic chapters: Business Wear, Weekend Country Style and Formal Wear. I found these names to be a bit vague yet appropriate – after all, life is pretty much divided to work, free time and occasional festivities. Text is only present to describe the origins of the garments and in the introductions of chapters.

German/European (with some contributions from London) views of male grooming, closed tear to rear panel else VG/VG, 1st edn, heavy book, oblong, many photos to help guide the novice, 352pps + index.
Comments: (7)
zzzachibis
The book covers every aspect of men's clothing and answers questions about how to tell if an item is worth the money. I was delighted whenever a marque I own showed up. I fear far too many men feel they are well-dressed if they've taken a shower before leaving home. Our apparel is our chance to tell the world how we think and feel about ourselves, and pots of money aren't always necessary. God bless eBay!!!
Naa
I have the hardback copy of this book and enjoy it very much. I use it for referrence quite often. This soft cover edition actually contains more information than the hardback and anyone who wants to learn how to dress properly or has a teenage son who wants to learn the proper way to present himself will love this book. I highly recommend it for anyone who cares about how they look, how good shoes are made, how to clean a suit, and a hundred other things that a man should know about dressing and clothes. It means nothing but the copy that arrived in the mail does not have a man in his underwear on the cover so apparently there are several editions of this soft cover book out there.
Ynneig
If you search for Bernhard Roetzel on Amazon, you will find several books that look very similar but not quite the same, including Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style (this book, originally available as a softcover), Gentleman: A Timeless Fashion (with a red cover), and Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion (with a pinstripe cover). I was confused as to whether these were revised and updated editions, re-printings, or what, so I ordered them all. Here is what I found.

Roetzel is a German who makes a living writing about style for outlets with which I am generally not familiar. For some reason, he writes about English style. Of course, Germans--that is German nobility, or German "gentlemen"--had their own styles at one time. Just as there was an English suit and an Italian suit, there is or was a German suit, and some style choices that were considered faux pas in England were acceptable in Germany and vice versa. Perhaps this is no longer the case, but whatever the situation, Roetzel is a German Anglophile and he writes about English style. Accordingly, the first book seems to have been a 1990s-era German book called "Der Gentleman" (I don't have this one) a guide for Germans to the English gentlemen.

Der Gentleman was then translated into English as "Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style." With typically German thoroughness, Gentleman's Guide provides a very complete and detailed guide to the clothing and toileting of an English gentleman. Methodically arranged and well-illustrated with high-quality photos, Gentleman's Guide is somewhere in between a coffee-table book and a reference book. You will find out not only about different types of shirt collars but also see beautiful photos of a typical English breakfast and find advice on what to wear when riding horseback. The only thing comparable I have found are Alan Flusser's books, but they are not quite the same. Flusser is focused on educating the reader to be aware of when buying a suit or choosing clothes to wear to the office or a night out. Roetzel is more focused on documenting the clothes and lifestyle of a certain class, place, and time period.

Gentleman's Guide was a Barnes & Noble Book and for some reason came out as a paperback first. It came out as a hardcover several years later under the same name and with no changes. Then H.F. Ullmann produced a book called Gentleman: A Timeless Fashion, followed a year later by Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion. This last book is a hardcover with a pinstripe design rather than the well-known red cover. It turns out that Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion is almost exactly the same book as the original Gentleman's Guide. For the most part, only cosmetic changes have been made. The graphic design has been updated with new fonts, colors, and layout. A few paragraphs have been replaced by new ones here and there. A few illustrations have been replaced. The biggest change is the absence of the blonde, blue-eyed model who graced both the outside cover of the Gentleman's Guide as well as the chapter headings.

When I tried to order Gentleman: A Timeless Fashion, I got sent a copy of the Gentleman's Guide instead, which just goes to show how close they are. (Although I can't say for sure, I'd be willing to bet that A Timeless Fashion is exactly the same as Gentleman's Guide, and was simply produced before H.F. Ullmann decide to make the cosmetic changes in A Timeless Guide to Fashion.)

From my perspective, A Timeless Guide to Fashion was a small step backwards from the Gentleman's Guide. Any man who is really interested in these books is probably more likely to enjoy the older fonts and design choices over the newer ones. Moreover, the red cover and model were distinctive. If I were shopping for one of these books today, I would get a copy of the Gentleman's Guide or A Timeless Fashion and forgo A Timeless Guide to Fashion altogether.

As for a general review of these books, it almost goes without saying that a true gentleman would never own or rely on one. The material is so detailed as to be almost a send-up of the English gentleman rather than a sartorial exploration. Moreover, the contention of the book's forward, that a gentleman is any man who lives and conducts himself in a certain manner, is a modern democratic conceit. Most of the material objects and lifestyle shown in this book are beyond the reach of 95% of its intended audience. And with moola', one would still need to combine leisure and birth. However, for me this does not detract from the enjoyment of the book because, like Roetzel, I am something of an Anglophile. For the $20 sunk cost of this book, I can sit down any time I want with a Glenlivet or Veuve Clicquot and be transported for 30 minutes. This is the consideration you have to make when considering whether to buy one of Roetzel's books. Are you looking for help choosing the right suit for the right occasion, or are you a fan of a lost male culture? If you are looking to educate yourself about clothes, buy one of Flusser's books; if you are looking for escape or inspiration, Roetzel is the way to go. (Another purchasing consideration is the gift. One of these books would make a great gift, and at this price for A Timeless Guide to Fashion--a new hardcover full-color glossy--it would be hard to go wrong.)
Molace
This book is the best it has a whole plethora of gentlemen information
Eigonn
Updated review:

If you search for Bernhard Roetzel on Amazon, you will find several books that look very similar but not quite the same, including Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style (this book, also available in hardcover), Gentleman: A Timeless Fashion (with a red cover), and Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion (with a pinstripe cover). I was confused as to whether these were revised and updated editions, re-printings, or what, so I ordered them all. Here is what I found.

(NOTE: Please note that two cover images appear in Amazon for this book Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style. There are not two printings with different colors. The cover showing the model in underwear is a mistake and is actually an image of "Gentleman: A Timeless Fashion", as linked to above and described below...)

Roetzel is a German who makes a living writing about style for outlets with which I am generally not familiar. For some reason, he writes about English style. Of course, Germans--that is German nobility, or German "gentlemen"--had their own styles at one time. Just as there was an English suit and an Italian suit, there is or was a German suit, and some style choices that were considered faux pas in England were acceptable in Germany and vice versa. Perhaps this is no longer the case, but whatever the situation, Roetzel is a German Anglophile and he writes about English style. Accordingly, the first book seems to have been a 1990s-era German book called "Der Gentleman" (I don't have this one) a guide for Germans to the English gentlemen.

Der Gentleman was then translated into English as "Gentleman's Guide to Grooming and Style." With typically German thoroughness, Gentleman's Guide provides a very complete and detailed guide to the clothing and toileting of an English gentleman. Methodically arranged and well-illustrated with high-quality photos, Gentleman's Guide is somewhere in between a coffee-table book and a reference book. You will find out not only about different types of shirt collars but also see beautiful photos of a typical English breakfast and find advice on what to wear when riding horseback. The only thing comparable I have found are Alan Flusser's books, but they are not quite the same. Flusser is focused on educating the reader to be aware of when buying a suit or choosing clothes to wear to the office or a night out. Roetzel is more focused on documenting the clothes and lifestyle of a certain class, place, and time period.

Gentleman's Guide was a Barnes & Noble Book and for some reason came out as a paperback first. It came out as a hardcover several years later under the same name and with no changes. Then H.F. Ullmann produced a book called Gentleman: A Timeless Fashion, followed a year later by Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion. This last book is a hardcover with a pinstripe design rather than the well-known red cover. It turns out that Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion is almost exactly the same book as the original Gentleman's Guide. For the most part, only cosmetic changes have been made. The graphic design has been updated with new fonts, colors, and layout. A few paragraphs have been replaced by new ones here and there. A few illustrations have been replaced. The biggest change is the absence of the blonde, blue-eyed model who graced both the outside cover of the Gentleman's Guide as well as the chapter headings.

When I tried to order Gentleman: A Timeless Fashion, I got sent a copy of the Gentleman's Guide instead, which just goes to show how close they are. (Although I can't say for sure, I'd be willing to bet that A Timeless Fashion is exactly the same as Gentleman's Guide, and was simply produced before H.F. Ullmann decide to make the cosmetic changes in A Timeless Guide to Fashion.)

From my perspective, A Timeless Guide to Fashion was a small step backwards from the Gentleman's Guide. Any man who is really interested in these books is probably more likely to enjoy the older fonts and design choices over the newer ones. Moreover, the red cover and model were distinctive. If I were shopping for one of these books today, I would get a copy of the Gentleman's Guide or A Timeless Fashion and forgo A Timeless Guide to Fashion altogether.

As for a general review of these books, it almost goes without saying that a true gentleman would never own or rely on one. The material is so detailed as to be almost a send-up of the English gentleman rather than a sartorial exploration. Moreover, the contention of the book's forward, that a gentleman is any man who lives and conducts himself in a certain manner, is a modern democratic conceit. Most of the material objects and lifestyle shown in this book are beyond the reach of 95% of its intended audience. And with moola', one would still need to combine leisure and birth. However, for me this does not detract from the enjoyment of the book because, like Roetzel, I am something of an Anglophile. For the $20 sunk cost of this book, I can sit down any time I want with a Glenlivet or Veuve Clicquot and be transported for 30 minutes. This is the consideration you have to make when considering whether to buy one of Roetzel's books. Are you looking for help choosing the right suit for the right occasion, or are you a fan of a lost male culture? If you are looking to educate yourself about clothes, buy one of Flusser's books; if you are looking for escape or inspiration, Roetzel is the way to go. (Another purchasing consideration is the gift. One of these books would make a great gift, and at this price for A Timeless Guide to Fashion--a new hardcover full-color glossy--it would be hard to go wrong.)
Frdi
Well worth the money. I will buy a soft back copy to pass on to the young men in my family. Better than any American men's style guide currently found . A near perfect men's style guide. Almost as good as the men's style guides Esquire and Playboy published in the sixties.